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Zyrisk Music Feed

Dark fantasy, ambient, and orchestral music.

A feed by Zyrisk

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20210522-20210906

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This track began as a piece intended to mimic Quiet Water by Toby Fox, but it developed beyond that initial idea.


20200520-20210105

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This track uses Bitwig Random modulators and other devices to create many randomized elements. Pay close attention to the reversed choral voices which fade in and out of the mix at random times and intervals. These eerie whispers are generated by granular synthesis and further randomized by Bitwig modulators. Other elements are less subtle. The brass section's effect rack produces random pitch bends and panning. High percussive elements like shakers and temple blocks strike and ring out at semi-random times and at semi-random velocities.

Here's the full list of randomized elements:

  • Brass Section (1:17 - 1:55) A Bitwig EQ+ device with two bell bands set to +3 dB randomly sweep across the frequency spectrum. This device is placed within a Bitwig Delay-2's Feedback FX Chain resulting in a pitch bending effect.

  • Snap Pizzicato Strings (0:38 - 1:55) A Bitwig Arpeggiator device selects random notes from a chord. The resulting notes feed into a chain of Bitwig Multi-Note modules. Each Multi-Note module has all of its notes disabled, but a Bitwig Random modulator allows the Arpeggiator's midi signal to pass through the device randomly. This creates a subtle effect which is silent most of the time, but occasionally produces a note from a snap pizzicato string.

  • Reversed Choir "Hoo!" (1:55 - 2:33) A sample of a choir shouting "Hoo!" passes through a Bitwig EQ+ with slightly randomized frequencies. The signal is then fed through a Bitwig Delay-2 device with a Bitwig Freq Shifter within its Feedback FX Chain. The Freq Shifter's Shift value is randomly modulated as well, producing a slightly different pitch each time the signal is fed back through the device.

  • Reversed Choir "Ha!" (1:55 - 2:33) A sample of a choir shouting "Ha!" passes through a Bitwig Tool device with randomized panning.

  • Granular Synthesis Choir "Hoo!" (0:38 - 2:33) A sample of a choir shouting "Hoo!" is fed through a New Sonic Arts Granite device and subsequently routed through a variety of other devices. One of the devices randomly adjusts the rack's overall volume. This random modulator does not actually modify the volume directly but instead modulates a Bitwig Polynom modulator which biases the overall volume output toward a higher value.

  • Granular Synthesis Choir "Ha!" (0:38 - 1:55) A sample of a choir shouting "Ha!" is fed through a New Sonic Arts Granite device and subsequently routed through a variety of other devices. One of the devices randomly adjusts the rack's overall volume.

  • Grand Lithophone (0:38 - 1:17) A series of Bitwig Multi-Note devices randomly determine when the instrument plays a note. A Bitwig Note Pitch Shifter device randomly adjusts the note's pitch (which is subsequently constrained by a Bitwig Diatonic Transposer device). Finally, a Bitwig Note Velocity device randomly determines the note's velocity.

  • Shaker (0:00 - 2:31) This instrument's volume is adjusted randomly, but a Bitwig Polynom device biases this volume toward higher values.

  • High Percussion Riffs (0:38 - 1:17) A sample of high percussion riffs from Vienna Symphonic Library's Eridanus is passed through a Bitwig Tool device which randomly adjusts its volume. A Bitwig Polynom device biases the volume toward higher values.

  • Main and Low Percussion Riffs (0:00 - 2:31) A sample of main and low percussion riffs from Vienna Symphonic Library's Eridanus are passed through Bitwig Tool devices which randomly adjust their volume.

  • Taiko, Surdo, and Temple Block Ensemble (0:38 - 1:55) These drums' midi signal is interrupted randomly by a Bitwig Multi-Note device.

  • Thunder Toms (0:38 - 1:55) These drums' midi signal is interrupted randomly by a Bitwig Multi-Note device.


20191103-20200513

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The chords which begin at 0:41 that back the guitar section were initially performed with VSL's Concert Guitar patch but were subsequently bounced, reversed, and processed further with a Bitwig Resonator Bank and Delay-2. The choirs which begin at 1:47 achieve their haunting character by mixing in and out a Bitwig Pitch Shifter device set to -1 semitone. Several instruments (particularly the Celesta at 2:29) are processed with Bitwig's Delay-4 device set to the Ghost Wind factory preset. This adds an eerie pitch shifting tail to the sound.


20190810-20191031

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20190125-20190809

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The first 16 measures of this track use a repeating pattern of time signatures: 3 measures of 5/4 followed by 1 measure of 6/4. After the first 16 measures (at about 0:53) a contrasting section begins and the time signature changes to 3/4.


20180929-20190120

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This track's structure mimics Terra's Theme from Final Fantasy VI.


20180323-20180923

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20180209-20180318

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20180128-20180209

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This track uses Piz MIDI's midiStrum VST. Bitwig modulators randomly adjust the strumming speed.


20171002-20180127

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I used Granite to create this track's creepy atmospheric sounds.


20170822-20171001

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20170725-20170821

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20170713-20170725

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20170620-20170716

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This track's structure mimics Nerevar Rising from The Elder Scrolls III: Morrowind.


20170117-20170618

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This is the first track I made with Bitwig and Composer Cloud. The chord progression is taken from Zelda's Lullaby.