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Minimalism and Warmth Harmonize in This Boxy Mexico City Home

Permalink - Posted on 2022-08-18 16:18

Designed with a muted color palette, Casa Verónica effortlessly adds an earthy touch to its urban surroundings.

urban context

Houses We Love: Every day we feature a remarkable space submitted by our community of architects, designers, builders, and homeowners.

Project Details:

Location: Nuevo Vallarta, Nayarit, Mexico

Architect: REA Studio

Footprint: 2,396 square feet

From the Architect: "Keeping in mind the financial needs of our clients, the developers, we began to implement strategies concerning the local and international markets, given the home’s location in one of the most attractive areas in Mexico for real estate investment in recent years.

"The result is a quiet façade that only shows you little of what is going on inside: construction techniques dominated by local labor, a social area without programmatic boundaries adapting to the needs of the people who live there, and the constant promotion of coexistence among inhabitants. Casa Verónica is an embodiment of warmth, intimacy, and coexistence, a timeless structure that seeks to blur the boundaries between indoor and outdoor."

side facade view

side facade view

Photo by César Béjar

front facade view

front facade view

Photo by César Béjar

main door

main door

Photo by César Béjar

urban context

urban context

Photo by César Béjar

main entrance

main entrance

Photo by César Béjar

view towards pool area

view towards pool area

Photo by César Béjar

social ground floor area

social ground floor area

Photo by César Béjar

dining double-height ceiling

dining double-height ceiling

Photo by César Béjar

first floor interior gallery

first floor interior gallery

Photo by César Béjar

view towards main entrance

view towards main entrance

Photo by César Béjar

master bedroom walk in closet

master bedroom walk in closet

Photo by César Béjar

pool area

pool area

Photo by César Béjar


10 Cool Pools That Beat the Heat in Scorching Locations

Permalink - Posted on 2022-08-18 15:32

Check out these plunge-ready oases from Joshua Tree to Los Cabos.

On the outskirts of Grândola—a small Alentejan town in the Setúbal district of Portugal—a dramatic architectural form sits in the vast, arid landscape amidst cork trees and herds of cows. The whitewashed guesthouse is known as Casa da Volta, which translates as "Home of the Return,

It’s getting hotter out there. This summer alone, temperatures reached record-breaking highs all over the country—the world, even. On days when it’s too hot to crack a window and the air conditioning won’t cut it, a cool body of water is the cure. Here, find 10 homes in hot places with highly covetable pools.

In Mexico, a Modern Palapa and Pool Are Carved Into a Rocky Slope

The firm envisioned the pool as a spot where water floods the stone, "almost in a way of a pond remaining after the turning tides."

At a residence in Mexico, architecture firm CDM Casas de Mexico envisioned the pool as a spot where water floods the stone, "almost in a way of a pond remaining after the turning tides." 

Courtesy of CDM

Situated on five acres in the Mojave Desert about 10 minutes from Joshua Tree, this three-bedroom dwelling was originally built in 1987 and recently underwent a head-to-toe renovation. <span style="font-family: Theinhardt, -apple-system, BlinkMacSystemFont, &quot;Segoe UI&quot;, Roboto, Oxygen-Sans, Ubuntu, Cantarell, &quot;Helvetica Neue&quot;, sans-serif;">In the backyard, the shipping container Modpool is controlled by a smart-tech system which allows it to double as a jacuzzi</span><span style="font-family: Theinhardt, -apple-system, BlinkMacSystemFont, &quot;Segoe UI&quot;, Roboto, Oxygen-Sans, Ubuntu, Cantarell, &quot;Helvetica Neue&quot;, sans-serif;">.</span>

Situated on five acres in the Mojave Desert about 10 minutes from Joshua Tree, a three-bedroom dwelling originally built in 1987 recently underwent a head-to-toe renovation. In the backyard, the shipping container, from Modpool, is controlled by a smart-tech system which allows it to double as a hot tub.

Photo by Jose Cruz for Sotheby's International Realty

While not connected to the house's irrigation, the saltwater pool has its own solar-powered saline pump and cleansing system.

Nestled in the enchanting East Cape region of Los Cabos, Hawks Nest House by FabrikG takes design cues from the landscape. "For us, the place, the land itself, is very revealing," says architect Gonzalo Elizarraras. Building materials were locally sourced to create a home that naturally extends from the terrain. Local stone and rammed earth make up the structure’s walls and foundation. Polished concrete floors create a monochromatic look that draws from and reflects the deserts of Baja. The home’s saltwater pool features views out over the Sea of Cortez, and has its own solar-powered saline pump and cleansing system.

Photo by Paola López González

The choice of materials for their tactile qualities extended to the pool. "The same marble that's outside is inside of the swimming pool," says Loperena. "So, you look into it, and you immediately feel cool looking at it. And you go in and you feel it."

From the exposed concrete and stone walls outside, to the polished concrete, wood cabinetry, and sculpted marble sinks inside, material selection in this spectacular home on the island of Milos was guided by how the materials felt in hand. These choices extended to the pool. "The same marble that’s outside is inside of the swimming pool," says Loperena. "So, you look into it, and you immediately feel cool looking at it. And you go in and you feel it."

Photo by Yiorgis Yerolymbos

On the outskirts of Grândola—a small Alentejan town in the Setúbal district of Portugal—a dramatic architectural form sits in the vast, arid landscape amidst cork trees and herds of cows. The whitewashed guesthouse is known as Casa da Volta, which translates as "Home of the Return,

On the outskirts of Grândola—a small Alentejan town in the Setúbal district of Portugal—a dramatic architectural form sits in the vast, arid landscape amidst cork trees and herds of cows. The whitewashed guesthouse, known as Casa da Volta, which translates as "Home of the Return," offers a refreshing new take on rural living. Among the home’s many notable features is a pool with a strikingly geometric form that contrasts with the rawness of the surrounding landscape.  

Photo by Alexandre Ramos

This also made it possible to include a pool that seamlessly joins with the rear terrace, since the rocky terrain prevented excavation work.

Taller de Arquitectura Contextual built a 452-square-foot home in Mexico that’s just right for two. Rough stucco mixed with artisanal paint conveys warmth and texture, while precisely placed apertures connect the interior to the remote setting. "The objective was to achieve a reflective and contemplative place that links the occupant with the surrounding wild landscape," said the firm. By building the house on a platform, the architects at Taller de Arquitectura Contextual were able to include a pool that seamlessly joins with the rear terrace.

Photo by Leo Espinosa

"Since we're completely off grid we operate off of hauled water, so we have three 1,800 gallon tanks that get filled up every other week. But for those same reasons, people off the grid don't really have pools because they're hard to maintain, but we did it anyway."

In 2016, Rich Cook and Rezeta Veliu stumbled upon a dilapidated property in the middle of the Californian desert—the perfect foundation for their dreams of living off-the-grid. The couple enlisted the help of Don Gulley, a local contractor, to develop an entire off-grid building system for the project. Working alongside the contracting team, Rich and Rezeta’s home design expanded far beyond the original structure; the build added an entire other level, a solar-powered electrical grid, and a nearly unheard-of off-grid luxury: a swimming pool.

Courtesy of Rich Cook and Rezeta Veliu

The pool feels as laterally finite as the house feels spacious—but the view goes up forever.

The pool of this geometric home by Wendell Burnette is enclosed by 13-foot-high walls and feels as laterally finite as the house feels spacious—but the view up goes on forever. Light filtering through holes cut in the base of the pool’s perimeter bounces from the water onto the far wall, creating a sort of aquatic fireplace display.

Photo: Dean Kaufman

The four panels of aquamarine and green look like a work of art.

When a couple approached São Paulo–based Fernanda Marques Arquitetos Associados to redesign their duplex apartment, they were seeking a design versatile and minimalist enough to accommodate their ever-growing art collection and have it harmoniously blend into the interior concept. One of the most striking features in the 5,135-square-feet home is the glass-walled swimming pool. Sited in the exterior garden, it goes across the front and center of the living room to create an aquarium-like wall.

Courtesy of Fillippo Bamberghi

To most eyes, Ezequiel Farca’s 1970s-style concrete home in Mexico City looked like a teardown. Even the lot itself—shallow and crammed against a steep hillside—wasn’t particularly alluring. But Farca saw through all the restraints to create a spa-like refuge in one of the world’s most energetic cities. "It’s is such a hectic place. You’re bombarded by so much information the moment you step into the streets," says Farca, who first gained prominence as a furniture and interior designer. "So we envisioned this house as a retreat, a kind of a temple." The rooftop courtyard is lined with a verdant mix of indigenous plants, including banana trees, palm trees, lion’s claw, Mexican breadfruit, and native vines. The chaise longues were designed for Farca’s EF Collection.

To most eyes, Ezequiel Farca’s 1970s-style concrete home in Mexico City looked like a teardown. Even the lot itself—shallow and crammed against a steep hillside—wasn’t particularly alluring. But Farca saw through all the restraints to create a spa-like refuge in one of the world’s most energetic cities. "It’s is such a hectic place. You’re bombarded by so much information the moment you step into the streets," says Farca, who first gained prominence as a furniture and interior designer. "So we envisioned this house as a retreat, a kind of a temple." The rooftop courtyard is lined with a verdant mix of indigenous plants and a plunge-worthy pool.

Photo: Grant Harder


Frank Lloyd Wright’s Beloved Hollyhock House Reopens After Two Years

Permalink - Posted on 2022-08-18 15:04

The official celebration is Saturday, but the only UNESCO World Heritage Site in L.A. is welcoming visitors again.

As Wright’s first L.A. project, the iconic Hollyhock House was built between 1919 and 1921 and was filled with challenges from beginning to end. Enter Aline Barnsdall, the wealthy oil heiress and arts patron who held the dream of having a live-in venue to produce her own avant-garde plays. Wright wanted to create a design that would be defined by the region and that took advantage of Southern California's temperate climate. To do this, each interior space is echoed with an exterior space in the form of pergolas, porches, outdoor sleeping quarters, glass doors, and rooftop terraces that look out to the Hollywood Hills and the Los Angeles Basin.

After a two-year closure brought on by the pandemic, Frank Lloyd Wright’s Hollyhock House is open to visitors. One of eight designs by Wright in Los Angeles, it’s his first for the city, built between 1919 and 1921 for oil heiress Aline Barnsdall. It’s also L.A.’s first and only UNESCO World Heritage Site, a title the home earned in 2019.

Hollyhock House (1918, Los Angeles, California). This residence, the architect's first commission in Southern California, revolves around a central patio and contains multiple rooftop terraces.

Returning guests to East Hollywood’s Barnsdall Art Park, where the landmark home is located, will notice some improvements. During its closure, the home underwent a number of conservation projects, including the restoration of its art-glass balcony doors and bas-relief fireplace, which brings together classical elements of earth, air, fire and water.

The home’s guest house, known as Residence A, also saw a significant restoration, from its exterior stone to its cantilevered balcony.

The home’s previous restoration in 2014 focused on repairing structural elements like a leaky roof, and addressing deferred maintenance of its fenestration and wood detailing.

In an attempt to create a strong connection to nature, Wright incorporated outdoor sleeping porches on all five of the bays.

In an attempt to create a strong connection to nature, Wright incorporated outdoor sleeping porches on all five of the home’s bays.

Photo: Emma Geiszler

Created as the centerpiece of LA’s Barnsdall Art Park, the Hollyhock House (constructed 1918-1921) served as the personal residence for oil heiress Aline Barnsdall, who wanted her favorite flower, the hollyhock, incorporated into the home’s design. Although the Hollyhock House was completed just eleven years after the Robie House, the building is strikingly different from his Prairie School Style from the previous decade.

The home gets its name from Aline Barnsdall’s favorite flower, the hollyhock, which was incorporated into the detailing of the home.

Joshua White

Hollyhock House, view looking southeast in living room, with garden court (at left) beyond.

This view from the living room looks southeast, with a garden court beyond.

Courtesy of Frank Lloyd Wright Building Conservancy

Self-guided tours start August 18 and run weekly Thursdays through Saturdays from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. To celebrate the reopening, the home is throwing a lawn party this Saturday, hosted by the City of L.A. Department of Cultural Affairs (DCA) and city councilmember Mitch O’Farrell.

 The community event also marks the long-awaited reopening of the DCA’s other facilities in Barnsdall Park, including the Los Angeles Municipal Art Gallery and the Barnsdall Gallery Theatre.

Advance tickets can be purchased through the home’s website.

The view of the interior courtyard. To mark the occasion of the reopening, Mayor Eric Garcetti and Councilmember Mitch O’Farrell will lead an Official Ribbon Cutting Ceremony with the project’s collaborators at 4:00 p.m. at the Hollyhock House on February 13, 2015. Following this, for one night only, the City of Los Angeles and the Barnsdall Art Park Foundation will open Hollyhock House for self-guided tours for 24 hours, commencing at 4:00 p.m. on February 13 until 4:00 p.m. on February 14, 2015. Visitors are invited to enjoy the event and share with others via social media with the #WrightAtNight hashtag.
#franklloydwright #hollyhock #iconichouses

#franklloydwright #hollyhock #iconichouses

Photo: Emma Geiszler

Many of the elements throughout are recognized as being influenced by his Prairie houses, including built-in furnishings, a substantial amount of wood throughout, and art glass. The dining set was created custom by Wright and features a low seat and straight back—both signs of the Prairie style—but also boasts the Hollyhock motif running up the spine of the chair and the table’s pedestal.

The detailing inside reflect Wright’s Prairie houses, and includes built-in furnishings, a substantial amount of wood throughout, and art glass. The dining set was also designed by Wright and features a low seat and straight back—both signs of the Prairie style—but also boasts the hollyhock motif on the spine of the chair and the table’s pedestal.

Photo: Emma Geiszler

The living room glows in the afternoon light. Philanthropist, art collector, and Pennsylvania oil heiress Aline Barnsdall deeded her 36 acres of land, on which Hollyhock house sits (now known as Barnsdall Park) as well as its Frank Lloyd Wright–designed structures as a permanent home for the appreciation of art and architecture to the City of Los Angeles in 1927.
Hollyhock House is the first house of Wright’s second period and his first residence in Southern California. Named for Barnsdall’s favorite flower, the Hollyhock is incorporated throughout the design scheme of the residence.

The recently completed restoration is an important historical revelation for first-time visitors and regulars alike. Visitors will be able to see and experience the house in much of its original splendor. Floors, windows, doors, decorative molding, and long-forgotten paint colors have been re-created with utmost attention to detail and original intent. The latest phase of renovation took place from 2008 though 2014, with a total of $4,359,000 spent on conservation efforts. Hollyhock House is operated by the City of Los Angeles Department of Cultural Affairs (DCA).

After it reopens on February 13, 2015, Hollyhock House will feature self-guided “Walk Wright In” tours on Thursdays through Sundays from 11:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. for a fee of $7 for adults, $3 for students and seniors with identification, and $3 for children under 12 when accompanied by a paying adult. Special arrangements may be made for docent-led tours, group tours, guided tours, and other engagements by calling 323.913.4031. Click here for more information on the tours.
Reopening Friday, February 13th, 2015: For one night only, the City of Los Angeles and the Barnsdall Art Park Foundation will open Hollyhock House for self-guided tours for 24 hours, starting at 4:00 pm on February 13th. The admission fee will be waived for the first night through 11am on February 14, 2015.
With the approval from Barnsdall, Wright incorporated Japanese influences throughout, including a set of authentic 18th-century Japanese screens. However, since the originals were stolen during the house’s dark years, the ones seen here are reproductions.

With the approval from Barnsdall, Wright incorporated Japanese influences throughout, including a set of authentic 18th-century Japanese screens. However, since the originals were stolen during the house’s dark years, the ones seen here are reproductions.

Photo: Emma Geiszler

Since Wright was simultaneously working on the Japanese Imperial Hotel, he incorporated many Japanese details in the design of the Hollyhock House. Along with the Japanese screens in the living room, he also proudly placed a Buddhist sculpture at the end of a long hallway that’s lined with art glass.

Since Wright was simultaneously working on the Japanese Imperial Hotel, he incorporated many Japanese details in the design of the Hollyhock House. Along with the Japanese screens in the living room, he also proudly placed a Buddhist sculpture at the end of a long hallway that’s lined with art glass.

Photo: Emma Geiszler

The thoughtful repetition of the hollyhock motif was quite astonishing and couldn’t be ignored wherever we went. Even the rug, which was also designed by Wright, featured the motif with a range of bright colors. The original rug (this is a reproduction) was built as one large piece that covered the living room and the extended spaces surrounding it. The fact that there was no seams and that it was laid in one piece made it a work of art on its own.

A rug designed by Wright features the hollyhock motif with a range of bright colors. The original rug (this is a reproduction) was built as one large piece that covered the living room and the extended spaces surrounding it. The fact that there was no seams and that it was laid in one piece made it a work of art on its own.

Photo: Emma Geiszler

Since Barnsdall was such a strong-minded woman who knew what she wanted, she only let Wright design the furnishings for two of the rooms, including the living room and the dining room. The rest of the house was filled with items she had collected throughout her travels.

Barnsdall only allowed Wright to design the furnishings for two of the rooms, including the living room and the dining room. The rest of the house was filled with items she had collected throughout her travels.

Joshua White

One of the standout moments in the space is the cast concrete fireplace, which is considered to be one of Wright’s greatest two-dimensional works of art. Depicting an abstract landscape, the detail is spectacular, yet leaves much to the imagination while incorporating a bit of the hollyhock flower. Wright completed the fireplace with a skylight above and a moat in front that was designed to hold a pool of water. This was originally part of an elaborate water scheme to run throughout the property, though it was never completed. Regardless, the fireplace thus incorporated the four elements of nature: light, earth, fire, and water—making it a brilliant vision, even if it never ended up the way it was fully imagined.

One of the standout moments in the space is the cast concrete fireplace, which is considered to be one of Wright’s greatest two-dimensional works of art. Depicting an abstract landscape, the detail is spectacular, yet leaves much to the imagination while incorporating a bit of the hollyhock flower. Wright completed the fireplace with a skylight above and a moat in front that was designed to hold a pool of water. This was originally part of an elaborate water scheme to run throughout the property, though it was never completed. Regardless, the fireplace thus incorporated the four elements of nature: light, earth, fire, and water—making it a brilliant vision, even if it never ended up the way it was fully imagined.

Photo: Emma Geiszler

The Hollyhock House was one of the last residences where Wright designed a comprehensive art glass window scheme that’s carried throughout the residence. Throughout the property, there are 130 examples of this.

The Hollyhock House was one of the last residences where Wright designed a comprehensive art glass window scheme that’s carried throughout the residence. Throughout the property, there are 130 windows.

Photo: Emma Geiszler

The hollyhock motifs lining the exterior of the building were thought to have been created on-site by combining dry natural materials with water into a mold that would then form into the desired shape. The use of clay created the look and feel of concrete that’s clearly influenced by pre-Columbian indigenous architecture.

The hollyhock motifs lining the exterior of the building were thought to have been created on-site by combining dry natural materials with water into a mold that would then form into the desired shape. The use of clay created the look and feel of concrete, and the design is reminiscent of pre-Columbian indigenous architecture.

Photo: Emma Geiszler

The exterior grounds of Frank Lloyd Wright's Hollyhock House.

The exterior grounds of Frank Lloyd Wright's Hollyhock House.

Photo: Emma Geiszler


She Started One of America’s Best Design Stores. Now, She Wants to Help You Do You

Permalink - Posted on 2022-08-17 21:17

Shannon Maldonado, the founder of Philly shop Yowie, tells all about the TV show she’s pitching to inspire your next big idea.

Charisma is something you either have, or you don’t. And Shannon Maldonado has it. Fans and followers of the Philadelphia native’s boutique design shop, Yowie, will be familiar with her magnetic charm and candor through the announcements she posts to Instagram, or IRL visits to the storefront and pop-ups she’s hosted across the city. (Add eloquence to her list of talents, a skill learned in a past life in corporate fashion presenting to executives, she says). Safe to say, there’s no camera-shyness here. But only recently did she decide to broadcast her on-screen confidence through more traditional channels.

In July, Maldonado, ever the entrepreneur, announced the concept for Small Enough, a television series that peels back the curtain on small businesses and their creators to expose what they’re building, and how they’re doing it. The pilot paints an exciting picture of Philly’s self-starter scene. We meet Lindsey Scannapieco, an urban developer focused on unconventional adaptive reuse projects with her company, Scout, who tells us about the time she used a kiddie pool to keep beer cold for an event. After a refreshingly candid chat, Maldonado takes us on a field trip to meet with her (very funny) contractor at a historic building she’s turning into an 11-room hotel. She’ll be the first to tell you that she’s just figuring it out as she goes.

"So many small-business owners that I talk to, we’re all like, ‘Oh my god, we don’t know what we’re doing,’" she says. "When you’re running a small business, 100 percent of it is learned on the job."

In the pilot episode for <i>Small Enough, </i>Shannon Maldonado interviews Lindsey Scannapieco, an entrepreneur and founder of Scout, a company turning old spaces into new ventures for creative businesses in Philadelphia.

In the pilot episode for Small Enough, Shannon Maldonado interviews Lindsey Scannapieco, an entrepreneur and founder of Scout, a company turning old spaces into new ventures for creative businesses in Philadelphia.

Courtesy of Shannon Maldonado

The show, in fact, didn’t even start as a show. Maldonado was talking with a good friend, Nathan Nedorostek, about how to grow her brand during the pandemic, and the two ended up creating a pitch deck for a series of Instagram clips that would track her moves—a "how it started, how it’s going" kinda thing. It’d be a way to create content while providing anyone at earlier stages of a start-up with a blueprint to finding their way in the small-biz world.

Maldonado rehearses lines outside her Philadelphia design shop, Yowie, which has amassed a cult following since opening five years ago.

Maldonado rehearses lines for the pilot outside her Philadelphia design shop, Yowie, which has amassed a cult following since opening five years ago.

Courtesy of Shannon Maldonado

But Yowie was founded with a spirit of collaboration—the store showcases local designers with a rising-tide-lifts-all-boats approach—and Maldonado has always sought to uplift the artists and makers that surround her. At one point, her web shop even had a button called "Life Advice" that invited people to ask whatever was on their minds; oftentimes they wanted to know how to start and run a small business.

All of this led her and Nedorostek to a different idea: Maldonado as host of a series wherein she meets other budding and experienced entrepreneurs at eye level. Nedorostek would executive produce alongside another friend, Sean Sullivan, who wrote the script and music for the pilot.

Maldonado is in the

Her latest venture is the renovation of an 11-room hotel and cafe that will be curated with a rotation of wares from artists and makers.

Courtesy of Shannon Maldonado

"I started to feel strongly about that idea," says Maldonado. "I wanted to find commonalities across the board with other creatives, but also learn about what they’re doing differently. That’s a big part of what we hope to discover in the series."

There isn’t one to speak of—at least not yet. But if the pilot for Small Enough is any indication, an entire season—or several, if we dare to dream—could serve as a trove of inspiration and information that quashes doubt and disbelief in the hearts of anyone interested in starting a small business. Five years ago, that was Maldonado, Yowie but a twinkle in her eye.

At the end of the pilot, Maldonado bids us farewell as a bus approaches (she doesn’t drive, and doesn’t seem to want to). But instead of pulling over, the bus just cruises on by and leaves her on the sidewalk to figure out what’s next. Lucky for Maldonado, it’s a skill she’s been developing for most of her life.

Creative work takes a village. Kneeling in front are second camera Ryan Cambage and director of photography AJ Quon, and in the back row are Shannon, executive producer Sean Sullivan, and director Jason Douglas Bainbridge.

Creative work takes a village. The cast and crew for Small Enough are: Ryan Cambage, second camera, and AJ Quon, director of photography, both kneeling in front, with Shannon, executive producer Sean Sullivan, and director Jason Douglas Bainbridge behind them.

Courtesy of Shannon Maldonado


A 1912 Home With a Net-Zero Retrofit Seeks $1.8M in British Columbia

Permalink - Posted on 2022-08-17 17:29

Turn-of-the-century details meet next-gen technologies in this charming dwelling designed to produce more energy than it consumes.

The home's blue-painted facade pops against the crisp white exterior trim.

Location: 2654 Fernwood Road, Victoria, British Columbia 

Price: $1,850,000

Year Built: 1912

Footprint: 2,084 square feet (three bedrooms, two baths)

From the agent: "Built in 1912, 2654 Fernwood Road is an anomaly. The home reimagined by Scott & Scott Architects of Vancouver received a complete net-zero retrofit by Frontera Homes. This is an all-electric home. All of the mechanical systems, insulation, roof, windows, plumbing, electrical service, and wiring are new, including a dual-zone Mitsubishi heat pump, Rheem heat pump water heater, Zender HRV, Stûv low-emission wood stove, Veridian solar panel system, and triple-pane Loewen windows. The house generates 110% of the power it uses—putting energy back into the grid."

The home's blue-painted facade pops against the crisp white exterior trim.

The home’s blue-painted facade pops against the crisp white exterior trim.

Photo by Tyler Cave

Photo by Tyler Cave

Natural light pours inside thanks to large windows spanning across the main living areas.

Natural light pours inside thanks to large windows that span the main living areas.

Photo by Tyler Cave

Photo by Tyler Cave

In addition to high ceilings and all new appliances, the kitchen also offers wraparound counters and open shelving.

The kitchen offers high ceilings, all-new appliances, wraparound counters, and open shelving.

Photo by Tyler Cave

Photo by Tyler Cave

A peek at one of the home's three bedrooms.

A peek at one of the home’s three bedrooms.

Photo by Tyler Cave

Photo by Tyler Cave

Another bedroom is located on the upper level where the home's original post-and-beam structure is on display.

Another bedroom is located on the upper level, where the home’s original post-and-beam structure is on display.

Photo by Tyler Cave

Photo by Tyler Cave

2654 Fernwood Road in Victoria, British Columbia, is currently listed for $1,850,000 by Richard G. Acomba M Ed.

Read more about the home’s history , renovation, and performance on the property’s website.


Before & After: A Breakthrough Renovation Reveals a Parisian Apartment’s Good Bones

Permalink - Posted on 2022-08-17 17:11

Architect Olivier Lekien tears down a wall to expose the wood structure—and join the interiors—of a historic residence in the 11th arrondissement.

The original wood columns and beams create a more open feel and flood the spaces with natural light. "The kitchen looks out over the courtyard, which acts as a light well and provides ventilation,

The 1,109-square-foot apartment in the 11th arrondissement of Paris held a warren of dark, dated, and awkward rooms—until architect Olivier Lekien transformed it into an open and sunny space filled with warm architectural details.

Lekien’s client, a professional in his 30s, was drawn to the apartment for its locale. "The 11th arrondissement is a lively neighborhood known for its bar and restaurant scene," the architect says. "Rue Amelot is one of the area’s hidden gems, running from the Place de la République to the Bastille district—it’s dotted with eclectic shops, cafés, boutiques, and some of the best bistros on the Right Bank."

Before: Kitchen and Dining Area

When architect Olivier Lekien redesigned a Paris apartment in the 11th arrondissement, he discovered a system of wood columns and beams that separated the kitchen-and-dining area from the living room.

As architect Olivier Lekien renovated an apartment in the 11th arrondissement of Paris, he discovered a system of wood columns and beams that separated the kitchen/dining area from the living room.

Photo by Atelier olk

The architect removed the wall material that wrapped the existing wood framework, giving the spaces warmth and texture.

The architect removed the wall material that wrapped the existing framework, showcasing the warmth and texture of the wood.

Photo by Atelier olk

The building that holds the apartment is as compelling as the neighborhood. "The entry is distinguished by a sculpted stone frieze atop a monumental wood door," Lekien says. "The building dates from 1778, and along with the Cirque d’Hiver, is one of two remaining historic monuments in the area. It was constructed as part of the late 18th-century urban planning project known as the Nouvelle Ville d’Angoulême."

One of the building’s more impressive features is a circular street-level courtyard that was once a stable. "The form of the courtyard gives each apartment a unique character," Lekien says.

After: Kitchen and Dining Area

The original wood columns and beams create a more open feel and flood the spaces with natural light. "The kitchen looks out over the courtyard, which acts as a light well and provides ventilation,

The original wood columns and beams create a more open feel and flood the spaces with natural light. "The kitchen looks out over the courtyard, which acts as a light well and provides ventilation," Lekien explains.

Photo by Rodrigo Apolaya

When Lekien first laid eyes on the apartment’s interior, he saw that it, too, had a unique character—despite its dated qualities. "The wood floors had a very dark varnish, and outdated carpeting covered the bedroom floors," he says. "The wall surfaces had not been cared for or repainted, and had acquired a yellow tint—but it was easy to see the residence’s potential." 

The architect was also struck by the space’s impressive system of structural wood beams, its high ceilings, the stone facade, and a curved wall created by the circular courtyard.

Just outside the apartment is a circular courtyard area. Lekien moved the kitchen from the rear of the apartment to the front so that it runs along the curved wall and connects to the outdoors.

Just outside the apartment is a circular courtyard area. Lekien moved the kitchen from the rear of the apartment to the front so that it runs along the curved wall and connects to the outdoors.

Photo by Rodrigo Apolaya

Before: Living Room

The structural wood framework also helps to delineate the kitchen-and-dining area from the large, sunlight-filled living room.

The structural wood framework helps to delineate the kitchen/dining area from the large, sunlight-filled living room.

Photo by Atelier olk

Lekien knew instantly that he wanted his redesign to incorporate the curved wall and the structural wood beams and columns. "The client wanted to maintain these things, too," he says. "It was important that we reveal the unit’s historical features, but in a way that interacted seamlessly with contemporary fixtures and finishes that also appealed to the client." 

After: Living Room

The architect dressed the living room with a soft palette of cream and blush tones. The parquet flooring offers subtle pattern and more texture for the space.

The architect dressed the living room with a soft palette of cream and blush tones. The parquet flooring introduces subtle pattern to the space.

Photo by Rodrigo Apolaya

The architect began his redesign by swapping the locations of the kitchen and one of the bedrooms, and removing the wall material that covered some of the structural wood beams and columns. The design move opened up the floor plan and flooded the kitchen, dining area, and living room with sunlight.

"We achieved a greater sense of space by revealing the wood framework located between the living room and the new kitchen/dining area," Lekien says. "The visible wood structure is not perceived as a wall, which creates the impression of one large space versus separate rooms. The new, open configuration also maximizes daylight."

After: Bedroom

The bedroom displays more existing wood ceiling beams and a storage loft above the bathroom.

The bedroom displays more existing wood ceiling beams and a storage loft above the bathroom.

Photo by Rodrigo Apolaya

The new custom kitchen runs along the curved wall, which the architect maintained. "The previous floor plan didn’t use the curved wall to its advantage or highlight its unique character," Lekien explains. "In the new configuration, not only is the wooden framework revealed, but the interior now has a relationship to the building—the resident can appreciate the courtyard’s circular form and be reminded of the way it informs the apartment."

An arched doorway between one of the bedrooms and a bathroom lends a soft, modern quality.

An arched doorway between one of the bedrooms and a bathroom lends the space a soft, contemporary quality.

Photo by Rodrigo Apolaya

Lekien also added a bathroom, a walk-in closet for one of the bedrooms, and a mezzanine for storage. He selected polished parquet flooring and finished some of the walls with plaster. The kitchen features MDF cabinetry with oak joinery, and the bathrooms are outfitted with polished concrete floors, oak shelving, and a waxed concrete vanity. "There were stone walls and a coffered ceiling that were in good shape, so we left those intact," Lekien says. "We also restored the existing crown moldings."

After: Bathroom

Lekien designed a built-in concrete vanity for the bathroom, creating a minimalist aesthetic for the space.

Lekien designed a built-in concrete vanity with integrated shelving for this bathroom.

Photo by Rodrigo Apolaya

Lekien’s goal for the redesign of the apartment was to enhance its existing architectural qualities and historic features that had been previously ignored or covered up. He also sought to pay tribute to the apartment’s lively context by creating contemporary counterpoints. "The design showcases the wood structural framework, and the new custom kitchen highlights the curved wall and the courtyard just outside," he says. "At the same time, the polished concrete, wood joinery, and light wood details are subtle but identifiable elements of the new. They inject a youthful touch, which is in line with the identity of the neighborhood."

Floor Plan of Ame Apartment by Atelier OLK


A Massachusetts Architect’s 1963 Family Home Still Feels Ahead of Its Time

Permalink - Posted on 2022-08-17 16:45

Known for designing college buildings, Earl Flansburgh experimented with a courtyard plan in the making of his modernist home.

Built in 1963, the Flansburgh House remains an architectural gem within Lincoln, Mass.

Houses We Love: Every day we feature a remarkable space submitted by our community of architects, designers, builders, and homeowners.

Project Details:

Location: Lincoln, Massachusetts

Architect: Earl R. Flansburgh

Footprint: 2,382 square feet

From the Homeowner: "Earl Flansburgh was a modernist architect in the Boston area for nearly half a century. Throughout his career, he advocated for his profession, serving as the president of Boston Society of Architects in the early ’80s.

"Flansburgh + Associates primarily designed institutional buildings, such as the Boston College Library (1997) and the subterranean Cornell University Campus Store (1971). Mr. Flansburgh rarely took on residential clients, however in 1963 he designed a home for his own family which came to be known as the Flansburgh House.

"Built in Lincoln, Massachusetts, within a wooded area, the home features a courtyard surrounded by interior windows which beckon the outdoors into every area of the house. Today, the all-white structure is highlighted by striking yellow bands that run along the vertical side of the windows.

"The home’s floor plan was featured in a 1966 issue of Better Homes & Gardens, offering a glimpse into Flansburgh’s architectural approach: He placed bedrooms and bathrooms on one side of the home, and living areas and the kitchen on the other. Connecting the two is the home’s entrance, courtyard, as well as a playroom area for he and his wife Polly’s two young children.

"Inside, the home features architectural curiosities that still resonate today: An accordion wall can transform the open entryway into a private space with courtyard views. Another stand-out design element is a curved wall that contains a hidden closet. The most surprising architectural detail, however, is the home’s underground tunnel leading to the garage, which was added in 1967.

"Although Flansburgh died in 2009, Polly subsequently secured an easement that ensures the house cannot be demolished or significantly altered."

Built in 1963, the Flansburgh House remains an architectural gem within Lincoln, Mass.

Built in 1963, the Flansburgh House remains an architectural gem within Lincoln, Mass.

Photo by Lara Kimmerer

Floor-to-ceiling windows are flanked by canary yellow panels which open to reveal screens in warm weather.

Floor-to-ceiling windows are flanked by canary yellow panels which open to reveal screens in warm weather.

Photo by Lara Kimmerer

In referencing the home's internal garden courtyard, Flansburgh said it "brings nature in on our terms."

In referencing the home's internal garden courtyard, Flansburgh said it "brings nature in on our terms."

Photo by Lara Kimmerer

Once the children's playroom, the sitting area can be made private with an articulating cork wall, original to the home.

Once the children's playroom, the sitting area can be made private with an articulating cork wall, original to the home.

Photo by Lara Kimmerer

Original light switches stack neatly within the wall's original wood slats.

Original light switches stack neatly within the wall's original wood slats.

Photo by Lara Kimmerer

While updated, the kitchen maintains its connection to its mid-century roots through pops of color used against a mostly neutral background.

While updated, the kitchen maintains its connection to its mid-century roots through pops of color used against a mostly neutral background.

Photo by Lara Kimmerer

The entryway connects the two sides of the home with a symmetrically framed courtyard view.

The entryway connects the two sides of the home with a symmetrically framed courtyard view.

Photo by Lara Kimmerer

The original curved wall that extends from the playroom to the dining area opens to reveal a hidden closet.

The original curved wall that extends from the playroom to the dining area opens to reveal a hidden closet.

Photo by Lara Kimmerer

A reading corner takes full advantage of floor-to-ceiling window light.

A reading corner takes full advantage of floor-to-ceiling window light.

Photo by Lara Kimmerer

Flansburgh's office and study still contain his original built-in desks and shelving.

Flansburgh's office and study still contain his original built-in desks and shelving.

Photo by Lara Kimmerer

The foyer contains a model of another Flansburgh project.

The foyer contains a model of another Flansburgh project.

Photo by Lara Kimmerer

A photo of Flansburgh on the desk.

A photo of Flansburgh on the desk.

Photo by Lara Kimmerer


How Adaptive Reuse Can Help Solve the Affordability Crisis

Permalink - Posted on 2022-08-17 15:40

Joe Bone of the Chicago-based firm LBBA believes that working with what’s been left behind can pave the way for the future.

In the war of words, policies and proposals aimed at solving America’s ongoing housing crisis, much of the fighting has centered around the all-important Development Question: whether new construction alone can bring down prices, or whether aggressive regulation is needed to control costs. Somewhat neglected in all the back and forth is a slight yet essential twist on the first option—whether existing buildings, ones already standing but un- or under-utilized, can be effectively transformed into residences, adding more units to the market without the ecological and social disruptions of building anew.

Enter Chicago firm Landon Bone Baker Architects (LBBA). Since its debut in the late 1980s, the office has made a specialty of affordable housing, designing dozens of multifamily projects around the Midwest; in the last decade, their portfolio has included not just ground-up buildings but an impressive list of adaptive reuse commissions, taking everything from abandoned hotels to decommissioned schools and reinventing them as subsidized homes for people with low incomes. 

A fixture at LBBA from the beginning, and a named principal there since 1998, Jeff Bone has been a key player in the firm’s turn to the adaptive housing model, proving again and again how creative thinking and resourceful design can produce quality homes in the unlikeliest of places. It isn’t always easy, but as the architect tells Dwell, the approach represents a critical weapon in the affordability arsenal.  

Tell us a little about the current housing scene in Chicago—the challenges, the advantages, what it’s like doing housing there.   

A big question! Like many cities, we’re experiencing huge gaps in affordable housing. The gaps appear across the whole spectrum of affordability, from very low-income people who might qualify for public housing, up through workforce housing, to families, even for the kind of people who work in our office—there’s a need for more affordable housing across the board. All these needs have been increasing even as the high-end housing in the city has gone through the roof.   

The good news is that Chicago has a richness of nonprofits who provide supportive services and build affordable projects. We have a lot of repeat clients that we’ve been working with for many years, and the current mayoral administration really has focused on the issue, as for example, with its Invest Southwest program, which is focusing on underserved neighborhoods and on the West and South Side, providing not only low-cost housing but entire mixed-use environments, like having a library under an apartment building. There’s a lot of innovation right now happening around these projects, and you’re seeing a lot of cool things.

The 37th Street School apartments in Milwaukee, WI.

The 37th Street School apartments in Milwaukee, WI.

Photo by Leslie Schwartz

Certainly one of those cool things (several of them actually) has been the adaptive reuse housing designs from LBBA. How did the firm first start doing this kind of work?

I think the one that really first got us charged up and excited about adaptive reuse was back in 1993, when we did a teenage shelter for [Chicago area non-profit] the Night Ministry. For that project, we took an old Victorian "six-flat," which was vacant, and inserted a 16 bed shelter with a community kitchen, semi-private bunks, built-in furniture, and consulting areas on the ground floor. It was then that we realized, Hey, you could take a lot of these old Chicago background buildings that are truly the fabric of the city and you could breathe new life into them. 

In the years after that, you started seeing a lot of affordable developers and non-profits on the lookout for existing buildings, thinking of new uses for them. There were obvious advantages: Chicago is a brick city, the buildings are solid—it’s a great palette to start with. Of course, at the beginning, a lot of those buildings were also more affordable to purchase.

Formerly the Carling Hotel, the single-room occupancy building has been reworked for low-income residents in Chicago’s Old Town neighborhood.

Formerly the Carling Hotel, the single-room occupancy building has been reworked for low-income residents in Chicago’s Old Town neighborhood.

Photo by Leslie Schwartz

That’s obviously changed a bit. Besides the cost of acquiring these properties, what are the particular challenges to doing residential conversions like these?

There’s challenges all the way through—interesting challenges, but tough ones. A lot of it has to do with updating the systems in the buildings, how to distribute new wiring and plumbing and mechanicals, all without disrupting the historic structure. We’re usually following some sort of sustainability metric, and that means adding insulation, new power plants, everything. We work with contractors early on to do investigative work, poke around, selectively deconstruct portions of the structures to understand how they’re built and make sure we make the right moves. It’s a balancing act, and you have to do it while keeping an eye on costs. From that perspective it’s much easier to build a new building: there’s so many fewer unknowns, which makes cost control so much easier to do. Naturally many developers find that more attractive. 

Which is unfortunate, right—it feels like there are so many abandoned buildings in American cities, you could fix the whole housing problem right there. How do you get over that initial obstacle and do reuse in a way that makes sense?

Ultimately, you need the right building and the right backing. Take our 37th St. School project, which we finished last year in Milwaukee. We started with a 1911 brick schoolhouse, right in the middle of a working-class neighborhood. What we’ve found is that schools are very well suited to reuse as housing: the depth is very easily translated into units, you have wide hallways for social interaction, and at 37th St. we were able to turn the gym into exercise and community spaces. Working with the Wisconsin Housing and Economic Development Authority, we were then able to secure not just Low-Income Housing Tax Credits, but also tax credits for historic buildings, since the school was on the national registry. So you need a bunch of things to come together—but when they do, the outcome is definitely more than the sum of its parts.  

A room at Buffett Place in Chicago. The building supplies affordable housing for those with mental illnesses or who are struggling to find housing.

A room at Buffett Place in Chicago. The building supplies affordable housing for those with mental illnesses or who are struggling to find housing.

Photo by Mark Ballogg

In 2019, we completed Harvest Commons, a conversion of a beautiful Art Deco hotel from the late 1920s [on the West Side of Chicago] that had been empty for over a decade. I was walking down the street shortly after it opened, and a man said to me, "This building is like Rip Van Winkle! It was asleep, and now it’s waking up." That’s the power of adaptive reuse housing projects, the way they can breathe life back into a neighborhood. Their effects go so much further than the property line.   

Top photo of the interior of the Marshall SRO project in Chicago by Mark Ballogg.

Related Reading: 

"You’re Finally Seeing Cracks in the NIMBY Armor"

Kansas City’s Tara Raghuveer Has a ‘North Star’ and It’s True Social Housing


9 Items to Level Up Your Laundry Room, According to Hannah Yokoji of The Laundress

Permalink - Posted on 2022-08-17 13:28

The brand director of the upscale all-natural detergent brand shares how to live your best clean life.

 Hannah Yokoji, brand director at detergent brand The Laundress, is all about investing in quality products. It’s part of the reason why she’s stayed at The Laundress for over six years, having started at the company as an intern; she believes in and is unwaveringly passionate about the products, which are all formulated from plant-derived, biodegradable, and allergen-free ingredients. When I ask her what sets The Laundress apart from other cleaning brands in the market, Yokoji tells me the team is dedicated to "exceptional fabric care," a surprising twist of an answer since I was expecting her to mention something along the lines of soaping technology or cleaning innovations. To be certain, The Laundress is all those things and more, but the emphasis has always been on fabric care and education so that customers could make empowered decisions when it comes to keeping their clothes fresh while being as gentle on the earth as possible (hat tip: sign up for The Laundress newsletters, which are always chock full of cleaning tips).  

Hannah Yokoji is Brand Director and has been an enthusiastic Laundress for over 6 years.

Hannah Yokoji is brand director at The Laundress.

Courtesy of The Laundress

"Even prior to working at The Laundress I was really into special clothing that were vintage or thrifted that I didn't trust in the washing machine, especially at the laundromat where you have less control over the cycle," says Yokoji. "So I would typically hand wash them in my bathroom and hang them to drip-dry in the bathtub. Laundering by hand has always been a relaxing experience for me because I felt like I was taking the best care of my pieces so they last."

The Laundress, as it turns out, was fitting for Yokoji who became obsessed with how to preserve and extend the lives of beloved threads. With access to the best-in-class detergent products and the knowledge of how to use them, it wasn’t long before Yokoji began to outfit her own laundry room with the most efficient items — a space-saving trash bin, a fashion industry-standard steamer, a squishy-on-the-feet mat, to name a few — that best suit her NYC apartment. It all goes back to investing in quality products.

"I know not everyone enjoys doing laundry, but you can find joy in taking care of something, right? And there are things that you can do to personalize and liven up your laundry space and make it functional and beautiful. So that has generally been my approach," Yokoji says of some of her favorite laundry-related items. "Whether it’s a waste bin or [installing better] lighting, there are little touches you can make to ease your routine and make laundry feel less like an overwhelming, daunting chore. It doesn't have to be the most expensive item, but as long as it's functional and works for you, then that's ultimately the goal." 

"A cushioned floor mat is an easy way to bring some personality to a laundry room and bring the space together. It also helps reduce standing fatigue when sorting, pretreating stains, and folding laundry."

House of Noa Ula Nama Standing Mat

Meet Ula, a Moroccan-inspired anti fatigue kitchen mat made for bohemian souls (and soles). With a neutral palette and organic, hand-illustrated design, this kitchen mat vibes with a range of interior styles—making it a win for free-spirited minimalists and maximalists, alike. Customize your home for comfort, use Ula in front of the kitchen sink or as a runner next to an island, in the office as a standing desk mat, or as a laundry room mat. The real magic happens underfoot, our anti fatigue mats have a signature, max-comfy ergonomic foam padding that makes prolonged standing on hard floors feel like a dream.

"It’s easier to enjoy doing laundry when your space is tidy. Keeping a nice trash bin nearby is convenient for emptying pockets, cutting off tags, and discarding packaging. This sleek trash can has a wide opening for regularly cleaning out dryer lint, and doubles as a small tabletop for keeping fabric care tools handy."

Yamazaki Home Tower Side Table Trash Can

Time to table your old trash can. Is it a table or a waste bin? Why not both! This side table is the perfect couch or bedside companion for holding a cup of coffee, alarm clock, cell phone, or other decoration. The table also features a wide opening, which you can face towards or away from the wall, for tossing in trash. Use the tabletop for holding your magazine, then recycle the issue using the bin within!

"New York City living means I don’t have the luxury of an in-unit washer and dryer, so this sturdy triple divider hamper on wheels is a godsend for sorting and rolling my family’s laundry to the basement. Having an efficient workspace is also crucial, and this one features a removable wooden lid that can be used as a folding table, side table, or extra surface to maximize space."

The Laundress Steele Canvas Triple Hamper With Folding Table

The ultimate hamper for storing, sorting, and folding! Our Steele Canvas Triple Divider Hamper is a stylish rolling bin that's designed to last and make laundering a breeze. It features three separate compartments for sorting laundry (Whites! Colors! Delicates!), plus a custom detachable Laundress-exclusive wooden lid that can be used as a folding table, side table, or extra surface to maximize space in your home. Constructed of canvas, supported by a steel frame, and finished with sleek white vinyl trim, our hamper looks chic when displayed or tucked away. Also great for household storage of toys, blankets, and more

"The high heat and agitation from tumble drying can lead to shrinkage, fading, and weakening of fabrics so I air dry whenever possible to preserve my garments. This sturdy folding rack stashes easily in a closet, and I particularly like the lay-flat mesh shelf for sweaters."

Honey Can Do Large Folding Wing Clothes Drying Rack

This eco-friendly alternative to energy-sucking dryers is equipped with 42 linear feet of drying space that can hold 18 to 20 garments or up to 50 lbs. The patented design features smooth fold hinges that allow the powder-coated steel wings to fold out into multiple positions for maximum drying space. It also boasts a mesh shelf for those delicate pieces that need to be laid flat to dry. Once everything is ready to be folded, the A-frame folds flat to 3” for easy storage. Unfortunately, this clothes airer can’t help you fold that load of laundry. But we’re sure you’ll get around to it (or leave them unfolded until your next laundry day—no judgment here!).

"This is the perfect introduction to expert garment care, with fabric-specific solutions to properly clean and preserve a variety of laundry loads—from everyday cotton, linen, and activewear to ‘dry clean only’ silk and cashmere. The thoughtfully-designed bottles are also a quick way to spruce up your space—you won’t mind leaving them out on display."

The Laundress Best Sellers Kit

For the first time ever we're bundling our bestselling detergents for the ultimate laundering experience. From activewear and everyday clothing to cashmere and "Dry Clean" items, tackle every laundry load with this collection of crowd favorites.

"There’s a reason the Jiffy steamer is part of any fashion industry toolkit–it’s a professional grade investment that will last. Steaming provides the safest finish for garments, quickly releasing wrinkles for a smooth finish. I frequently use the convenient garment hook to hang outfits for the day ahead, and the large water tank means fewer refills. Goodbye ironing!"

Jiffy J-2M Clothing Steamer

The Jiffy Steamer J-2M quickly and efficiently removes wrinkles from most fabrics and is perfect for home or light commercial use. Steam is the gentler alternative to ironing and is great for removing wrinkles from clothing, tablecloths, bedspreads and delicate materials. With a Jiffy Steamer, there is no need for a temperature setting like on an iron.

"These mesh bags are designed with a covered zipper flap for protection along with a gusset bottom for extra movement while machine washing. They’re perfect for protecting delicates and knits in the wash, and for corralling small items like socks and underwear (no more soggy socks found wedged in the door seal). I also use them to prevent items like delicate tops and high-end jeans from accidentally going in the dryer with the rest of my load."                       

The Laundress Mesh Bag Bundle

Protect wool, delicates, embellished items—even denim and activewear—from tangles and snags in the machine with our thoughtfully designed Mesh Washing Bags. These long-lasting fine-mesh bags won't catch on the machine drum, but provide enough movement for effective cleaning. The bundle includes one small bag, ideal for hosiery and lingerie, and one large bag, ideal for sweaters and larger items.

"The Aera allows me to enjoy my favorite Laundress scents beyond the laundry room and into the rest of my home. Its unique diffusion technology evenly releases top, middle, and base notes all at once for a comprehensive scent experience. I keep the No. 723 capsule running at the entrance of my apartment for a welcoming freshness that helps inspire me to do my laundry."

Aera Diffuser

Clean fragrance and aromatherapy diffuser system for medium to large-sized rooms.

"Towels are a laundry staple. The short, yet absorbent, pile of these plush organic towels helps expedite drying while minimizing lint transfer. I use them to absorb water from cashmere and other fine knits that can’t be tumble dried or hung. After washing, lay the item flat on a clean towel with the item in its original shape, and roll it up in the towel (like a sleeping bag) to remove excess water. Then, lay flat in its original shape to dry."

Coyuchi Air Weight Organic Towels

Our very first towel is also our most loved. Loomed from long loops of pure organic cotton, this best seller is the organic workhorse of the household, with a twill weave whose highs and lows create the perfect texture for drying off quickly and efficiently. Durable, dense, and exceptionally thirsty, Air Weight offers a brilliant range of colors that brighten the bathroom of those who seek superior absorbency and long-term performance.

We love the products we feature and hope you do, too. If you buy something through a link on the site, we may earn an affiliate commission.

More Expert Recs:

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This Sunny Los Angeles Home Defines “Scandifornian” Style

Permalink - Posted on 2022-08-16 22:18

Real estate guru and designer Rob Diaz blends Alaskan white cedar, high-end finishes, and earthy decor for a home as hygge as it is beachy.

Houses We Love: Every day we feature a remarkable space submitted by our community of architects, designers, builders, and homeowners.

Project Details:

Location: Los Angeles, California

Designer: Diaz + Alexander Studio / @robdiazdesignlosangeles

Furnishings and Decor: The Platform Experiment / @theplatformexperiment

Photographer: Todd Goodman / LA Light Photo / @lalightphoto

From the Architect: "Rob Diaz's latest project is a gorgeous new construction home in the Los Feliz neighborhood of Los Angeles, California. Rob and his team constructed the four-bedroom, four-and-a-half-bathroom home entirely out of Alaskan white cedar and infused the space with high-end materials and designer lighting. It’s truly a masterpiece.

"The 3,171-square-foot, "Scandifornian"-style home beautifully marries Scandinavian hygge with California modernism with its use of natural materials, neutral and earthy palette, and modern accessories and furnishings. The expansive kitchen features Corchia marble countertops, Wolf and Thermador appliances, Watermark plumbing fixtures, custom oak cabinetry, and pocket doors leading out to the impressive outdoor space. The primary suite is a homeowner’s oasis with its sleek wood paneling, oversized walk-in closet, bath with soaking tub, and open-air deck with incredible views of the Griffith Observatory.

"The lush exterior of the home has new drought tolerant landscaping, which was meticulously planned with Filetti limestone paving stones, raised planters, and mature Manzanilla olive trees. The stunning pool area features a wraparound teak deck with plenty of space for entertaining and a long black bottom pool with spa."

Photo by Todd Goodman / LA Light Photo

Photo by Todd Goodman / LA Light Photo

Photo by Todd Goodman / LA Light Photo

Photo by Todd Goodman / LA Light Photo

Photo by Todd Goodman / LA Light Photo

Photo by Todd Goodman / LA Light Photo

Photo by Todd Goodman / LA Light Photo

Photo by Todd Goodman / LA Light Photo

Photo by Todd Goodman / LA Light Photo

Photo by Todd Goodman / LA Light Photo

Photo by Todd Goodman / LA Light Photo

Photo by Todd Goodman / LA Light Photo

Photo by Todd Goodman / LA Light Photo

Photo by Todd Goodman / LA Light Photo

Photo by Todd Goodman / LA Light Photo

Photo by Todd Goodman / LA Light Photo

Photo by Todd Goodman / LA Light Photo

Photo by Todd Goodman / LA Light Photo

Photo by Todd Goodman / LA Light Photo

Photo by Todd Goodman / LA Light Photo

Photo by Todd Goodman / LA Light Photo


An ’80s Home With a Heart of Glass (Bricks) Lists for $1.9M

Permalink - Posted on 2022-08-16 19:47

Originally built in 1986 by local architect Robert Thompson, the house now sports an elegant revamp by Bright Designlab.

Location: 2725 SW Sherwood Drive, Portland, Oregon

Price: $1,885,000

Architect: Robert Thompson, TVA Architects

Year Built: 1986

Footprint: 3,922 square feet (four bedrooms, two-and-a-half baths)

Lot Size: 0.25 acres

From the agent: "An icon of ’80s modern architecture, this 1986 home in Portland Heights was originally designed by celebrated Portland architect Robert Thompson, founding principal of TVA Architects. The original home was composed of elegant, understated geometric forms featuring high ceilings, sweeping glass block walls and dramatic walls of glass that frame strategic views of the quiet, tree-filled Marquam Nature Park abutting the south property line. The house received an artful remodel in 2020 from the well-regarded Portland Interiors firm Bright Designlab, who seamlessly picked up where the original architecture left off, instilling a repeating motif of modern curves, custom details, and smart function, making this a true one-of-a-kind home."

Architect Robert Thompson built the home in 1986, just before he began the Nike World Campus project the following year.

Architect Robert Thompson built the home in 1986, just before he began the Nike World Campus project the following year. 

Photo by Jones Media Shop

Photo by Jones Media Shop

Architect Robert Thompson built the home in 1986, just before he began the Nike World Campus project the following year. Upon arrival, a custom front gate leads guests to an exterior entry court and two-story glass block wall.

A custom front gate leads to an exterior entry court and a two-story glass block wall.

Photo by Jones Media Shop

Photo by Jones Media Shop

A spacious foyer opens up to a double-height framed view of the Marquam woods at the rear of the home. "Thanks to the strategic placement of windows throughout, whether picture windows or high clerestories, you mostly see moss-covered tree trunks, fluttering leaves and branches, and little to no neighbors—making for a quiet, secluded setting for this 80's Mod architecture to pop,

A spacious foyer opens up to a double-height framed view of the Marquam woods at the rear of the home. "Thanks to the strategic placement of windows throughout, including picture windows and high clerestories, you mostly see moss-covered tree trunks, fluttering leaves and branches, and little to no neighbors—making for a quiet, secluded setting," notes the agent.

Photo by Jones Media Shop

Photo by Jones Media Shop

Photo by Jones Media Shop

Bright Designlab designed the kitchen to feature a large central island, topped with a custom marble slab from the “Lincoln Quarry.” White-oak custom cabinets rest beneath.

Bright Designlab updated the kitchen with a large central island, topped with a custom marble slab. White oak custom cabinets sit beneath.

Photo by Jones Media Shop

Glass blocks lining the front facade diffuses and softens the natural light, while also providing ample privacy.

The front facade is lined with glass blocks that diffuse and soften incoming daylight while providing ample privacy.

Photo by Jones Media Shop

Photo by Jones Media Shop

Bright Designlan designed the primary suite to have a bespoke, white-oak bed with slatted wall paneling and curving bedside tables, as well as a large en-suite bathroom with sauna.

Bright Designlab renovated the primary suite with a bespoke, white oak bed with slatted wall paneling and curving bedside tables, as well as a large en suite bathroom with sauna. 

Photo by Jones Media Shop

Photo by Jones Media Shop

Terrazzo counters and backsplash encompasses the curvilinear mirrors, while fluted white-oak storage with a cheeky orange toe add playful pops of color into the room.

The primary suite features terrazzo counters, curvilinear mirrors, and fluted white-oak storage with a cheeky orange toe.

Photo by Jones Media Shop

Photo by Jones Media Shop

2725 SW Sherwood Drive in Portland, Oregon, is currently listed for $1,885,000 by Jeff Weithman of RealEstateThroughDesign.com / (W)here.


13 Homes in Pinkish Orange Concrete Add a Splash of Color to Mexico City

Permalink - Posted on 2022-08-15 22:20

Architect Miguel de la Torre uses lattices and circular perforations to give a sense of lightness to the monolithic multiunit complex.

Houses We Love: Every day we feature a remarkable space submitted by our community of architects, designers, builders, and homeowners.

Project Details:

Location: Mexico City, Mexico

Architect: Miguel de la Torre Arquitectos / @mta__v

Photographer: Jaime Navarro / @jaimenavarrophotography

From the Architect: "Real de los Reyes is a group of houses located in the Coyoacan borough, south Mexico City. The area is full of recreational places for everyday life, from outdoor cafes, restaurants, art galleries, and ice cream parlors to tree-lined and cobblestone streets. Real de los Reyes is a complex of 13 houses, each 320 meters square and distributed over three levels, with ample parking, a roof garden, and patio.

"Real de los Reyes offers luxury and comfort for its inhabitants through its spacious plan, security system, and thoughtful architectural finishes. These features allow the homes to adapt to different lifestyles, families, and individuals. The versatile interior spaces are designed to meet the needs of daily life, and they offer the possibility of customizing the finishes. 

"The facade is made of orange pigmented concrete with a lattice with circular perforations that create a feeling of lightness and allow discrete connection with the outside. The characteristic color of the construction makes it a focus of attention when passing through the area."

Photo by Jaime Navarro

Photo by Jaime Navarro

Photo by Jaime Navarro

Photo by Jaime Navarro

Photo by Jaime Navarro

Photo by Jaime Navarro

Photo by Jaime Navarro

Photo by Jaime Navarro

Photo by Jaime Navarro

Photo by Jaime Navarro

Photo by Jaime Navarro

Photo by Jaime Navarro

Photo by Jaime Navarro

Photo by Jaime Navarro

Photo by Jaime Navarro


This Melbourne Home’s Topsy-Turvy Addition Is Buried Beneath the Earth

Permalink - Posted on 2022-08-15 20:32

Rather than building up, Mitsuori Architects digs deep to give a Victorian terrace house a subterranean extension.

"This renovation and extension focused on bringing two families together," says Mitsuori Architects cofounder Matthew Murfutt about his studio’s latest project. "Our client wanted this to be a place that represented a new start, and fostered a sense of identity and belonging."

The clients’ existing home, a modest freestanding Victorian-era terrace located in the Melbourne inner suburb of Northcote, sits amongst an eclectic mix of heritage homes. "Our clients’ key aim was to extend the house to accommodate a large family, but at the same time they wanted to minimize the impact of new building elements on the wonderful sense of openness in their back garden and the surrounding properties," says Murfutt.

This double-story addition to a detached Victorian house in Northcote creates a bridge between the existing building and its deep rear garden.

With this in mind, Murfutt sought to avoid the visual bulk associated with adding a typical two-story extension at the rear of the existing building. "This approach led us to go down instead of up, resulting in the creation of interesting spaces that better responded to the needs and aspirations of the occupants," he says.

Suffice it to say, this decision generated numerous construction challenges. The clients, one of whom is a commercial builder, were not deterred, and they requested that Mitsuori explore all manner of construction methods to achieve their goals. 

"Because we wanted to exaggerate the experience of descending the stair, it was designed to cut through the existing foundations, revealing a section of the wall above and below the ground—and this presented definite buildability challenges," explains Murfutt. "These were ultimately overcome with structural engineering and construction methodology not typically used in small residential alterations."

Northcote House by Mitsuori Architects / Stair detail

The other fundamental challenge was to create thoughtful transitions between the heritage and contemporary areas of the house. "It was important to us that the new addition reflected the functional and spatial qualities valued by the family, but also celebrated the transition between old and new," explains Murfutt. "The result is a light-filled pavilion that bridges the existing heritage home and garden with more private subterranean bedrooms areas below."

Northcote House by Mitsuori Architects / transition between old and new

The glass roof accentuates this transition by revealing the raw existing building fabric both above and below ground level. "The junction between old and new is treated as an unequivocal transition point in the building, and the two appear not to touch," Murfutt adds.

Northcote House by Mitsuori Architects / kitchen and study

From a planning perspective, the house is neatly divided into public and private with the main kitchen and dining space forming the communal heart of the home on the upper level. Positioning the bedrooms downstairs provided the architects with more freedom to manipulate the roof above the living areas, within the bounds of the relatively tight urban site.

Northcote House by Mitsuori Architects / kitchen

"We could freely sculpt the building envelope to create the angular ceiling form, and bring in an abundance of natural light to provide necessary sun shading without the need for active shading devices," says Murfutt. In contrast, a separate lounge, designed as a cozy, conversational space is tucked into the existing heritage house, separated from the noise of the main living zone.

Northcote House by Mitsuori Architects / Bathroom
Northcote House by Mitsuori Architects / Timber clad wall in passage / corridor

The lower level holds a suite of private spaces positioned and designed to respond to different needs. The children’s rooms are located in two separate zones designed to respond to their ages—playful mezzanine bedrooms in one zone, and secluded garden rooms at the other. 

"The program was developed closely with our client to create spaces that would help bring the family together, and that could be flexibly inhabited in different ways," says Murfutt. The considerable exposed thermal mass, and the subterranean nature of the lower-level rooms also enables passive thermal regulation of the spaces.

Northcote House by Mitsuori Architects / Bedroom

A simple, natural material palette of concrete, steel, glass, and plywood accentuates the striking architecture while adding warmth and a tactile quality to the interiors. "The configuration of spaces, relationship of rooms to one another, and the intangible qualities of spaces became our primary focus," concludes Murfutt.

Floor Plan of Northcote House by Mitsuori Architects

Related Reading:

12 Mullet Homes in Melbourne That Are Modern in the Back

Sea Green and Curved Glass Give a Melbourne Extension Aquatic Vibes

Project Credits:

Architect of Record: Mitsuori Architects / @mitsuoriarchitects

Builder: Homeowner

Structural Engineer: Structural Edge

Civil Engineer: Structural Edge

Landscape Design: Andrew Plant Landscape Architects

Interior Design: Mitsuori Architects

Photographer: Michael Kai Photography / @michaelkaiphoto


This Concrete Home Listed in L.A. Will Take Your Pool Parties to the Next Level

Permalink - Posted on 2022-08-15 19:47

Perched on a tiered lot in Pasadena, the $6.8M residence makes a splash with a resort-like backyard.

Location: 561 Woodland Road, Pasadena, California

Price: $6,800,000

Year Built: 2009

Footprint: 5,810 square feet (five bedrooms, six baths)

Lot Size: 20,567 square feet

From the agent: "Located in Pasadena’s prestigious Oak Knoll area, this thoughtfully designed contemporary home is the perfect venue for large-scale entertaining. Step into the light-infused living room with 22-foot vaulted ceilings that extend seamlessly into the private backyard. The space flows into the grand dining room with a dual-sided fireplace and spills into the gourmet kitchen with a 17-foot marble waterfall island and Sub-Zero/Viking appliances. Newly updated efficiency features include: drought-tolerant landscaping with drip system, a tankless water heater, whole house solar power, tinted windows/skylights, and LED lighting."

Upon arrival, a darling free-standing library extends a warm, communal welcome, while native vegetation spans across the front lawn to help the modern home blend in with its lush surrounding neighborhood of Oak Knoll.

At the entry, a darling little freestanding library extends a warm, communal welcome, while native vegetation spans the front lawn, blending the home with its lush surrounding neighborhood of Oak Knoll.

Photo by Pierre Galant

Photo by Pierre Galant

An elongated, marble waterfall island anchors the open kitchen, which is located just steps away from the primary living spaces.

An elongated, marble waterfall island anchors the open kitchen, which is located just steps away from the primary living spaces.

Photo by Pierre Galant

Photo by Pierre Galant

Expansive glazing spans across the rear facade, offering direct access to the backyard.

Glazing spans the rear facade, offering direct access to the backyard.

Photo by Pierre Galant

Photo by Pierre Galant

Hardwood floors continue into the six bathrooms, all of which feature new fixtures.

Hardwood floors continue into the six bathrooms, all of which feature new fixtures.

Photo by Pierre Galant

Photo by Pierre Galant

Just beyond the fire pit is a turnkey guest house, complete with a kitchenette, bedroom, and bath.

Just beyond the fire pit is a turnkey guesthouse, complete with a kitchenette, bedroom, and bath. 

Photo by Pierre Galant

Another view of the backyard showcasing the home's pristine entertaining spaces.

Another view of the backyard showcases the home’s pristine entertaining spaces. 

Photo by Pierre Galant

561 Woodland Road in Pasadena, California, is currently listed for $6,800,000 by Michelle Luczyski and Derek Luczyski of DPP Real Estate.


Blu Dot’s First Bedding Collection Doubles Down on Texture

Permalink - Posted on 2022-08-15 13:32

Crisp, soft, waffled, and stitched—the brand’s new sheets, duvets, coverlets, and quilts give us all the feels.

Blu Dot is celebrating its 25th anniversary with a blast as it rolls out its very first complete line of bedding. To create the collection, the Minneapolis-based brand teamed up with a family-owned factory in Portugal that specializes in cotton and linen—and the resulting soft goods are imbued with saturated hues and texture galore.

Photo: Blu Dot

Fans of the brand will find a familiar cast of punchy colors—including mustard, tomato, loden, and gray blue—as well as soothing neutrals and a smattering of patterned weaves. The palette is carefully considered—you’d be hard pressed to pair two hues that clash, which helps take the guesswork out of dressing the bed.

Photo: Blu Dot

In terms of handfeel, the Egyptian cotton percale sheets are crisp and cool, while the stonewashed linen sets have a variegated texture and a cozy softness straight off the shelf. The toppings steal the show, however, with richly textured weaves that widely in weight and depth.

Standout pieces include the wavy Ripple coverlet, the waffle-woven Cascade duvet, the squared-stitched Ester quilt, the puffy Popple duvet, and the hefty Rainy linen throw.

Photo: Blu Dot

At $125 to $325, the pieces are competitively priced compared to Parachute, Brooklinen, and other high-end bedding companies—and all of the sets come with pillowcases or shams, so you may even get more bang for your buck.

With a strong palette and a range of textures, the collection layers on variety and versatility. If you’re feeling monochromatic, you could dress your bed in textural twists on a single color, and it’d never feel boring. And yes, you could also match your bedding to your Blu Dot chair or dresser, if you so desire.

Photo: Blu Dot

You can peruse the full line of bedding on bludot.com, or by scrolling on to see our favorites.

Blu Dot Percale Sheet Set

Our lightweight percale is a solid choice for hot nights and hot sleepers. Crafted in Portugal from 100% premium, certified long-staple Egyptian cotton. Crisp finish keeps you feeling classy and cool. Win-win.​

Blu Dot Cascade Duvet Set

You’re not dreaming (yet). Timeless and luxurious, our 100% cotton Cascade set adds an extra layer of dimension and warmth to your sleep situation.

Blu Dot Ester Linen Quilt Set

Not too hot, not too cold, it’s juuuust right. Ester flaunts a quilted linen topside and a soft cotton underside for solid sleep on either side. Comes in dreamy bold shades for those looking to try something new in the bedroom.

Blu Dot Canfield Stripe Quilt Set

Make your bed dreamy as can be. Our soft and weighty quilt invites all manner of canoodling. Fun stripes keep your bed looking effortlessly snoozy and snazzy.

Blu Dot Stone Washed Linen Sheet Set

As if you needed another reason to stay in bed. Prettier than pretty, softer than soft, these light and airy sheets are made in Portugal using the finest European flax. Keeps you comfortably cool in the summer and perfectly toasty in the winter.

Blu Dot Popple Duvet Set

We got your beauty sleep right here. Our 100% cotton Popple set is double-layered for twice the comfort and warmth. Subtle stitch detail magically looks both formal and casual. Great for cool nights, cold feet and impressing overnight guests.

Blu Dot Ripple Coverlet Set

Good for quick naps and crisp nights—our lightweight, oversized Ripple Coverlet is made from 100% machine washable cotton. Lovely as an extra layer or to add end-of-bed finesse.

Blu Dot Kimball Stripe Duvet Set

Get into the good sleep game. Our light and airy Kimball Stripe Duvet combines classic good looks with uber soft feels for quality sleep guaranteed.


A Grand Manor in the Mountains of Western North Carolina Asks $7.9M

Permalink - Posted on 2022-08-12 18:23

An infinity pool with spa, home theater, and stunning views make this home a modern sanctuary.

5 Wild Wind Trail in Fairview, North Carolina, is currently listed for $7,950,000 by Premier Sotheby's International Realty.

Discretely sited with coveted views, this private mountain sanctuary was curated with a nod to different locales around the globe. A bold, light-filled living space with sleek steel and wood blends seamlessly with the outdoor living areas to create a connection to the wooded panoramas. 

The main-level primary wing serves as an expansive retreat. Descend the stairs or use the elevator to the lower level where there's a Parisian-inspired bar with booth seating and a theater/lounge room that opens to an outdoor living area. Outside, find an infinity pool with spa and firepit.

Listing Details 

Bedrooms: 7

Baths: 7 full, 2 partial 

Year Built: 2009

Square Feet: 12,040

Plot Size: 26.73 acres

Courtesy of Premier Sotheby's International Realty


Courtesy of Premier Sotheby's International Realty


Courtesy of Premier Sotheby's International Realty


Courtesy of Premier Sotheby's International Realty


Courtesy of Premier Sotheby's International Realty


Courtesy of Premier Sotheby's International Realty


Courtesy of Premier Sotheby's International Realty


Courtesy of Premier Sotheby's International Realty


Courtesy of Premier Sotheby's International Realty


A Dark and Dreary Welsh Row House Gets a Dazzling Reinvention

Permalink - Posted on 2022-08-12 17:35

A renovation by Benjamin Hale Architects presents “a template for bringing Cardiff houses into the 21st century.”

This renovation by Benjamin Hale Architects presents “a template for bringing Cardiff houses into the 21st century.”

Just as their American and Australian counterparts flock to New York or Melbourne to start careers, freshly minted architects in the United Kingdom often head to London to earn their bona fides. Yet many of these young professionals eventually realize that the day-to-day business of a global city isn’t quite as glamorous as advertised. 

For the Welsh-German architect Benjamin Hale, the realization that London architects, "rather than looking farther afield [for inspiration], were looking over each other’s shoulders," compelled him to open his own practice in both the British capital as well as his hometown of Cardiff, Wales, where he felt he could exercise his creative license more unselfconsciously. 

Caption TK Here

Before architect Benjamin Hale renovated this 1899 row house in Cardiff, Wales, for Myfanwy and Tom Shorey, a rear corner of the dining room led to a garden conservatory. By expanding and reprogramming the conservatory, Hale has connected the dining room to the kitchen.

Pierce Scourfield

At the start of the pandemic, as Hale began setting up his eponymous studio in Cardiff, homeowners Myfanwy and Tom Shorey were just finishing six years of saving for a ground-floor renovation in the city’s Roath neighborhood. Constructed in 1899 and largely original in condition, the Shoreys’ Victorian row house steps down from three floors facing the street to a single-story utility room in the back and has an L-shaped footprint. 

Occupants step down into the kitchen from the dining room. A run of cabinets with an integrated sink directly abuts the threshold between the rooms, where an original plaster archway also meets new ceiling joists.

Steps lead down from the reception room into the kitchen. A run of cabinets with an integrated sink directly abuts the threshold between the rooms, and this new wash/prep space terminates in a door to the rear garden. 

Pierce Scourfield

Because a previous owner had modernized the rearward kitchen without altering the building’s overall layout, "everything was in the wrong place," Myfanwy, who manages a local art gallery, recalls of the deep, warren-like plan. "I had a vision of balancing what I needed and being sympathetic to the house."

Tom adds that that vision is not commonplace for Cardiff. "People are buying three walls and opening up the rear, and they tend to stick on glass boxes," says the travel entrepreneur. (He and Myfanwy also recently cofounded Hunant, which produces fitted bedsheets patterned on traditional Welsh tapestry blankets.) 

Italian terrazzo distinguishes the conservatory-cum-kitchen from the house's original footprint, which Hale floored in white oak.

Italian terrazzo distinguishes the conservatory-cum-kitchen from the house’s original footprint, which Hale floored in white oak. The architect worked with a local welder to produce the Cumbrian slate–topped cooking island seen in the foreground.

Pierce Scourfield

When the couple discovered Hale via Instagram, they felt instantly connected to his attitude toward historic homes. "Rather than knock something down and start again, I think you get a lot more interesting architectural language when you heal a building," says the architect. 

The Shoreys then learned that Hale had recently settled around the corner, so Tom picked up the phone in October 2020. "I thought that, before we do anything, we should check that chemistry and make sure we weren’t going to be treated like a number," he explains. Hale shared that he had also come back to Cardiff to enjoy hands-on participation in projects, and the husband and wife were sold. The trio drew and redrew the renovation in earnest through the holiday season.

Overhead, an original plaster archway meets new ceiling joists at the intersection of the dining room and kitchen. The joists modulate the daylight that enters the kitchen from an expansive new skylight.

Overhead, an original plaster archway meets new ceiling joists at the intersection of the dining room and kitchen. The joists modulate the daylight that enters the kitchen from an expansive new skylight. 

Pierce Scourfield

Over the six years that the Shoreys had owned the row house, Myfanwy had been keeping notes about potential reconfigurations of the 1,200-square-foot ground floor. Hale confirmed and built upon the field research, noting, "Even with a limited budget, we could make surgical moves that opened up the house." 

The architect left the historic front parlor and adjacent dining room relatively untouched, yet in the middle of the building he combined the kitchen and the rear parlor into a generous space that has multiple zones for food prep, gathering, and individual retreat. By converting a garden conservatory room into a slightly longer volume that could accommodate circulation as well as sink-integrated cabinetry, Hale created a pair of routes from front to back: one straight line between the street-facing entrance to the kitchen, as well as a path that wends to the kitchen through the dining room and former conservatory. 

Originally a scullery, this garden room connects to the back of the kitchen. The grooved timber wall conceals a powder room door.

Originally a scullery, this garden room connects to the back of the kitchen. The grooved timber wall conceals a powder room door.

Pierce Scourfield

Besides conceiving an all-new kitchen for the rear of the row house, Hale eschewed daylighting via glass box and installed a monitor atop exposed joists over the wash/prep area. "Back in London, I learned that diffuse overhead light is best for activities ranging from viewing art in galleries to cutting a tomato," the architect explains. Following on the heels of a recent historic heatwave, he adds, "The exposed joists also act as a solar refractor, so you’re not getting overheating." 

A series of folding doors separates the garden room from its namesake outdoor space.

A series of folding doors separates the garden room from its namesake outdoor space. 

Pierce Scourfield

In the very back of the house, Hale transformed the scullery into a garden room whose paneled walls and clay pavers meld durability and elegance. When a series of folding doors is opened, the room gives the impression of a garden nook; closed, it resembles another of the kitchen’s quiet zones. 

When the room's folding doors are fully open, house and garden flow into one another.

When the room’s folding doors are fully open, house and garden flow into one another.

Pierce Scourfield

Tom says he had doubts that the renovated interior would yield as many experiences as promised. But since its completion this past January, he has gladly eaten those words. "We didn’t want to entertain for six years, and now we want people to see the work," he explains. "And coming [from the garden] to the kitchen for champagne, going into the dining room through the kitchen, and then coming back to the garden for a whiskey, it’s all worked fantastically well." When not hosting friends, Tom finds himself gravitating toward the garden room "to read a book in peace and look at the bird boxes." 

The garden room is finished in clay pavers whose gray hues evoke the kitchen cooking island's Cumbrian slate surface.

The garden room is finished in clay pavers whose gray hues evoke the kitchen cooking island’s Cumbrian slate surface. 

Pierce Scourfield

Myfanwy echoes the sentiment, saying she’s thrilled that the rear of the ground floor rotates between communal kitchen, relaxation space, and garden perch. She also foresees a ripple effect. "We’ve done this on a very good budget, so once more people know about this project, I think they will realize the potential. It’s almost like a template for bringing Cardiff houses into the 21st century." 

Just outside the kitchen's rear entry, Benjamin Hale Architects created a pergola that aligns to the ceiling joists that top the wash/prep area inside.

Just outside the kitchen's rear entry, Benjamin Hale Architects created a pergola that aligns to the ceiling joists that top the wash/prep area inside. 

Pierce Scourfield

A view of the Shoreys' rear garden—Cardiff in summertime.

A view of the Shoreys’ rear garden captures Cardiff in summertime. Architect Benjamin Hale also designed the landscape.

Pierce Scourfield

Hale says that he hadn’t set out to quash the glass-box movement. "I’ve never designed to a style or pushed a solution—if you listen to the client and the building, the best solutions generally reveal themselves," he demurs. "Myfanwy, Tom, and the building spoke, and I think we’ve created something rather special as a consequence." Yet if the Shoreys’ renovation does mark the start of a new phenomenon, then the U.K.’s next young architects may choose Cardiff to make a name for themselves.

Floor Plan of Pen Y Lan by Benjamin Hale Architects

Related Reading:

This Radiant Extension Takes Cues From Car Design

14 Extraordinary Additions That Transform Centuries-Old London Homes

Project Credits:

Architect: Benjamin Hale, Benjamin Hale Architects / @benjaminhale.co.uk

Contracting and Carpentry: James White Construction

Structural Engineer: Western Building Consultants

Timber Windows/Doors: Ray Williams


This £545K Suffolk Farmhouse Will Make Your Cottagecore Dreams Come True

Permalink - Posted on 2022-08-12 17:00

Bring your bonnet—set in the quaint English village of Yoxford, the 1592 residence offers a trove of original details.

Original flooring—featuring a combination of stone slabs, bricks, terracotta tiles and oak planks—lines the lower level.

Location: Yoxford, Suffolk, England

Price: £545,000

Year Built: 1592

Footprint: 1,131 square feet (two bedrooms, one bath)

From the agent: "This incredible, Grade II–listed, timber-framed Suffolk farmhouse is believed to mainly date from around 1592. The house, which is found in one half of the original farmhouse, has been lovingly restored by the current owners during their years of guardianship. To the rear is its own private garden and two handsome outbuildings, which have planning permission to convert into separate holiday accommodations. Well located in the pretty village of Yoxford, the house is a stone’s throw from the coast and the celebrated towns of Aldeburgh and Southwold."

A newly constructed wooden fence lines the yard to provide ample privacy.

A newly constructed wooden fence lines the yard to provide plenty of privacy.

Photo courtesy of Inigo

Upon entry, an open-plan living area extends a warm welcome. "This room is incredibly unique, with brilliantly uneven, textured surfaces—from the beams in the ceiling to the wood-clad walls,

Upon entry, an open-plan living area extends a warm welcome. "This room is incredibly unique, with brilliantly uneven, textured surfaces—from the beams in the ceiling to the wood-clad walls," notes the agent.

Photo courtesy of Inigo

Photo courtesy of Inigo

The corner kitchen comes with marble countertops and a large ceramic sink.

The corner kitchen comes with marble countertops and a large ceramic sink. 

Photo courtesy of Inigo

Photo courtesy of Inigo

Original flooring—featuring a combination of stone slabs, bricks, terracotta tiles and oak planks—lines the lower level.

Original flooring—featuring a combination of stone slabs, bricks, terra-cotta tiles, and oak planks—lines the lower level.

Photo courtesy of Inigo

Photo courtesy of Inigo

A freestanding, cast-iron soaking tub awaits upstairs near the main bedroom.

A freestanding, cast-iron soaking tub awaits upstairs near the main bedroom.

Photo courtesy of Inigo

Photo courtesy of Inigo

Outside, a brick terrace runs the length of the house, creating an idyllic spot for al fresco dining.

Outside, a brick terrace runs the length of the house, creating an idyllic spot for alfresco dining.

Photo courtesy of Inigo


This Metallic Office Space in Munich Is an Underground Party Waiting to Happen

Permalink - Posted on 2022-08-12 16:25

The renovated basement has curtains made of shiny bubble wrap, steel grate catwalks, and reflective surfaces everywhere.

Houses We Love: Every day we feature a remarkable space submitted by our community of architects, designers, builders, and homeowners.

Project Details:

Location: Munich, Germany

Architect: Buero Wagner

Footprint: 1,507 square feet

From the Architect: "The continuing demand for new space in Munich is increasing the pressure on existing buildings in particular. The potential for densification, by means of roof extensions and additional stories, is either already almost exhausted or limited by the authorities. In the search for further densification, basement floors are increasingly coming into focus. In London, this trend has been evident for decades.

"In this office conversion in Munich, the basement was opened up and connected to the first floor via an air space. The new unit can be accessed via fixtures made of galvanized steel gratings. Windows were extended into the basement to provide adequate lighting. Silver curtains made of aluminum vapor barriers on the back conceal the kitchen, storage shelves, as well as the passages to the toilet and to the storage rooms. At the same time, the reflective surfaces help to relax the existing lighting situation. Curtains made out of bubble wrap provide privacy while allowing sufficient light to come into the interior. The building stock was preserved as far as possible and only the surfaces were refurbished."

Courtesy of Buero Wagner

Courtesy of Buero Wagner

Courtesy of Buero Wagner

Courtesy of Buero Wagner

Courtesy of Buero Wagner

Courtesy of Buero Wagner

Courtesy of Buero Wagner

Courtesy of Bueno Wagner

Courtesy of Buero Wagner

Courtesy of Buero Wagner

Courtesy of Bueno Wagner

Courtesy of Bueno Wagner

Courtesy of Buero Wagner

Courtesy of Bueno Wagner


#VanLife Too Big of a Commitment? Rent the Lifestyle Instead

Permalink - Posted on 2022-08-12 16:06

For those who are ready to hit the road without giving up their home, new start-up Cabana has camper vans for hire.

Cabana offers Ford Transit and Mercedes camper vans for rent as mobile hotel rooms that let travelers explore with comfort, peace, and privacy.

Rising gas prices added new challenges to #vanlife—but that’s not stopping one company from helping people explore roads less traveled.  Cabana, a Seattle-based start-up that calls itself a "mobile hospitality company," is renting high-end camper vans to anyone interested in a vacation beyond the walls of a hotel room or Airbnb.

And the company’s founder, Scott Kubly, would know a thing or two about hotel rooms. "I spent more than 200 nights in hotels in 2018 alone," he says.

Cabana offers Ford Transit and Mercedes camper vans for rent as mobile hotel rooms that let travelers explore with comfort, peace, and privacy.

Cabana rents Ford Transit and Mercedes camper vans, allowing travelers to explore with comfort, peace, and privacy.

Photo by Mio Monasch, courtesy of Cabana

Kubly was the director of the Seattle Department of Transportation before joining LimeBike as its chief program officer, where he flew around the world to meet with local government. It was on a work trip to Australia and New Zealand when the idea for a camper van rental company dawned on him.

"I joined friends for dinner at their home, and after a great meal, a few glasses of wine, and a lot of jet lag, I said I wished my hotel was right outside their house," says Kubly. "We spent the rest of that evening tossing ideas back and forth about what it would look like to build a mobile hotel room, and Cabana was born."

Cabana's larger Mercedes camper van accommodates as many as four people.

Cabana’s larger Mercedes Sprinter camper van, the Cabana Quad, accommodates as many as four people.

Photo by Mio Monasch, courtesy of Cabana

The idea isn’t brand new. Escape has been renting camper vans since 2009, and Los Angeles company Texino started as a van share program, though its focus shifted during the pandemic. But whereas these companies hand you the keys and send you on your way, Cabana takes a white-glove approach to hitting the road.

"A guest might want a full seven-day road trip charted out for them, complete with excursion ideas, must-stop scenic lookout points, and campsites booked for each night," Kubly says. "Or they might just need suggested places to stop near Big Sur." Whether you’re looking for a long list of recommendations, or the freedom to chart your own route, the company’s services are completely free, says Kubly.

Cabana's Mercedes camper van features an indoor compact kitchen.

The Quad also features an indoor kitchen.

Photo by Mio Monasch, courtesy of Cabana

A bed in the pop-up section of one of the camper vans is the ideal place for kids to sleep or relax.

A pop-up with a bed is an ideal place for kids, or to just relax.

Photo by Mio Monasch, courtesy of Cabana

So what are you paying for?

Every van includes a bedroom, bathroom, and shower, as well as gear storage and television with streaming capabilities. But customers can choose between two different models depending on more specific needs. The Cabana Classic, a Ford Transit that accommodates two travelers, features an outdoor kitchen, while the Cabana Quad, a 170-inch Mercedes Sprinter that will be available starting 2023, has room for four passengers and comes with an indoor kitchen and extra storage. "The Quad is the largest and most versatile van in the fleet," Kubly says.

Cabana camper vans offer an alternative to traditional hotels, allowing travelers to avoid crowds and explore unique places.

Cabana camper vans offer an alternative to hotels or vacation rentals.

Photo by Mio Monasch, courtesy of Cabana

To date, Cabana’s turnkey operation has largely attracted first-timers in Seattle and Los Angeles, where the rentals are currently available. Kubly says that 70 percent of its customers have never used a camper van or RV before, and that they’ve been attracting an audience that’s young, and young at heart. "Our guests tend to be 55 and older, or range in age from 25 to 35," he says.

Cabana camper vans also facilitate more time spent outdoors, exploring nature.

The company puts an emphasis on time spent outdoors rather than inside of four walls.

Photo by Mio Monasch, courtesy of Cabana

Camper vans by Cabana are outfitted with at least one queen-size bed, a bathroom, a shower, and a kitchen.

The vans are outfitted with at least one queen-size bed, a bathroom, a shower, and a kitchen.

Photo by Mio Monasch, courtesy of Cabana

When asked why it’s a good time to be getting a business like Cabana off the ground, Kubly points to the conditions of the pandemic. "It changed the way we live and has massively impacted the way we travel," he says. "It reignited passion for the road trip. With Cabana, you can get out there and explore in a safe way."

Learn more about Cabana and how to book at the company’s website.

Related Reading:

This New Camper Van Service Is Like Airbnb for #VanLifers

This Book Covers Everything You Need to Know About Retrofitting a Camper Van

Project Credits:

Design & Construction: Cabana/@cabanavans


Take in Views of Lake Quivira From an Infinity Pool for $2.5M

Permalink - Posted on 2022-08-12 01:22

High ceilings, views from every room, and plush contemporary interiors make this the ultimate vacation home.

370 Lakeshore West Drive in Lake Quivira, Kansas, is currently listed for $2,575,000 by Bash & Co. Sotheby's International Realty.

Modern design meets a serene lake setting in this 4,200-square-foot property. The living room features 29-foot ceilings under a butterfly roof while glass doors open to a wood deck with unobstructed lake panoramas and a sparkling infinity pool. All four bedrooms feature stunning views even though the interiors themselves are spectacular enough, especially the primary bath with its chandelier-topped soaking tub. To top it all off, there is a four-car tandem garage and a golf cart garage. 

The Lake Quivira Country Club also includes a new 43,000-square-foot community center, tennis, golf, beaches, boating, equestrian trails and stable, walking trails, and restaurants. 

Listing Details   

Bedrooms: 4 

Baths: 3 full, 2 partial  

Year Built: 2005 

Square Feet: 4,200

Plot Size: 0.28 acres

Courtesy of Bash &amp; Co. Sotheby's International Realty


Courtesy of Bash &amp; Co. Sotheby's International Realty


Courtesy of Bash &amp; Co. Sotheby's International Realty


Courtesy of Bash &amp; Co. Sotheby's International Realty


Courtesy of Bash &amp; Co. Sotheby's International Realty


Courtesy of Bash &amp; Co. Sotheby's International Realty


Courtesy of Bash &amp; Co. Sotheby's International Realty


Courtesy of Bash &amp; Co. Sotheby's International Realty


Courtesy of Bash &amp; Co. Sotheby's International Realty


Courtesy of Bash &amp; Co. Sotheby's International Realty


Courtesy of Bash &amp; Co. Sotheby's International Realty


Courtesy of Bash &amp; Co. Sotheby's International Realty


Courtesy of Bash &amp; Co. Sotheby's International Realty


The Long, Hazy History of the New York City Subway Bench

Permalink - Posted on 2022-08-11 18:46

The unembellished wooden seat is a landmark of the city’s underground rail system, but the largely unexposed evolution of its design deserves greater recognition.

You may not consider it such, but in my opinion, New York City’s wooden subway bench is a modernist icon. Gritty in presentation but inoffensive to the eye and advantageously cheap to manufacture, the thick aggregation of solid oak blocks doesn’t ask for much attention. The ubiquitous piece of public furniture sits at the centerline of MTA subway platforms, offering refuge to tired legs awaiting too-often-delayed trains. Connected by threaded rods, the varying sizes of rectilinear wood join together in a manner similar to other iconic furniture of the 1940s; Pierre Jeanneret’s office chair, Hans Wegner’s Chair 28, and even Gio Ponti’s Chairs for Casion San Remo all speak the same language.  

Despite their overt presence in public spaces, not much is recorded about who designed New York City’s subway platform benches. It’s believed that the original mission-style oak bench, present at the subway’s early 20th-century inception, was the work of the Stickley Brothers. Most of the city’s subway furniture was manufactured by the Stickleys under the guidance of "underground Renaissance man" Squire J. Vickers, a chief architect of the NYC subway who designed approximately three quarters of the system. (Also a euphuistic painter, Vickers’s expressive character can be found in the varied colors and geometries of the subway stations’ wall mosaics.) 

"From what I understand, there is no public knowledge of the history of today’s wooden bench design," says Daniel Brenner, acting collections manager and research archivist at the New York Transit Museum. "Most likely Squire Vickers did the design work, as the elements of the station—like the change booth—would all have been integral to his designs. This style of bench shows up in the reopening photos of the Interstate Rapid Transit [in the early 1900s]." 

The most recent, widely recognizable model of the wooden subway bench, introduced in the 1970s, has remained unaltered for decades.

Older bench styles were replaced every couple of years or so, and as such, few of them lasted before a new design would come through. "The old-style subway benches started to be augmented and replaced around 1970 or so, initially by recycling green fiberglass bus seats from 1956 Mack buses for many locations," says Bill Wall, a retired train service supervisor for New York City Transit. "Some stations had new tile work put in at that time, so the newer-style benches started to show up, replacing the long, heavy benches and much smaller elevated station slat styles that had survived." The most recent, widely recognizable model of the wooden subway bench, introduced in the 1970s, has remained unaltered for decades. According to Metropolis, the design is a variation of a model commissioned in 1973 by the New York Port Authority to provide benches for the Hudson River region. The first ones were manufactured by the Hudson Design Service and seated four people. Later, the design was expanded to accommodate six. This succinctly assembled seating mechanism survived "the fall of modernism"—the boldly colored and gaudy cultural revamp following World War II into the postmodern age. 

Over the years, the city has experimented with changes to the ’70s subway bench style, adding spacers between passengers and removing the backrests; solutions put forth by the MTA to address the century-old alleged problem of bench sleeping. (The design of public infrastructure in a way that limits its use is referred to as "hostile architecture.") But since 2010, NYC Transit officials have been rather indecisive in committing to either complete removal or redesign of the longstanding subway benches. The MTA even went so far as to put the older benches up for sale as "underground furniture," priced at $650. When the benches hit the market, NYC Transit assistant chief operating officer Mike Zacchea told Gothamist: "They’re sort of iconic. They’ve been around a long time. They’re massive. I can see them sitting in a backyard being weathered for a couple more years and serving as a conversation piece."

Three people wait for the subway on a bench at 135th Street station in Manhattan, New York City.

Three people wait for the subway on a bench at 135th Street station in Manhattan, New York City.

Photo by Daniel Candal via Getty Images

Then, in early February of 2021, many of these benches, so common to the subway landscape, disappeared. The MTA sent out a tweet in response to inquiries into the benches’ whereabouts stating: "Benches were removed from stations to prevent the homeless from sleeping on them." After immediate uproar, the MTA deleted the tweet and said it was posted in "error." The lacquered wooden benches weren’t entirely beloved: Transit authorities fault them for being unhygienic (a problem that already existed, but became more acute after the emergence of COVID-19), but attempts at instituting alternatives, like new stainless-steel benches in some stations, were criticized by commuters for being too cold and uninviting, in addition to lacking aesthetic harmony with the dernier cri. 

In recent years, the MTA has also started introducing an updated version of the ’70s-style wooden subway bench that substitutes the rectangular block spacers for black-coated steel loops. This model, barely modified from the original, brings to mind George Nelson’s platform bench—another superstar of modern furniture. And though its history may slip away, largely undocumented, I believe that the long-lived, chunky wooden bench should be revered and celebrated as a modernist icon, grouped with furniture of George Nakashima and the like. The subway timepiece deserves to have its story told before the bench becomes just another item of memorabilia furniture at the New York Transit Museum, to be looked at and never used again.

Top photo by Conor Boyle, licensed under CC BY-NC-SA 2.0.

Correction: August 12, 2022
An earlier version of this article incorrectly described the introduction of the 1970s subway bench.

Related Reading:

The History of the Tripp Trapp Chair, Which Changed the Children’s Design Game

What Happens to Cities When We Are Free to Roam?


The Knowing Blandness of the ‘Dream Home Makeover’ Aesthetic

Permalink - Posted on 2022-08-11 17:33

Nothing says ‘of course we have money’ like Studio McGee’s pallid palette.

Welcome to Home Watching, a column about the wild and wooly world of renovation television from a self-proclaimed expert in the genre.

Much like pornography, you know a Studio McGee interior when you see it. Shea McGee, the brains behind the operation, who infamously started her company after gaining a following posting her first home’s remodel on Instagram, favors varying shades of white, accented with neutrals and natural materials. Color is off limits, unless it’s dark gray, black, or, on occasion, a deep, deep navy or evergreen. The ceilings are often white, adorned with reclaimed wood beams, and if the space allows, vaulted. The McGees favor ceramics, rough-hewn wood, and have never met a sheepskin rug they didn’t like. When viewed in aggregate, the aesthetic is unsatisfactory mostly in that it is unremarkable, especially in the kind of interiors the McGees often work with—massive new builds, where the entire house is a blank canvas, ready to be designed in Shea’s exacting aesthetic vision. 

Nowhere is this more evident than in the home of Liz and Neil, the couple featured in the third episode of Netflix’s Dream Home Makeover, which is now in its third season. The clients in question are repeat customers; the McGees worked on their Park City home, and have been tapped to lend their magic touch to their second home in Southern California, which appears to be just as big as the first. Liz and Neil have three children and are unfathomably wealthy, though what they do is never mentioned. It’s in this space that the McGees define their aesthetic vision—"upscale Napa farmhouse," Shea says, which sounds more like a marketing term than an actual design choice.

Does this ceiling really need to be vaulted?

Does this ceiling really need to be vaulted?

Courtesy of Netflix

What this translates to is large architectural gestures that convey wealth—vaulted ceilings in the kitchen and the living room, a "wine room" with built-in bookshelves that meet the ceiling, and other flourishes that speak to the vast amounts of money this couple must have to maintain their bonus home. It’s not that any of these design choices are anywhere close to hideous, per se—Studio McGee’s signature look is quieter than the Property Brothers, but more sophisticated that Chip and Joanna Gaines’s farmhouse chic. Staged as they are, though, the spaces designed by Studio McGee lack any discernible personality. Children get giant bedrooms with queen-size beds; every kitchen has an enormous island, whether or not the space actually needs it. (While most kitchens could use an island, not every space needs one. Understanding this difference is crucial.)

There’s nothing particularly of interest for me in Studio McGee’s most high-end designs. (Their Target line, which includes this very nice quilt, is much more my speed.) But despite this fact, I’ve watched every available episode of their show, usually in one sitting. What is interesting about the third season, which recently started streaming, is that the McGees have crossed a very specific home renovation reality TV rubicon, where they are now being sought out by people who have seen what they can do on TV and want it for themselves. It’s this difference that makes the show that much more interesting; watching human beings settle into their roles as commodities is always a trip. Shea and her husband Syd are striving to be personalities much like Ben and Erin Napier and Chip and Joanna Gaines are, but because Netflix lacks HGTV’s oomph, they have the space to experiment with their public-facing personalities, as the stakes are lower.  

Luckily, though, their dynamic as a couple and as business partners still has a little edge to it, which is likely a virtue of being on Netflix rather than HGTV. Syd McGee, the husband, often wears an expression in the confessionals that looks like he’s being held hostage, but is sort of okay with it. What he does for the company that bears his name is unclear, but one assumes it is sort of important and likely necessary. (In fact, he’s CEO.) When Shea’s hands are in every single pot, and the results of their renovations are perfectly in step with her conceptions, Syd dreams of a  life in Southern California, on the beach, with early morning surf sessions and bonfires at sunset. Instead, the show jokes, he is chained to his wife’s side, indispensable in a way that is never defined.

But like any good home design show, the real main character is not the couple doing the renovations, but the end results. For the two years that I’ve watched this program, I’ve tried to dial down what one might call this aesthetic, which is both specific and generic—like every other high-end Airbnb listing on the market, or an antiseptic boutique hotel that prides itself on design. But it wasn’t until halfway through this season when one of the McGee’s clients hit the nail on the head. "It’s upscale-looking," a woman says of her newly-renovated basement, which is divided into three clear "zones" meant to delineate what kinds of leisure activities should occur there and why. It’s not quite upscale, but suggestive of it instead, a different kind of new money aesthetic. But if given the choice between Studio McGee’s all-white fantasia and a giant McMansion fit for a Real Housewife of New Jersey, I’d take gold restroom fixtures and Travertine tile any day. At the very least, it’s fun.   

Top photo courtesy of Netflix.

More TV this way:

‘How to Build a Sex Room’ Has Some Heart

In ‘The Queen of Versailles Reigns Again,’ an Unfinished Mega-Mansion Is Not a Home

Home Renovation Shows Meet Cute with Romance Novels


Calling All Gardeners: An L.A. Bungalow With Bountiful Outdoor Space Is Ripe for the Picking

Permalink - Posted on 2022-08-11 17:27

Dating back to the 1890s, the $899K residence features raised planting beds, a sprawling backyard, and breathtaking city views.

The principal bathroom opens up directly to the backyard.

Location: 2919 Johnston Street, Los Angeles, California

Price: $899,000

Year Built: 1890

Footprint: 1,365 square feet (two bedrooms, two baths)

Lot Size: 15,071 square feet

From the agent: "In happening Lincoln Heights, this rustic-modern bungalow on a sprawling lot embodies the urban homesteader’s dream of exquisite design, tranquil surroundings, and breathtaking views. The 1890 residence has been stylishly reconfigured, bringing a pared-back and distinctly elegant flair to heritage elements that include wood flooring, vaulted ceilings, and exposed beams. Skylights bring all-day sunshine, and you’ll love the front sitting porch where the cityscape panorama will amaze. This home can be effectively separated into a pair of one-bed and one-bath units—an ideal arrangement for hosting guests."


The historic home now flaunts a crisp white facade, complete with green trim.

The historic home now features a crisp, white facade, complete with green trim. 

Photo by Jilbert Daniel, courtesy of Tracy Do

Photo by Cameron Carothers, courtesy of Tracy Do

Large skylights and windows invite ample natural light inside.

Large skylights and windows invite ample natural light inside.

Photo by Cameron Carothers, courtesy of Tracy Do

Photo by Cameron Carothers, courtesy of Tracy Do

Original details, including wood flooring and exposed beams, line the interiors.

Original details, including hardwood floors and exposed beams, line the interiors.

Photo by Cameron Carothers, courtesy of Tracy Do

Photo by Cameron Carothers, courtesy of Tracy Do

The principal bathroom opens up directly to the backyard.

The principal bathroom opens up directly to the backyard.

Photo by Cameron Carothers, courtesy of Tracy Do

Photo by Cameron Carothers, courtesy of Tracy Do

A peek at the freestanding sauna perched atop the gentle hillside lot.

A peek at the freestanding sauna perched atop the gentle hillside lot.

Photo by Jilbert Daniel, courtesy of Tracy Do

Photo by Jilbert Daniel, courtesy of Tracy Do


Two Experimental Townhouses Clad in Cor-Ten Steel Add Density to a Seattle Neighborhood

Permalink - Posted on 2022-08-11 16:26

Hybrid Architecture took an oversized family lot to its limits with a pair of vertical, gable-roofed residences.

Houses We Love: Every day we feature a remarkable space submitted by our community of architects, designers, builders, and homeowners.

Project Details:

Location: Seattle, USA

Architect: Hybrid / @hybridarc

Engineering: Sazei Design Group

Construction: Hybrid Assembly / @hybridarc

Development: Hybrid Development / @hybridarc

Cabinets: Abodian / @abodianinc

Photography: Rafael Soldi / @rafaelsoldi

From the Architect: "Nestled in Seattle’s Central District, Oak & Alder by Hybrid celebrates the city’s past while setting the tone for its future. Complete with a rusted Cor-Ten steel exterior, massive windows, and a pitched roofline, the townhome is inspired by a nearby red brick high school and neighboring craftsman homes. Oak & Alder reinterprets these features into a stylish high-density housing solution that accommodates two very different homeowners.

"In 2018, Hybrid’s founding partner and design principal, Robert Humble, befriended a local brewery owner who had an underutilized side yard on an oversized single-family lot. The owner was planning to sell his home, and Hybrid helped divide the lot and create a new development parcel on the owner’s side yard. Hybrid then purchased the parcel from the homeowner to develop Oak & Alder, transforming the empty lot into two perpendicular units and three parking spots without demolishing or displacing existing residents.

"One unit is occupied by a Copenhagen-based couple who were relocating to Seattle with their two children to launch a video game company. The family fell for Oak & Alder’s dramatic roofline, neutral Scandinavian-inspired color palette, and reverse floor plan. They purchased the home on presale sight unseen, granting them the rare opportunity to personalize their unit. The family selected custom Abodian cabinets in colorful Bauhaus hues and converted the ground level into two small kids’ rooms.

"The front unit was later purchased by an individual looking for a unique home close to his Capitol Hill office. He fell in love with Oak & Alder’s attention to flow and function but was most excited about the abundant natural light from the massive windows. The unit also features a sunlight-filled gasket off the third-story kitchen, offering outdoor access from multiple levels. The most light, however, comes from the top floor’s vaulted solarium, which he uses as a music studio."

Photo by Rafael Soldi

Photo by Rafael Soldi

Photo by Rafael Soldi

Photo by Rafael Soldi

Photo by Rafael Soldi

Photo by Rafael Soldi

Photo by Rafael Soldi

Photo by Rafael Soldi

Photo by Rafael Soldi

Photo by Rafael Soldi

Photo by Rafael Soldi

Photo by Rafael Soldi

Photo by Rafael Soldi

Photo by Rafael Soldi

Section of Oak &amp; Alder Townhome by Hybrid

Section of Oak & Alder Townhome by Hybrid

Hybrid

Lower level plan of Oak & Alder  Townhome by Hybrid

Lower level plan of Oak & Alder Townhome by Hybrid

Hybrid

Entry level plan of Oak & Alder  Townhome by Hybrid

Entry level plan of Oak & Alder Townhome by Hybrid

Hybrid

Living level plan of Oak & Alder  Townhome by Hybrid

Living level plan of Oak & Alder Townhome by Hybrid

Hybrid

Mezzanine level plan of Oak & Alder  Townhome by Hybrid

Mezzanine level plan of Oak & Alder Townhome by Hybrid

Hybrid


This Glass-Encased Hunts Point Property Is Prime for Lakeside Entertaining, Asks $21.5M

Permalink - Posted on 2022-08-11 15:20

The home, built in 1967, features a private dock and three levels of outdoor entertaining.

4232 Hunts Point Road in Hunts Point, WA, is currently listed for $21,500,000 by Realogics Sotheby's International Realty.

An east-facing estate nestled on the shores of Lake Washington awaits the vision of its next owner to take the residence to the next level or create a new legacy. This rarely available street-to-water property offers 100 feet of waterfront and endless possibilities. Guests and residents alike can enjoy three levels of outdoor entertaining. It all begins at the water’s edge and flows up to a lower lawn with a firepit for an evening under the stars. 

The upper lawn beckons for a friendly game of croquet, while an expansive deck spanning the entire width of the home is ready for a morning cup of coffee, quiet weeknight barbecues at home, and beyond. The aquatic adventures begin lakeside, whether it’s a relaxing afternoon amid the rocks or hopping aboard a vessel from your private dock. 

Listing Details    

Bedrooms: 4 

Baths: 4 full, 2 partial  

Year Built: 1967

Square Feet: 5,850

Plot Size: 0.86 acres

Courtesy of Realogics Sotheby's International Realty


Courtesy of Realogics Sotheby's International Realty


Courtesy of Realogics Sotheby's International Realty


Courtesy of Realogics Sotheby's International Realty


Courtesy of Realogics Sotheby's International Realty


Courtesy of Realogics Sotheby's International Realty


Courtesy of Realogics Sotheby's International Realty


Courtesy of Realogics Sotheby's International Realty


Keep It Au Naturel With Neutral Outdoor Furniture

Permalink - Posted on 2022-08-11 15:05

It’s all about the subdued hues.

An easy way to let your natural surroundings shine in your outdoor area is by embracing a pared-down palette. Create a tranquil escape with soft grays, beiges, creams, and blacks. After all, there’s something to be said about truly going back to nature.

Outdoor Sofas

Hay Palissade Lounge Sofa

For the Danish design company HAY, brothers Ronan and Erwan Bouroullec created the Palissade Collection (2015). Designed in color and form to integrate effortlessly with its surroundings, this collection stands out for its combination of visual simplicity and core strength. Elegant without being fragile and strong without being bulky, the Palissade Outdoor Lounge Sofa provides a sleek, comfortable seat for your outdoor spaces. Made in China.

Chicory Modular Teak Outdoor Sofa

The Modular Dwell™ Outdoor Living Collection is thoughtfully designed to be modular and weatherproof for convenient, comfortable outdoor living. Grade A Teak Wood Stain-resistant, Fade-proof, Liquid Repellent Upholstery Pillows: 100% recycled synthetic down Cushions: Low Density, High Resilience Foam & Synthetic Down Comfort Topper Interior Water-resistant Nylon Casings Stainless Steel Hardware

Neighbor Modern Teak Outdoor Sofa

A solid teak wood frame and roped back lend a modern silhouette to cushioned armrests, quick-drying foam, and life-proof Sunbrella fabric. The Haven collection can be customized to fit any space thanks to its modular design. Intended for lounging, pair with our teak outdoor coffee table for the perfect outdoor living room.

Chicory Modular Teak Outdoor Sofa Sectional

The Modular Dwell™ Outdoor Living Collection is thoughtfully designed to be modular and weatherproof for convenient, comfortable outdoor living. Grade A Teak Wood Stain-resistant, Fade-proof, Liquid Repellent Upholstery Pillows: 100% recycled synthetic down Cushions: Low Density, High Resilience Foam & Synthetic Down Comfort Topper Interior Water-resistant Nylon Casings Stainless Steel Hardware

Oasiq Maro 3 Seater Sofa

The Oasiq Maro 3 Seater Sofa is a seat for three with great comfort and a modern form. Designed by Gijs Papavoine, the sofa is made from teak wood and handwoven rope. It features just enough of proportion of wood and fabric giving it a sense of style and comfort for any lounging experience.

West Elm Porto Outdoor Sofa (76")

Relaxation ready with an inviting, deep seat.

Outdoor Lounge Chairs

Gubi Pacha Outdoor Lounge Chair

The Pacha Outdoor Lounge Chair (1975) features an embracing, organic form set on a slim, swiveling base that raises it just a few inches off the ground. Upholstered with two layers of outdoor suitable fabric, Pacha's inner layer is water repellent. Pacha's designer, Pierre Paulin developed designs that supported low-level living – a new approach to sitting introduced in the 1960s that bid adieu to chair legs and embraced low-slung profiles for easy, laid-back lounging. Made in Poland.

Magis Voido Rocker

Like an art installation that’s designed to interact with–and stretch out on–Voido (2006) is an innovative piece by Ron Arad for Magis. It looks like a piece of heavy sculpture but is made using industrial technology capable of producing large, sturdy, yet lightweight shapes out of polyethylene. Waterproof and ready for outdoor (or indoor) relaxation, Voido holds the body in a natural, ergonomic, well-supported position. The curved bottom ensures a smooth rocking motion if desired. Made in Italy.

Carl Hansen & Søn Deck Folding Lounge Chair

Reissued by Carl Hansen & Søn, the Deck Chair Series (1971) by Danish furniture designer Børge Mogensen is marked by purposeful design that helps bring people and nature together in thoughtful and inspiring ways. It’s constructed of solid untreated FSC-certified teak with carefully considered details that include gently rounded ends and identically spaced rivets. Originally conceived for Mogensen’s private balcony, each piece folds flat and can be neatly leaned against a wall or hung on a wall mount (sold separately) when not in use – making it ideal for spontaneous outdoor gatherings. Made in Vietnam.

Design Within Reach Sommer Lounge Chair

For the Sommer Outdoor Collection (2019), Copenhagen-based designer Chris Halstrøm wanted to give people the experience of indoor furniture in outdoor spaces. She transformed a traditional woven cord material often found on Danish indoor furniture into a durable, weatherproof weave that provides flexible comfort and lends an inviting texture. This lounge chair features a removable quick-dry cushion and pillow covered in durable Sunbrella fabric. Made in Indonesia.

Blu Dot Mate Outdoor Sun Lounger

Woven all-weather rope wraps a tubular aluminum frame to create a balance of texture, comfort and beauty. Sunbrella™ upholstered seat cushion is UV- and mildew-resistant. Proportioned for relaxation. Team up two for the outdoor daybed of your dreams.

Outdoor Dining Chairs

Blu Dot Decade Chair

The Decade Dining Chair is a dining chair made of 100% recycled plastic. Highly robust, Decade's smooth surface features gentle curves and slopes. Because of its simplicity, the Decade Dining Chair will pair easily with any dining room set. Available in a wide range of colors to create the look desired for any modern dining room space. It is stackable, storing can be effortless, and stacked up to twelve chairs high. This dining chair is suitable for indoor and outdoor environments.

Ikea Terje Folding Chair

Just the thing for the breakfast nook or when you need extra chairs for guests or parties. The hole in the back allows you to hang them on the wall to free up space when they’re not being used.

Bend Goods Farmhouse Lounge Chair

A modern lounge chair inspired by antique Pennsylvania Dutch barns. The Bend Goods Farmhouse Lounge Chair has an intricate pattern made out of iron wire. Galvanizing and powder coating protects and enhances the unique structure. Add on the Bend Seat Cushion, and you'll be set for hours of comfy relaxing, indoors or out.

Outdoor Dining Tables

Design Within Reach Sommer Dining Table

For the Sommer Outdoor Collection (2019), Copenhagen-based designer Chris Halstrøm wanted to give people the experience of indoor furniture in outdoor spaces. She brought the clean, airy lines of modern furniture into a durable outdoor dining table made from powder-coated aluminum. This table is available in two shapes: round seats up to four, oval up to 10. Made in Indonesia.

Terra Outdoor Madera Dining Table With Golden Teak Top

French country tradition with a California twist. Designed for gracious dining and built for life outdoors. Madera lets you mix or match materials to suit your style. Choose a stately trestle table in premium teak or teak-topped aluminum. Surround it with coordinating benches, or opt for chairs that pair teak with all-weather wicker and Sunbrella® cushions for an eclectic look.

Cane-Line Chill-Out Coffee Table, Dual Height

Both sleek and practical, the Chill Out Dual Height Coffee Table is one modern outdoor coffee table that looks and works great no matter where it's placed. Similarly to the Chill Out Side Table Set, the contemporary coffee table features a minimal design consisting of an overextending table top with a frame that reaches further to make up the base. What makes this coffee table special is its capability to offer varied level surface areas within one unit; while half the table's surface stays set in place, the other half can be lifted and extended to meet an ideal height for working off a laptop or dining lightly from the sofa. Stylish and well designed, the Chill Out Dual Height Coffee Table is a perfect addition to any space whether it's placed indoors or outdoors.

The Modular Teak Outdoor Sofa Sectional is presented in partnership with Chicory. 

We love the products we feature and hope you do, too. If you buy something through a link on the site, we may earn an affiliate commission.

Related Reading:

Outdoor Armchairs for Lounging in Style

Charming Outdoor Coffee Tables We Love


This Lush Buenos Aires Home Cleverly Blurs the Boundaries Between Inside and Out

Permalink - Posted on 2022-08-10 21:13

Junta Arquitectas worked magic with a limited footprint by incorporating a sunny courtyard, verdant patio, and green roof to top things off.

PH SUPERÍ

Houses We Love: Every day we feature a remarkable space submitted by our community of architects, designers, builders, and homeowners.

Project Details:

Location: Buenos Aires, Argentina

Architect: Junta Arquitectas

Footprint: 936 square feet

From the Architect: "Ph Superí is located in the City of Buenos Aires on the border of Coghlan and Saavedra neighborhoods. It’s a low-density area four blocks from Saavedra Park, between Crámer and Balbín avenues. The project deals with the intervention of a ph-type house, a typical Buenos Aires typology inherited from the ‘casa chorizo’ of the early 20th century, in which several housing units are located on the same lot.

"This project involved rethinking the functionality of the existing house and extending the terrace on the first floor. The original structure of load-bearing walls was replaced by an independent system of reinforced concrete columns and beams. The new open and flexible spatial configuration dematerialized the interior-exterior limit, showing the plasticity and texture of the material. The inverted beams allow the incorporation of a green roof that both insulates the house and retains rainwater."

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PH SUPERÍ

Photo: Fernando Schapochnik

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Photo: Fernando Schapochnik

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Photo: Fernando Schapochnik

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Photo: Fernando Schapochnik

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Photo: Fernando Schapochnik

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Photo: Fernando Schapochnik

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Photo: Fernando Schapochnik

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Photo: Fernando Schapochnik

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Photo: Fernando Schapochnik

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Photo: Fernando Schapochnik

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Photo: Fernando Schapochnik

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Photo: Fernando Schapochnik

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Photo: Fernando Schapochnik


Budget Breakdown: A Couple Roll Up Their Sleeves to Revamp a Colorado A-Frame for $164K

Permalink - Posted on 2022-08-10 17:04

Amy Pigliacampo and Corey Szopinski brave snow, fire, and falling trees as they transform a ’70s cabin into a Scandinavian-style retreat.

"One visit over the winter, and we drove up to find four feet of snow covering the driveway and stairs down to the cabin,

When interior designer Amy Pigliacampo first picked up the keys to this cabin in a remote enclave of Alma, Colorado, she knew that referring to its neck of the woods as a "neighborhood" would be a stretch. "To be honest, we saw more moose than humans," she jokes. 

"One visit over the winter, and we drove up to find four feet of snow covering the driveway and stairs down to the cabin,

"One visit over the winter, and we drove up to find four feet of snow covering the driveway and stairs down to the cabin," interior designer Amy Pigliacampo says. "There was no way to even park the truck!" The most expensive part of the renovation was updating the roof and siding, at a total cost of $56,953.

Photo by David Lauer

But Amy was still intrigued by the property, particularly because she and her husband, Corey Szopinski—who also works as her namesake firm’s general contractor—were looking for a place where their two young kids could roam.

"The house is located at 11,000 feet on Mount Bross," she says. "The area around it is known as South Park, which is where the show South Park is set. It’s charming and remote, and it requires a 4x4 to access it in the winter." 

The living room sofa is from Article and the coffee table is from Burke Decor. The rug is vintage, and the fur chair was found at Urban Outfitters.

The living room sofa is from Article, and the coffee table is from Burke Decor. The rug is vintage, and the couple found the fur chair at Urban Outfitters. It cost $10,228 to fully furnish the cabin.

Photo by David Lauer

The cabin itself had potential, too, given that its sharp A-frame had been mostly preserved since it was first built in 1976—although the interior had a rickety wood spiral staircase, a dark kitchen, and classic builder-grade finishes Amy describes as "shabby." The couple dreamed of updating the space with a clean, Scandinavian palette and contemporary touches. They knew that it would take a lot of work, but they were also sure that their determination would be worth it in the end. 

$1,709
HVAC System
$8,529
Electrical
$51,266
Labor
$56,953
Roof & Siding
$10,533
Windows
$1,327
Doors
$10,228
Furnishings
$3,247
Appliances
$8,111
Cabinetry
$8,189
Tile
$2,396
Spiral Stairs
$1,568
Lighting
Grand Total: $164,056
The family dog, Bruno, "loves to nap by the fireplace,

The family dog, Bruno, "loves to nap by the fireplace," Amy says. The Reform kitchen cabinets are painted a custom blue by Sherwin Williams.

Photo by David Lauer

"The classic A-Frame shape had to stay," Amy says. "It has a cozy, nostalgic vibe—but we knew it needed a refresh to make it ours. We wanted to find a way to create a beautiful space that was warm and stylish, with nothing that is expected in a cabin—on a very tight budget."

The couple quickly discovered that updating an old cabin in a remote area would be challenging, simply because they had to coordinate how to get there regularly themselves—and find seamless ways for supplies and workers to arrive, too. 

Pigliacampo decided to paint the interiors white, the most cost-effective detail of the renovation, and add a ladder to the second level.

Amy decided to paint the interiors white—the most cost-effective detail of the renovation—and add a ladder to the second level. 

Photo by David Lauer

"The cabin was not safe for our kids during the renovation, so we had to adopt a divide-and-conquer mentality," she says. "Furthermore, it’s almost impossible to get quality trades to do work in remote spots on small projects. Luckily, we found a few."

They kicked off many weekends with ambitious plans, which were quickly derailed when they realized that they didn’t have the necessary tools and needed to drive 45 minutes to the nearest hardware store. They also had to contend with snow—which sometimes grew to be so high that there was nowhere to park. And then there was the time a tree fell on their power line, which halted work entirely.

"The concrete Clé tiles have light and dark blue colors to match the kitchen, with a white triangles that match the slope of the roof and the color of the sky,

"The concrete Clé tiles have light- and dark-blue colors to match the kitchen, with white triangles that match the slope of the roof and the color of the sky," Amy says of the powder room. 

Photo by David Lauer

"That was pretty scary," Amy remembers. "Imagine a 100-foot-tall pine being held up by an electrical wire—the force of it nearly pulled the mast and service panel off the house. In the end it worked out well, though, because we got an electrician to drive up from Denver to help us. Now, the house’s electricity is safe and up to code." 

As work progressed, the team installed a seam roof and siding, a new spiral staircase, and a window in the kitchen, which they painted a custom Sherwin Williams shade of blue that’s echoed in the geometric powder room. Amy also made the tough decision to paint the interior wood planks white, given that they were so beat up from neglect, and then leaned on a navy-and-black palette to provide a fun yet moody contrast.

A bedroom is tucked into the tip of the A-frame.

A bedroom is tucked into the tip of the A-frame. 

Photo by David Lauer

"We also had wildfire threats in the area during construction—nothing super close yet, but there were enough warnings that we knew we needed to take action," she says. "We spent a small fortune clearing away all trees within 30 feet of the house. Now, we have a ton of firewood—and our views have improved!"

The project started in January 2021 and finished in March 2022, just in time for the family to enjoy the last of the season’s snow before spring. Looking back, Amy is happy to have come across this cabin’s listing, even though she also jokes about how hard the project was. 

The primary bathroom's terrazzo tiles are from Daltile. They replaced the original wood spiral staircase with a metal one, for a sleeker and safer finish.

The primary bathroom’s terrazzo finish is from Daltile. Amy and Corey replaced the original rickety wood spiral staircase with a metal one, for a sleeker (and safer) finish. 

Photo by David Lauer

"My advice would be to start marriage counseling the day you sign the deed," she says, laughing. "Kidding aside, we’re proud of what we accomplished and it feels like we gave this cabin a new life."

Floor Plan of Camp Altezza by Amy Pigliacampo

Related Reading:

You Can Build This Tiny A-Frame Cabin With $3,000 and One Weekend

A Decrepit 1970s A-Frame in Minnesota Is Reborn as a Cozy Family Escape

A Designer Peels Back Layers of Shag Carpet to Rescue a ’60s A-Frame

Project Details:

General Contractor: Corey Szopinski

Interior Designer: Amy Pigliacampo / @amypigliacampo

Builder: Ron Scarpa, Blue River Builders & Bart Hernandez, Pandas Company

Cabinetry Design: Debbie Fowler, Reform Cabinets 

Siding and Roofing: Joel Thomas, RoofTec

Tile: Wayne Burch, Straight Line Tile

Electrical: Ed Jueschke, SJO Electrical


This Accordion-Like Home Listed for $6.5M Has a Glass Living Room Inspired by the Louvre

Permalink - Posted on 2022-08-10 16:59

Known as the Origami House, the 8,500-square-foot dwelling is the brainchild of renowned architectural firm Leroy Street Studio.

Known as the Origami House, the 8,500-square-foot dwelling is the brainchild of renowned architectural firm Leroy Street Studio.

Location: 10 Dragonwood Lane, Weston, Connecticut

Price: $6,500,000

Architect: Leroy Street Studio

Year Built: 2013

Footprint: 8,586 square feet (three bedrooms, five baths)

Lot Size: 678,229 square feet (15.57 acres)

From the agent: "Retreat to the Origami House, defining art as architecture. Set on 15-plus acres, the property borders a nature reserve. Only nature and its inhabitants accompany as you ascend up the private drive punctuated by a cherry orchard and pass by the property’s lighted tennis court, before arriving at the intimate courtyard to the main residence. This 8,500-square-foot home is the creation of well-known architectural firm Leroy Street Studio, Manhattan. The home’s architectural design is a mathematical masterpiece where individual cubes appear to fold into each other in intricate ceiling and window elevations, only to reveal large open spaces that invite nature’s energy inside."

An aerial view showcasing the home's individual cubes which fold into each other.

An aerial view showcases the home’s individual segments, which fold into each other, as well as the expansive nature reserve surrounding the property.

Photo courtesy of Compass

An expansive, open floor plan allows the main living spaces to effortlessly mingle.

An open floor plan connects the main living spaces.

Photo courtesy of Compass

Photo courtesy of Compass

The home’s glass-encased living space was inspired by I.M. Pei’s design for the pyramid at the Louvre.

The home’s glass-encased living space was inspired by I.M. Pei’s design for the pyramid at the Louvre.

Photo courtesy of Compass

Slides glass doors stretch across the rear facade, creating postcard-worthy views.

Sliding glass doors stretch across the rear facade, framing picturesque views.

Photo courtesy of Compass

Photo courtesy of Compass

The dining rooms opens up to the adjacent terrace and one of two waterfalls.

The dining room opens up to the adjacent terrace and one of two waterfalls.

Photo courtesy of Compass

Photo courtesy of Compass

The principal suite includes direct access to a private outdoor spa area.

The principal suite opens directly to a private outdoor spa area.

Photo courtesy of Compass

Photo courtesy of Compass