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Jordan Merrick

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Infant Formula Preparation with Shortcuts

Permalink - Posted on 2018-11-28 15:45, modified on 2018-12-04 00:06

Our two-month-old daughter is formula fed. My wife and I prepare a batch of bottles every day using this formula mixing pitcher so they’re readily available at feeding time. Some arithmetic is needed to work out how much formula powder to add to a certain volume of water, and the amount of formula we need to prepare steadily increases as she grows. To give our sleep-deprived brains a break and avoid any miscalculations, I created some shortcuts to help out and do the math for us.

Formula Calculator works out how much formula we should prepare for the day, based on our daughter’s current weight (in pounds and ounces). The general rule of thumb for babies up to six months old is to offer 2.5 ounces of formula per pound of body weight in a 24 hour period. Her weight is entered when running the shortcut, along with how many feeding sessions to expect that day 1. The amount of formula to prepare, along with how much to fill each bottle with, is then displayed.

The Formula Calculator shortcut calculates how much formula we should prepare for the day.
The Formula Calculator shortcut calculates how much formula we should prepare for the day.

This next shortcut, Formula Prep, is the one I use the most. It calculates how much formula powder to add to a specified amount of water. Most formula powder in the US specifies one scoop (8.7g) of powder for every 2 fluid ounces of water. I specify how much water is in the pitcher and it calculates the amount formula powder to add—both in grams and scoops. I prefer to measure by weight as it’s all too easy to lose count of the scoops being added.

The Formula Prep shortcut takes a specified amount of water and works out how much formula powder I need to use.
The Formula Prep shortcut takes a specified amount of water and works out how much formula powder I need to use.

Prepared formula can be stored in the refrigerator for up to 24 hours. After that, it must be discarded. Formula Reminder is a shortcut I run once I’ve prepared formula that creates a reminder with an alarm set 24 hours later.

This shortcut creates a reminder so I don't forget to dispose of any leftover formula after 24 hours.
This shortcut creates a reminder so I don't forget to dispose of any leftover formula after 24 hours.
  1. The number of feeding sessions can vary from day to day. We’ve been tracking our daughter’s feeds since birth and she’s currently averaging about six sessions per day.


Moment 72 Hour Holiday Sale

Permalink - Posted on 2018-11-26 16:55, modified on 2018-12-04 00:06

Moment is discounting all of their lenses, cases, and accessories by 20% and offering $5 shipping worldwide for the next three days when you use the code 72HOURSALE during checkout. Moment’s lenses are a core part of my iPhone photography kit and I highly recommend them.

Here are a few photos I’ve taken with Moment lenses:

Taken with iPhone X and Moment Macro lens.
Taken with iPhone X and Moment Macro lens.
Taken with iPhone X and Moment Wide lens.
Taken with iPhone X and Moment Wide lens.
Taken with iPhone X and Moment Wide lens.
Taken with iPhone X and Moment Wide lens.
Taken with iPhone X and Moment Macro lens.
Taken with iPhone X and Moment Macro lens.

If you’re thinking about getting started with Moment lenses, I recommend picking up the Wide lens first. It’s a versatile lens you’ll get a lot of use from and the one I like to use the most. You’ll also need one of their photo cases for your phone—this is what the lenses attach to.

For iPhone X and Xs users1, there’s also a battery photo case with built-in shutter button. When used with Moment’s iOS camera app, the button supports half-press to focus. If you prefer to use any other camera app, it operates the same as a volume button to trigger the shutter.

Moment’s camera app has some advanced features, such as manual controls, and can also shoot in RAW. If you’re a stickler for EXIF data, you can select the Moment lens you’re using and the app embeds the information within the photo’s metadata.

  1. The case is MFi certified for iPhone X, though iPhone Xs certification is still pending. I use the battery photo case with an iPhone Xs and it works fine, and it’s expected that the case be certified in the near future. ↩


Importing Instagram Photos Into Jekyll

Permalink - Posted on 2018-09-14 15:15, modified on 2018-12-04 00:06

I often post photos to Instagram or Unsplash. Now that I’m using my website for microblogging, I’ve started publishing my photos here as well. I’ll have more ownership over the content and, should either of these services ever go away, my photos will still be available.

I’ve also imported into my website a copy of all the photos I’ve posted to Instagram–about 1,200 photos spanning almost eight years. To do this, I requested an archive of all my Instagram data, copied the photos to my site, and generated all of the posts using Shortcuts.

The ZIP archive provided by Instagram contains a copy of everything uploaded, along with JSON files containing data about each post, comment, like, and more. While the archive contains all of this data, I was only interested in the photos.

Extracting the photos

The archive’s photos/ directory is neatly structured, with all photos organized into subdirectories using a YYYYMM date format (e.g., 201804/). The media.json file contains a photos dictionary, where each item contains information about each photo1:

  • path: The relative path to the photo.
  • location: The location the photo was tagged with. This is blank if no location was specified.
  • taken_at: The date the photo was posted.
  • caption: The caption of that photo. Similar to location, this is blank if no caption was included.

The first step was to import all the photos into the media/ directory of my website. I extracted the archive using Documents on my iPad , then created a new ZIP file containing just the photos/ directory. I opened this in Working Copy and extracted this new archive into my website’s git repository. After committing and pushing the changes, all of those photos were live and available to link to.

Creating the posts

Next, I copied media.json to iCloud Drive, then used Shortcuts (née Workflow) to create this shortcut that performs the following actions:

  • Loops through every item within the media.json file’s photos dictionary.
  • Gets the value for each item’s path, location, taken_at, and caption.
  • Creates a text file for each photo with the required Jekyll front matter using the values retrieved above, and sets the category to photo. The caption, if available, is included in the post.
  • Sets an appropriate name for the text file, based on the date information from taken_at.
  • Creates a ZIP file of all the text files that have been generated.

This is an example of a text file that the shortcut generates:

---layout: microblogpostcategory: photodate: '2018-09-02T14:54:40'title: ''slug: '18090212145440'mf-photo:  - https://www.jordanmerrick.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/11/e22680154ef0b993e870789b69764673.jpg---I love Central Park...

The photo URL is included in mf-photo as I’m using the same template I use for microblog posts, and that field was established when I set up the Micropub to GitHub service I use. You can easily change this to whatever you need.

Once complete, I opened the archive in Working Copy and extracted it into my site’s microblog/_posts/ directory.

Making changes to my Jekyll template

With my photos imported, I made a few small tweaks to my Jekyll template files. My microblog archive page displays a 10-word excerpt of the micropost’s text and uses it as the post’s link. However, many of my photos had no caption. As a result, there was no text to create an excerpt from, so Jekyll was skipping them and they weren’t being listed.

To make sure all my photos were listed on my archive page—and distinguish between plain text and photo posts—I added an emoji icon for any microblog posts that have the photo category set. I also edited the template for individual microblog posts to display the location information (along with the emoji pushpin symbol), if available.

Finally, I created additional JSON and RSS feeds that only include microblog posts with photos.

  1. Instagram treats posts with multiple photos as separate posts in the data archive. That was fine for me, as I’ve used only that feature maybe two or three times. 


Apple Watch Apps Are Dead, Long Live Apple Watch Apps

Permalink - Posted on 2018-08-09 01:21, modified on 2018-12-04 00:06

9to5Mac reports that Instapaper has dropped Apple Watch support:

Just two weeks after announcing it was going independent, popular read-it-later service Instapaper has updated its iOS application to remove support for Apple Watch. Instapaper was one of the first applications to ever support Apple Watch, launching its client on Apple Watch release day in 2015…

On Apple Watch, Instapaper allowed users to access text-to-speech playback of saved articles. The app also supported reorganizing articles, “liking” them, deleting or archiving, and more. While those features were originally hidden behind a $2.99 per month Premium upgrade, they became free in 2016 after Instapaper’s acquisition by Pinterest.

Instapaper is just the latest iOS app to drop support for its Apple Watch client. Earlier this year, Instagram killed off its Apple Watch application, as did Slack, Whole Food, eBay, and several others.

The reasons Instapaper had for dropping Apple Watch support are similar to those we’ve heard before. Apple deprecated WatchKit 1.0 and requires existing apps to be updated, but app usage was so low that it wasn’t worth the effort.

But why was usage so low? Some see this as a sign that Apple Watch just isn’t a viable app platform, but I disagree. I think the main reason why some apps suffer from poor adoption is that they simply lacked any meaningful purpose. Apps like Instapaper weren’t solving a particular problem or serving a need. As a result, they felt forced and unnecessary.

At WWDC in 1997, Steve Jobs responded to a question from the audience with one of his most memorable quotes:

You’ve got to start with the customer experience and work backwards to the technology. You can’t start with the technology and try to figure out where you can sell it.

This is as true today as it was 21 years ago, and I’d argue it explains why some Apple Watch apps didn’t take. It isn’t because the platform isn’t viable, it’s simply that some developers started with the technology and tried to come up with a reason to use it. I use Instapaper across my iOS devices, but I never used the Apple Watch app because organizing, deleting, and liking articles with it never made any sense to me.

As watchOS matures, apps that don’t have a compelling purpose are disappearing. This is a good thing, because it leaves us with apps that are better suited for Apple Watch. However, I am thankful that Apple Watch apps like Instapaper existed in the first place, as they paved the way by showcasing functionality or demonstrating how versatile Apple Watch can be—even if the apps themselves weren’t successful.


Apple Removes Apps From Their Affiliate Program

Permalink - Posted on 2018-08-02 05:10, modified on 2018-12-04 00:06

Members of the iTunes Affiliate Program (myself included) received an email from Apple earlier today that announced iOS and Mac apps would no longer be included:

Thank you for participating in the affiliate program for apps. With the launch of the new App Store on both iOS and macOS and their increased methods of app discovery, we will be removing apps from the affiliate program. Starting on October 1st, 2018, commissions for iOS and Mac apps and in-app content will be removed from the program. All other content types (music, movies, books, and TV) remain in the affiliate program.

This stinks, especially as it comes less than 24 hours after Apple’s earning call that announced yet another record quarter. Was that 7% rate really eating into their bottom line? I do find it interesting that the only content being dropped from the affiliate program is that which Apple takes a sizable cut of. iTunes Store and Books content remains, so why only apps? I can’t help but think it’s because Apple pay affiliates from their own 30% take, and they just don’t want to do it anymore.

Federico Viticci describes the move as downright hostile and petty, and I completely agree with him. This decision is a shitty one on Apple’s part, and it feels like it was made only with a balance sheet as consideration.

There are many great sites within the Apple community that contribute to app sales and adoption of Apple devices through app recommendations. This decision to end affiliate links hurts the very people who will have had a noticeable influence on the purchase of apps. Eli Hodapp over at Touch Arcade, one of the most popular iOS game sites, isn’t even sure how the site can continue.

I can say with absolute certainty that the majority of apps I’ve purchased and enjoyed over the years have been through reviews and recommendations that used affiliate links. That’s how I, and many others, discover new apps. I enjoy reading app reviews on MacStories or hearing recommendations in an episode of Mac Power Users. One of my worries is that we’re going to see far fewer meaningful recommendations from the community. Sites like Touch Arcade are going to find it extremely difficult to survive, and other publications may no longer publish app recommendations at all.

Apple is one of the world’s richest companies with billions of dollars in the bank. Dropping apps from the affiliate program after all these years just feels like a dick move.