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Art Nouveau Architect Henry van de Velde

Permalink - Posted on 2019-03-18 17:25

Noted architect Henry van de Velde (1863-1957) designed gorgeous, modern buildings and interiors in his now famous Art Nouveau style.

In the late 19th century Flemish architect Henry van de Velde was the frontrunner for Art Nouveau architecture. He was one of the first modern architects to exclusively favor the "form follows function" theory in architecture. Images are courtesy of www.vandevelde2013.de

What Van de Velde was to Art Nouveau architecture Walter Gropius was to Bauhaus. The stunning Art Nouveau buildings he designed still exist in Germany’s Thuringer and Saxony region.

Van de Velde and two other Belgian architects, Victor Horta and Paul Hankar were the founders of Art Nouveau, or, Jugendstil architecture as it is called in Germany. He was one of the first modern architects to develop the theory "form follows function".

In the late 19th century Flemish architect Henry van de Velde was the frontrunner for Art Nouveau architecture. He was one of the first modern architects to exclusively favor the "form follows function" theory in architecture. Images are courtesy of www.vandevelde2013.de

After starting his career as a painter in Belgium, Van de Velde turned to architecture and design after becoming enamored with the works of William Morris and John Ruskin of the Arts and Crafts Movement (1860-1910).

The main building of Bauhaus University. Designed by Henry van de Velde in 1904 when it was the School of Art and Applied Arts. The design and installation of large windows provided the students with natural light. Van de Velde was the director there from 1902 - 1917. The building is now a UNESCO World Heritage Site.

One of his most important commissions came in 1895 when he designed the interiors and furniture for the famed Maison de l’Art Nouveau in Paris. Refusing to bend to the process of historical patterns, which he thought were banal and hideous, he put his Art Nouveau mark on everything; buildings, furnishings, china, wallpapers, and even draperies.

Van de Velde designed this smaller building of Bauhaus University in 1905. He took particular care to arc the building to give the inside a cavernous effect. This building is also listed as a UNESCO World Heritage Site.

In 1902 the Grand Duke of Weimar contracted Van de Velde to design two buildings for his School of Art and Applied Arts, now Bauhaus University. It was from these that the Bauhaus style of architecture emerged. They are now listed as UNESCO World Heritage Sites.

Hendy van de Velde's house, Hohe Papplin Haus in Weimar. Note the bowed out large windows, very Art Nouveau in design, that let in an abundance of natural light. Van de Velde designed the furnishings to match the shape of the room.

During the time that Van de Velde was director of the school, 1902 to 1917, he designed several houses in Thuringer and Saxony. In each he adhered to the principal of exposing the interiors to natural light with large windows that brought nature inside.

A beautiful example of this is his house in Weimar, Hohe Papplin Haus, with its stunning sky jutting angles. Another is the airy interior he designed for the Nietzsche Archives that houses the papers of noted German philosopher Frederick Nietzsche.

With the outbreak of World War I Van de Velde was forced to return to his native Belgium. It was he who recommended to the Grand Duke that Walter Gropius be appointed his successor as superintendent of the School of Art and Applied Arts.

In celebration of Henry van de Velde’s 150th birthday events and exhibits will be take place in Thuringer and Saxony throughout the year. For information click here.


Design Icon: Walter Gropius

Permalink - Posted on 2019-03-15 23:57

Alongside Le Corbusier and Frank Lloyd Wright, German architect Walter Gropius was a foundational figure in modern architecture design.

Best-known as the founder of the German art school Staatliches Bauhaus, where he served as director for many years, Gropius also founded the Architect's Collaborative (TAC) in 1945, and designed the D51 armchair and the F51 armchair and sofa. Before it went bankrupt in 1995, TAC was among the world's most esteemed architectural firms and is credited with works including the Harvard Graduate Center in Cambridge, Massachusetts, the Bauhaus Archive in Berlin, Germany, and the University of Baghdad in Baghdad, Iraq.

Cover photo by Max Dupain via Wikimedia Commons.

This photograph shows a young Walter Gropius in 1919, the year that Gropius became the successor to the master of the Grand-Ducal Saxon School of Arts and Crafts, the school which, under Gropius' guidance, became the Staatliches Bauhaus.

This photograph shows a young Walter Gropius in 1919, the year that Gropius became the successor to the master of the Grand-Ducal Saxon School of Arts and Crafts, the school which, under Gropius' guidance, became the Staatliches Bauhaus.

Photo by Louis Held

His first wife, Alma Mahler, was the widow of esteemed composer Gustav Mahler. Serving as a sergeant in the first World War, Gropius won an Iron Cross for his service. On a pretext, he escaped Nazi Germany in the 1930s with his protege Marcel Breuer and his second wife, Ilse Frank, establishing himself as a professor at the Harvard Graduate School of Design in Cambridge, Massachusetts. Gropius died in 1969 after becoming a naturalized U.S. citizen. 

The now-landmarked Gropius House in Lincoln, Massachusetts, was designed by the architect and his wife Ise when he accepted a teaching position at Harvard in 1937.

Beyond his pioneering work as an architect, instructor and designer, Gropius was a theorist and a visionary. In his 1923 essay, "The Theory and Organization of the Bauhaus," Gropius outlined the governing philosophy of the Staatliches Bauhaus and posed critical, forward-thinking questions that echo visibly through all the subsequent ages of modern design. "But what is space," he asks, "how can it be understood and given a form?"

While the first home Gropius constructed in the United States was his own home in Lincoln, Massachusetts, his first official commission was the Hagerty House in Cohasset, Massachusetts.

While the first home Gropius constructed in the United States was his own home in Lincoln, Massachusetts, his first official commission was the Hagerty House in Cohasset, Massachusetts.

Photo by Dean Kaufman

Walter Gropius, TAC (The Architects’ Collaborative) and Hisham A. Munir, University of Baghdad Campus, 1957-, in Baghdad, Iraq.
Founded in 1919 by Walter Gropius, the Bauhaus school was housed in the former Grand-Ducal Saxon Academy of Fine Arts and the School of Arts and Crafts by Henry Van de Velde. One of the founding principles of the school was to unify all creative efforts by combining art theory with practical workshops. The building shown here housed most of the classrooms, studios, and workshops. Renovated in 1996, it is now home to a new Bauhaus school, named and modeled after Gropius's original program, which was ended in 1933 due to pressure from the Nazi regime.
Although initially established in the German town of Weimar, the Bauhaus relocated to the industrial city of Dessau. This building, constructed by Staatliches Bauhaus founder and director Walter Gropius, was the second home of the renowned school.
Walter Gropius designed the F-51 armchair for the director's room at the Bauhaus in Weimar. Filled with polyurethane foam, the armchair fabric or leather coated armchair is supported by an ash or maple frame.
Not all of Gropius's buildings have fared well under public scrutiny. Case in point is New York's MetLife building (originally the Pan Am building), designed with Emery Roth & Sons and Pietro Belluschi.


Knoll Straight Chair

Permalink - Posted on 2019-03-15 21:10

Originally designed in the late 1940s, the Straight Chair has been reintroduced by Knoll. George Nakashima's extraordinary blend of the organic, natural qualities of wood and clean modern design formed this Modernist interpretation of the traditional Windsor chair. Featuring natural, low-sheen finishes and live wood grain patterns, the Straight Chair epitomizes Nakashima and his craft. 

Based in Pennsylvania, Knoll has been an international leader in contemporary home and workplace furniture since 1939. Their motto is that Knoll is Modern Always, because modern always works, which reflects their commitment to pioneering vision and sustainability to help enhance and evolve the environment of contemporary life. Bringing a big name to modern elegance, Knoll offers a unique line of luxurious furniture from office chairs to outdoor dining tables that should not be missed.

Photo Courtesy of Knoll


A Serene Nakashima Bathroom Survives

Permalink - Posted on 2019-03-15 21:04

George Nakashima’s sublime Japanese-style bathroom endures at his rural estate.

The sunken bathtub in George Nakashima’s Sanso Villa mimics the shape of a swimming pool on the grounds. His daughter, Mira Nakashima, took over the studio after his death and now lives and works on the property. “A Japanese garden often has a central pond derived from the character for ‘heart’ or ‘spirit,’ and this may be an abstraction of that character,” she says of the tub’s sculptural form.

Completed in 1977, the Sanso Villa, or "reception house," was the last of 13 buildings George Nakashima designed for his property in New Hope, Pennsylvania. He spared no expense in the space, which was used to host guests and hold dinner parties, incorporating rare woods and lavish materials throughout. Aware of the looming late-1970s energy crisis, he also wanted a structure that did not depend on fossil fuels and purchased a wood-fired boiler from Japan to heat water for his playful interpretation of a traditional soaking tub in the bathroom

The sunken bathtub in George Nakashima’s Sanso Villa mimics the shape of a swimming pool on the grounds. His daughter, Mira Nakashima, took over the studio after his death and now lives and works on the property. “A Japanese garden often has a central pond derived from the character for ‘heart’ or ‘spirit,’ and this may be an abstraction of that character,” she says of the tub’s sculptural form.

Blue and white penny tiles imported from Japan form the abstracted patterns, which Nakashima designed with help from his grandchildren. "He thought it would be fun for the kids to have their artwork preserved in the bath area," says his daughter, Mira, pointing out their names set into the floor and bathtub. He built the towel rack from holly and used cedar and teak elsewhere in the room. Like much of Nakashima’s work, the space is connected to nature: Sliding glass doors lead to a moon-viewing platform with a panorama of the valley. "Luckily," Mira says, "we don’t have neighbors nearby." 

 


A Quick Guide to New York’s Hudson Yards, the $25 Billion Mini-City Opening Today

Permalink - Posted on 2019-03-15 21:00

Impressive, edgy—and yes, Instagram-worthy—here are the highlights of the sprawling, multipurpose campus opening in Manhattan today.

Designed as a city within a city, the $25 billion Hudson Yards project, which opens today on Manhattan’s far west side, is a colossal architectural and technological achievement. Built entirely from scratch atop an active rail yard, the experiment in large-scale urban planning is punctuated by multiple venues that dazzle and delight—including the Elkus Manfredi Architects-designed Shops & Restaurants. While big-box stores like Uniqlo and Sephora may be found here, Hudson Yards as a whole is chock-full of modern design statements that beckon to be touched and experienced (and Instagrammed, natch). The best part? They’re all open to the public.

There’s a ton to see and do at the Hudson Yards—below, we distill the development down to what we’re most excited about.

The Floor of Discovery

Snark Park by Snarkitecture debuts with the art installation "Lost and Found," a forest of white columns distorted by shape and materials.

Snark Park by Snarkitecture debuts with the art installation "Lost and Found," a forest of white columns distorted by shape and materials.

Courtesy of Snarkitecture

To distinguish itself from other malls, The Shops & Restaurants at Hudson Yards offers a unique prospect for shoppers called "The Floor of Discovery." Spread out across the entire second floor, the spaces are dedicated to digitally native brands, experiential shopping, and food and beverage concepts. 

Among the highlights are Snark Park, a permanent exhibition space from Snarkitecture that will feature a tri-annually rotating schedule of playful and immersive design environments (not to mention a Kith Treats ice cream shop), and Batch, the San Francisco–based home and lifestyle collective that offers curated, up-and-coming products and innovative brands perfect for home furnishing (the launch collection is dubbed "Batch Hello").

San Francisco–based Batch creates shoppable living spaces to bridge design and retail.

San Francisco–based Batch creates shoppable living spaces to bridge design and retail.

Courtesy of BATCH

"It’s such a great synergy because we do a lot of [shoppable] home staging and so being able to be part of the development that has all this residential attached is a really great opportunity," says Lindsay Meyer, Batch cofounder and CEO. "Bringing things we know our audience in California love to be exposed to the New York market, in a stylish and welcoming home environment, is exciting." 

Adds Daniel Arsham, a principal of Snarkitecture, along with Alex Mustonen and Benjamin Porto, "In many locations we’ve been installed inside of another space, and we couldn't control the space in its entirety. Here, from the merchandise down to even the experience of waiting in line, we were able to curate it all and build it from the ground-up. We created the ultimate controlled experience."

Forty Five Ten

Decked out in a millennial-magnet shade of pink, Forty Five Ten woos younger shoppers.

Decked out in a millennial-magnet shade of pink, Forty Five Ten woos younger shoppers.

Courtesy of Forty Five 10

Encompassing 16,000 square feet across four separate retail spaces on the fifth floor of The Shops & Restaurants, Dallas–based luxury boutique Forty Five Ten’s Manhattan debut echoes the retailer’s penchant for unusual design. Snarkitecture created the artful storefronts in collaboration with Forty Five Ten president and creative director Kristen Cole and Headington Companies, which includes an asymmetrical glass brick facade and grid-like retail displays within the stores. The women’s store is highlighted by a pink-painted area evocative of an optical illusion of consecutive shops that, while purposefully disorienting, is Instagram heaven. Custom Calico wallpapers enhance the walls in the 4510/Six and vintage boutiques, while the latter also features multiple marmoreal surfaces.

The Vessel

Heatherwick Studio's Vessel is part sculpture, part public park.

Heatherwick Studio's Vessel is part sculpture, part public park.

Courtesy of Michael Moran for Related-Oxford

Boasting nearly one mile of vertical climb, the interactive sculpture known as the Vessel is the Big Apple’s newest social media attraction. Imagined by Thomas Heatherwick and Heatherwick Studio as a focal point of the Hudson Yards complex, the non-corrosive structure is comprised of 154 interconnecting flights of stairs—almost 2,500 individual steps and 80 landings—that overlook the Public Square and Gardens. Expanding outwards, the Vessel is, quite simply, the inversion of all the buildings surrounding it. So soaring is this new landmark (open to the public via free, timed-entry tickets) that it’s already being called New York’s Eiffel Tower. 

The Shed

The 4,000-ton outer shell of the Shed glides along rails to retract telescopically on six-foot-tall wheels.

The 4,000-ton outer shell of the Shed glides along rails to retract telescopically on six-foot-tall wheels.

Courtesy of Timothy Schenck for Related-Oxford

With the luxury 15 Hudson Yards condominium high-rise cantilevered over it, the Shed is certainly transformative—both literally and figuratively. Inspired by the adjacent High Line and designed by Diller Scofidio + Renfro to be reminiscent of a train car, the 200,000-square-foot space is an all-encompassing performing arts center. Recently named in honor of former New York mayor Michael Bloomberg, its remarkable design features a 4,000-ton outer shell that glides along rails to retract telescopically on six-foot-tall wheels, morphing the space into an open plaza. The layout of the eight-level space is entirely flexible and mobile, encased in Teflon-based polymer "pillows," cross-hatched with steel, that, from afar, look almost soft enough to hug. 

The Edge

The Edge is poised to be the Western Hemisphere's tallest outdoor observation deck.

The Edge is poised to be the Western Hemisphere's tallest outdoor observation deck.

Courtesy of Hudson Yards

Due to open sometime in 2020, the Edge, hovering 1,100 feet above the ground, will be the tallest outdoor observation deck in the Western Hemisphere and the fifth highest in the world (it will just beat out the Empire State Building’s observation deck, in fact). Extending 65 feet out from the 100th floor of 30 Hudson Yards as it pierces the sky, the Edge will certainly be both an exceptional—and exhilarating—experience for visitors. 

"Edge offers a new perspective on New York from a vantage point that has never existed before," says Jason Horkin, executive director of Hudson Yards Experiences. "You become completely absorbed in the vastness of our iconic skyline."

Learn more about the Hudson Yards.

Related Reading: 5 Iconic Buildings by Kevin Roche That Shifted the Urban Landscape


Design Icon: George Nakashima

Permalink - Posted on 2019-03-15 20:53

A skilled and spiritual craftsman, George Nakashima crafted wood furniture that elevated and showcased natural forms.

George Nakashima.  Photo: Nakashima Archives

Working with a reverence for his material that bordered on spiritual, woodworker and designer George Nakashima (1915-1990) created one of the more influential legacies in furniture in the 20th century. Cutting wood was like cutting diamonds, he once said, a philosophy reflected in his body of work, filled with intricate pieces that preserved and magnified the beauty of every knot and grain. He would often keep boards around his workshop in Bucks County, Pennsylvania, for years before they would reveal themselves to him.

George Nakashima in his workshop.

Nakashima studied architecture at École Américaine des Beaux Arts and M.I.T. and began working in the ‘30s, at one point journeying to India to design an ashram. His work earned him the fitting Sanskrit name, Sundarananda ("one who delights in beauty"). He returned from overseas to set up shop in Seattle in the early ‘40s before, like other Japanese-Americans during WWII, he was interned by the government. While at Camp Minidoka in Idaho, Nakashima met a fellow internee who was a master Japanese craftsman, who taught him traditional practices and philosophies that informed his future work. His career blossomed after the war, when he began creating pieces for companies like Knoll and Widdicomb-Mueller, as well as his own custom work, such as a 200-piece collection for Nelson Rockefeller’s mansion. His reverence for nature and inner beauty was reflected in one of his last projects, a massive peace altar installed in the Cathedral of St. John the Divine in New York City. His designs are still being made by his daughter and the staff at George Nakashima Woodworker.

Splay-Leg Table

Impressed by the simple elegance and understated forms of his work, Hans and Florence Knoll added Nakashima’s work to their roster. This table was designed in 1946 with a low-sheen finish and live grain patterns.

Impressed by the simple elegance and understated forms of his work, Hans and Florence Knoll added Nakashima’s work to their roster. This table was designed in 1946 with a low-sheen finish and live grain patterns.

Photo Courtesy of George Nakashima Woodworker, S.A.

Straight Chair

Another original Knoll design from 1946, the Straight Chair is Nakashima’s spin on the standard Windsor, incorporating traditional techniques, Nakashima sometimes called himself a "Japanese Shaker," in reference to his fusion of classic, Modernist, and Shaker styles.

Another original Knoll design from 1946, the Straight Chair is Nakashima’s spin on the standard Windsor, incorporating traditional techniques, Nakashima sometimes called himself a "Japanese Shaker," in reference to his fusion of classic, Modernist, and Shaker styles.

Photo Courtesy of George Nakashima Woodworker, S.A.

Conoid Bench

An intricate example of Nakashima placing minimal adornments on the wood, merely capturing it, preserving it and giving it a second life.

An intricate example of Nakashima placing minimal adornments on the wood, merely capturing it, preserving it and giving it a second life.

Photo Courtesy of George Nakashima Woodworker, S.A.

Mira Chair

These three-legged chairs were designed in 1950 for George’s daughter, Mira, who now runs George Nakashima Woodworker, the company that carries on the Nakashima legacy.

These three-legged chairs were designed in 1950 for George’s daughter, Mira, who now runs George Nakashima Woodworker, the company that carries on the Nakashima legacy.

Photo Courtesy of George Nakashima Woodworker, S.A.

Conoid Table

Pieces from this series, named after Nakashima’s Conoid workshop, which he opened in 1957, focus on free-edge forms, respecting and conforming to the natural shape of the wood, and often employ cantilever technology.

Pieces from this series, named after Nakashima’s Conoid workshop, which he opened in 1957, focus on free-edge forms, respecting and conforming to the natural shape of the wood, and often employ cantilever technology.

Photo Courtesy of George Nakashima Woodworker, S.A.

George Nakashima with his daughter Mira in his workshop.

Slab Coffee Table

An example of one of Nakashima’s most iconic designs, this large piece was crafted from walnut.

An example of one of Nakashima’s most iconic designs, this large piece was crafted from walnut.

Photo Courtesy of George Nakashima Woodworker, S.A.

Asa-No-Ha Lamp

These intricately patterned lamps were created to illuminate his work at a show overseas. Some of these reside in the Rockefeller’s mansion.

These intricately patterned lamps were created to illuminate his work at a show overseas. Some of these reside in the Rockefeller’s mansion.

Photo Courtesy of George Nakashima Woodworker, S.A.

Chigaidana Shelf

Initially built for Widdicomb-Mueller in the ‘60s, these Mondrian-like forms draw inspiration from Japanese architecture.

Initially built for Widdicomb-Mueller in the ‘60s, these Mondrian-like forms draw inspiration from Japanese architecture.

Photo Courtesy of George Nakashima Woodworker, S.A.

Shop George Nakashima's Designs

Knoll Nakashima Tray

George Nakashima is best known for his unique pieces of furniture, which are prized for their respect for the natural forms of the tree and the inherent grain of the wood. The Tray was designed in 2008 under the guidance of George Nakashima’s daughter, Mira. It is standard constructed of solid Douglas Fir that is quarter-cut and finished in a clear low-sheen finish. The edge details are available in solid Brazilian Santos or solid Wenge. Feature the designer's signature and KnollStudio logo on the underside. Photo Courtesy of Knoll

Knoll Straight Chair

Originally designed in the late 1940s, the Straight Chair has been reintroduced by Knoll. George Nakashima's extraordinary blend of the organic, natural qualities of wood and clean modern design formed this Modernist interpretation of the traditional Windsor chair. Featuring natural, low-sheen finishes and live wood grain patterns, the Straight Chair epitomizes Nakashima and his craft. Based in Pennsylvania, Knoll has been an international leader in contemporary home and workplace furniture since 1939. Their motto is that Knoll is Modern Always, because modern always works, which reflects their commitment to pioneering vision and sustainability to help enhance and evolve the environment of contemporary life. Bringing a big name to modern elegance, Knoll offers a unique line of luxurious furniture from office chairs to outdoor dining tables that should not be missed. Photo Courtesy of Knoll

Knoll Splay-Leg Table

George Nakashima regarded cabinetry and woodwork as a noble art form – a view evidenced in the pieces he designed for Knoll. His Splay-Leg Coffee Table (1946) exhibits his gifted sense of grain, texture and balance. The veneered walnut or hickory top has a reverse slip-matched cathedral grain, which allows the table to be placed facing either way. Mortise and tenon joints and brass hardware secure the top to the angled solid walnut legs, creating a simple, heirloom-quality modern classic. Nakashima referred to himself as a “Japanese shaker,” expressing the belief that his designs should be treated as everyday functional objects, not precious possessions. The Shaker influence can be noted in his extraordinary skill at crafting wood, a material he approached with great reverence, saying, “A tree is our most intimate contact with nature.” A signature plate on the underside of the table attests to its authenticity. Manufactured by Knoll. Photo Courtesy of Knoll


Mel B's Modern West Hollywood Home Is on the Market For $5.9M

Permalink - Posted on 2019-03-15 20:35

Scary Spice's recently remodeled home is currently for sale.

The home at night. Note the high privacy hedges that rim the outdoor space.

Former Spice Girl Mel B first listed her modern residence in West Hollywood's exclusive Bird Streets neighborhood in 2017 for $8,999,00, however it dropped to $7,495,000 in 2018. Now, the home is back on the market at a slightly less scary price of $5,900,000.

The high-ceilinged living space is designed for comfortable entertaining and features light wood paneling, a marble-framed fireplace, and an elegant bar off to the side.

The high-ceilinged living space is designed for comfortable entertaining and features light wood paneling, a marble-framed fireplace, and an elegant bar off to the side.

Photos Courtesy of The Agency

Glass sliding doors lead to an outdoor terrace with sweeping city views.

Glass sliding doors lead to an outdoor terrace with sweeping city views.

Photos Courtesy of The AgencyL

Originally built in 1928, the home underwent a major renovation in 2016. Upgrades include a Control4 Smart Home system that controls sound, lighting, automatic shades, and fireplaces throughout the entire home—both indoors and out. 

Light wood flooring warms the interior. A Baccarat chandelier hanging over the dining table adds a bit of sparkling star quality.

Light wood flooring warms the interior. A Baccarat chandelier hanging over the dining table adds a bit of sparkling star quality.

Photos Courtesy of The Agency

The updated chef's kitchen is bright and designed with lots of storage space to help maintain its streamlined modern look.

The updated chef's kitchen is bright and designed with lots of storage space to help maintain its streamlined modern look.

Photos Courtesy of The Agency

The 5,226-square-foot, four-story home features 20-foot ceilings, spectacular city views, an elegant bar off the living room, and a lovely updated chef's kitchen. Star-worthy, Hollywood-esque elements include Baccarat fixtures, a home theater, a home gym, and even Mel B's very own home recording studio.

The master bedroom is equipped with two TVs, a marble-framed fireplace, a refrigerator, a microwave, and dual bathrooms—each with their own walk-in closet. Floor-to-ceiling glass doors lead to a private terrace with views of downtown Los Angeles.

The master bedroom is equipped with two TVs, a marble-framed fireplace, a refrigerator, a microwave, and dual bathrooms—each with their own walk-in closet. Floor-to-ceiling glass doors lead to a private terrace with views of downtown Los Angeles.

Photos Courtesy of The Agency

The view of downtown L.A. from the master bedroom.

The view of downtown L.A. from the master bedroom. 

Photos Courtesy of The Agency

The highlight of the master bathroom suite is the oval-shaped soaking tub with a skylight above. A sliding door leads out to a terrace.

The highlight of the master bathroom suite is the oval-shaped soaking tub with a skylight above. A sliding door leads out to a terrace.

Photos Courtesy of The Agency

The bathroom is covered in tiles, and the master shower is open. At the rear is a closet.

The bathroom is covered in tiles, and the master shower is open. At the rear is a closet.

Photos Courtesy of The Agency

Shop the Look

Victoria + Albert Ios Tub

The ios freestanding tub is known for its clean, modern lines, designed with both elegance and practicality in mind. The model is space-saving: it was originally designed to suit city apartments and en-suites where space is at a premium. Despite its compact sub 60” footprint, the contemporary ios is also generously deep with an impressive capacity that offers double ended bathing. The addition of the Tombolo 10 bath rack to the bathroom scheme will enhance the luxury feel, as adopted in many high-end locations around the world. Photo courtesy of Victoria + Albert

Sherwin Williams Paint - Extra White

Extra White is part of Sherwin-Williams' Reasoned collection. It is a true white that is clean, crisp, and fresh, and works well in contrast to an array of colors. Photo Courtesy of Sherwin-Williams

Binchotan Charcoal White Toothbrush

A modern update to a bathroom staple, this toothbrush features activated Binchotan charcoal that has been infused into every bristle. Charcoal's absorptive power helps to naturally deodorize your mouth and remove plaque while keeping the bristles clean between uses. It's a novel alternative to messy powdered charcoal toothpaste. This style features standard bristles for a deeper clean.

A view of the other master bathroom.

A view of the other master bathroom.

Photos Courtesy of The Agency

The home has a total of four bedrooms and six bathrooms.

The home has a total of four bedrooms and six bathrooms.

Photos Courtesy of The Agency

One of the other bedrooms.

One of the other bedrooms.

Photos Courtesy of The Agency

The screening room.

The screening room. 

Photos Courtesy of The Agency

The fully equipped home gym.

The fully equipped home gym. 

Photos Courtesy of The Agency

The recording studio.

Mel B's home recording studio. 

Photos Courtesy of The Agency

The family room leads out to the pool.

The family room leads out to the pool.

Photos Courtesy of The Agency

The pool and spa area features a fire pit, a built-in grill, beer on tap, an ice maker, and even an outdoor sink and fridge.

The pool and spa area features a fire pit, a built-in grill, beer on tap, an ice maker, and even an outdoor sink and fridge.

Photos Courtesy of The Agency

The home at night. Note the high privacy hedges that rim the outdoor space.

The home at night. Note the high privacy hedges that rim the outdoor space. 

Photos Courtesy of The Agency

9236 Cordell Drive West Hollywood is currently listed for $5,900,000 by Ben Belack and Blair Chang of The Agency.

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A Beautifully Bespoke Condo in Roman & Williams’ Coveted Nolita Building Lists For $7M

Permalink - Posted on 2019-03-15 19:45

Residence 2S is a modern mix of design-forward thinking, sophisticated materials, and old-world charm.

Full-height French doors lead to the second bedroom which is currently in use as a media room. The elegant built-in bookcase is from Amuneal’s Collector's Shelving system and was custom made in Philadelphia.

Located in 211 Elizabeth Street, an exclusive downtown Manhattan, 15-unit condominium designed by innovative New York City firm Roman & Williams—who also designed the interiors—Residence 2S is a two-bedroom, two-and-a-half bath home, with an expansive 1,120-square-foot landscaped terrace. The elegant home is full of character and showcases rich, high-end finishes, luxe materials, design-forward details, and quality craftsmanship throughout. 

The dramatic, flamed granite, wood-burning fireplace is the focal point of the living room which is divided into three distinct sitting areas.

The dramatic, flamed granite, wood-burning fireplace is the focal point of the living room which is divided into three distinct sitting areas. 

Photo by Joel Pitra of Donna Dotan Photography

The beautifully proportioned rooms feel open and flow like a contemporary version of a stately pre-war apartment. The living room is anchored by a dramatic, floor-to-ceiling, wood-burning fireplace that was custom-made for the unit from flamed granite. The bedrooms are set on either end of the living space with dramatic 9-foot-high French doors serving to divide the space.   

Rich walnut herringbone parquet floors are complemented by meticulous millwork.

Rich walnut herringbone parquet floors are complemented by meticulous millwork. 

Photo by Joel Pitra of Donna Dotan Photography

The baseboards, casings, windows, and doors are trimmed in Roman & Williams’ favorite high gloss black oil paint by Fine Paints of Europe.

The baseboards, casings, windows, and doors are trimmed in Roman & Williams’ favorite high gloss black oil paint by Fine Paints of Europe. 

Photo by Joel Pitra of Donna Dotan Photography

Full-height French doors lead to the second bedroom which is currently in use as a media room. The elegant built-in bookcase is from Amuneal’s Collector's Shelving system and was custom made in Philadelphia.

Full-height French doors lead to the second bedroom which is currently in use as a media room. The elegant built-in bookcase is from Amuneal’s Collector's Shelving system and was custom made in Philadelphia.

Photo by Joel Pitra of Donna Dotan Photography

The bright and airy master suite features wallpaper from Maharam-System.

The bright and airy master suite features wallpaper from Maharam-System.

Photo by Joel Pitra of Donna Dotan Photography

French doors lead to the bright and airy master suite where two walk-in closets and a large linen closet provide ample storage. The ensuite master bathroom enjoys rare dual exposures and features a glass-walled shower and a standalone deep soaking tub. Clad in rich materials such as Calacatta Gold marble slabs and brass fixtures the bright white space was designed to have, "the look and feel of a grand European hotel". On the other side of the unit, the second bedroom is currently being used as a media room and features custom built-ins and a walk-in closet. Recently renovated, the ensuite bathroom now boasts a Watermark steam shower with a bench and tiling from Heath Ceramics’ Dwell Collection.  

Roman & Williams designed the bathrooms with “the look and feel of a grand European hotel”. The double vanity is painted a high-glass cream and slabs of Calacatta marble is mixed with brass fixtures makes the master bath shine.

Roman & Williams designed the bathrooms with "the look and feel of a grand European hotel". The double vanity is painted a high-gloss cream and slabs of Calacatta marble is mixed with brass fixtures makes the master bath shine.

Photo by Joel Pitra of Donna Dotan Photography

The large, open kitchen is full of distinctive and moody Roman & Williams touches. There is an island set in the center of the space and tall cabinetry, all framed in walnut with fronts hand-painted with high-gloss black oil paint. The countertops are crafted from Danish oiled wood and perfectly paired with brass Watermark hardware. High-end appliances from Viking and Sub-Zero complete the space.

The kitchen opens to the dining area where floor-to-ceiling French doors lead to the terrace.

The customized kitchen opens to the dining area where floor-to-ceiling French doors lead out to the terrace.  

Photo by Joel Pitra of Donna Dotan Photography

The wall finish in the foyer leading to the terrace is custom-crafted plasterwork from Surface & Architecture and Workshop.

The wall finish in the foyer leading to the terrace is custom-crafted plasterwork from Surface & Architecture and Workshop.

Photo by Joel Pitra of Donna Dotan Photography

The ivy-covered terrace has three access points from inside the apartment.

The ivy-covered terrace has three access points from inside the apartment. 

Photo by Joel Pitra of Donna Dotan Photography

Another highlight of the unit is the expansive 1,120-square-foot landscaped terrace that features a gas fireplace, irrigation system, and two oversized pergolas veiled in ivy. Covered in elegantly-designed, red-brick, herringbone pavers, the private and elevated space perfect for outdoor dining and entertaining. 

An expansive outdoor terrace—especially one with a wood-burning fireplace is a rare find in a downtown Manhattan full-service building.

An expansive outdoor terrace—especially one with a wood-burning fireplace is a rare find in a downtown Manhattan full-service building. 

Photo by Rich Caplan


A Funnel-Shaped Cabin Soaks Up Light, Sea Breezes, and Forest Views

Permalink - Posted on 2019-03-15 19:43

Oriented towards the landscape, this modern home in Ecuador embraces stunning ocean and forest views.

The front and rear facades of Cabana Don Juan are made of glazed units framed in glass. The sides are made of fiber cement panels.

Located along the coast in Ecuador's Manabí Province, Cabana Don Juan looks out over the ocean and the forest. Architect Emilio Lopez situated the home at the top of a hill to best take advantage of views, and its east-west orientation and funnel-like shape facilitate cooling cross-breezes. 

The front and rear facades of Cabana Don Juan are made of glazed units framed in glass. The sides are made of fiber cement panels.

The front and rear facades of Cabana Don Juan are made of glazed units framed in glass. The sides are made of fiber cement panels.

Photo: JAG Studio

The funnel forms on either side of the building come together at the middle, where a lofted area for bedrooms is located.

The funnel forms on either side of the building come together at the middle, where a lofted area for bedrooms is located.

Photo by JAG Studio

At roughly 1,200 square feet, the home has as simple plan. Communal, public spaces are located on the ground floor, and two bedrooms lie on the second floor in a loft-like space.

The kitchen's open plan allows residents to look outside to the water while preparing a meal.

The kitchen's open plan allows residents to look outside to the water while preparing a meal.

Photo: JAG Studio

The rooms on the ground floor include a dining room, kitchen, full bath, and living room whose double-height ceiling stretches up to the second floor along the ocean-facing facade.

The staircase at the rear of the home climbs up along the glass facade, allowing for elevated views of the forest.

The staircase at the rear of the home climbs up along the glass facade, allowing for elevated views of the forest.

Photo: JAG Studio

At the rear of the residence, facing the deciduous forest, another double-height wall of windows provides continuous views as one ascends the staircase.

The floors, structure, window frames, and walls are all made of wood.

The floors, structure, window frames, and walls are all made of wood.

Photo: JAG Studio

The stairs and the entire structure of the home are made of locally sourced amarillo (Yellowheart) and asta wood. The exterior consists of glazed window walls at the front and rear, and fiber cement panels along the sides.

The east and west facades are covered in glass, while the north and south facades have tall punched windows; both emphasize height and verticality.

The east and west facades are covered in glass, while the north and south facades have tall punched windows; both emphasize height and verticality.

Photo: JAG Studio

The home’s furnishings lean toward simplicity, in large part because of the texture and warmth that comes from the walls lined in bamboo. The kitchen, for example, has wood cabinets, but the countertops are gray granite, continuing the neutral palette.

The home is simple in plan, but intriguing in form; its funnel shape not only emphasizes views and allows for cross-ventilation, but also helps shed water in inclement weather.

The home is simple in plan, but intriguing in form; its funnel shape not only emphasizes views and allows for cross-ventilation, but also helps shed water in inclement weather.

Photo: JAG Studio

Shop the Look

Nikari XL December Chair

Ash or oak with leather in Cognac or Nude H 15"/27.5" W 23.25" D 23.25" Made in Finland Ships in 6-10 weeks Bureau of Merchants covers shipping and import duties Nonreturnable Photo Courtesy of Bureau of Merchants

Wood Architecture Now! Vol. 2

As soon as our earliest ancestors first ventured out of their caves, they turned to wood for their protective structures. The ultimate renewable resource for architecture is also our oldest, rich with the evocation of bygone harmony between human beings and their environment. For some time pushed to the wayside by steel, concrete, and glass, wood has recently experienced an exciting revival. With the help of computer-driven design and manufacturing techniques, this inaugural construction material has been rediscovered and reimagined, crafted into geometric marvels; smooth shelters; and light, airy interiors. From Snøhetta's Norwegian Wild Reindeer Pavilion, with its CNC-milled timber wall, to beautiful modern homes in Japan, from urban centers to wild and unforgiving landscapes, see how this ancient building matter has come to construct some of the most innovative and contemporary buildings of today. Text in English, French, and German. Photo courtesy of TASCHEN Publisher: TASCHEN

Avocado Mattress Natural Wood Bed Frame

Made from 100% reclaimed wood, our Natural Wood Bed Frame is handmade to order in Los Angeles, finished in your choice of zero-VOC finishes. It assembles without tools. In-home delivery and setup is included.

The first floor is essentially an open plan—the bathroom is the only enclosed space. This allows for both cross-ventilation and views from one end of the home to the other, and to the horizon.

The first floor is essentially an open plan—the bathroom is the only enclosed space. This allows for both cross-ventilation and views from one end of the home to the other, and to the horizon.

Courtesy of Emilio Lopez

A section shows how Cabana Don Juan emphasizes the double-height spaces on either side of the home. The two bedrooms are located in the central lofted portion.

A section shows how Cabana Don Juan emphasizes the double-height spaces on either side of the home. The two bedrooms are located in the central lofted portion.

Courtesy of Emilio Lopez

Related Reading: Beach Breezes Blow Right Through This Ecuadorian House 

Project Credits:

Architect of Record: Emilio López 

Builder: Daniel Corti 

Structural Engineer: Patricio Cevallos 


RM-3 Episode Four: Logs Revisited

Permalink - Posted on 2019-03-15 18:46

We chat with the founder and CEO of Spinnova, a Finnish company turning wood pulp into cellulose fibers that can then be used in textiles, insulation, filling—even hygienic wipes.

To mark the March/April issue of Dwell Magazine and its focus on material innovation, we interview Janne Poranen, the cofounder and CEO of Spinnova, which processes wood pulp into textile fibers in the forests of Jyväskylä, Finland. The production uses zero harmful chemicals and produces zero waste—and the fibers can be reused without losing any quality. 

Tune in to hear how a talk on spider silk inspired Poranen and his business partner Juha Salmela—and how the concept of the adjacent possible works to stoke innovation across disciplines.

CEO Janne Poranen and his business partner, Juha Salmela,

CEO Janne Poranen and his business partner, Juha Salmela, were inspired by a talk on spider silk to create a patented nozzle that turns wood pulp and other biowaste into microfibers.

Courtesy of Spinnova

Products made of Spinnova fibers can be fed back into the pulping process to be turned back into reusable microfibrillated cellulose—without sacrificing quality.

Courtesy of Spinnova

Spinnova plans to dramatically scale up their operation in the coming years, eventually locating the spinning operations and the cellulose processing operations in the same facility.

Courtesy of Spinnova

Products made of Spinnova fibers can be fed back into the pulping process to be turned back into reusable microfibrillated cellulose—without sacrificing quality.

"Besides wood pulp, we are able to use some other raw materials, like agricultural waste—for example wheat, sugar beets, or potato peels," says Poranen.

Courtesy of Spinnova

Compared to cotton fibers, the production of wood-pulp fiber uses 99 percent less water

Compared to cotton fibers, the production of wood-pulp fiber uses 99 percent less water, and omits harmful chemicals.

Courtesy of Spinnova

RM-3 is produced by Jenny Xie, edited by Laura Spencer-Morris, and hosted by Dan Maginn. Our theme music is by Slag Ralden, with additional scoring by Hyps. Special thanks to Janne Poranen and Spinnova, to Stuart Kauffman for the concept of the adjacent possible, to Steven Johnson and Matt Ridley for connecting it to innovation, and to Ann Willoughby at TG&Y.


Winter Is Coming. Why Not Buy This Log Cabin–Style Villa in Finland?

Permalink - Posted on 2019-03-15 17:53

There’s room for you and everyone you know at this $4.3-million ski house, so consider going in on it with some friends.

True log cabins aren’t quite as large as this newly for-sale, 7,380-square-foot villa in Finland, but then again, the wood-frame cottages of yesteryear weren’t designed to house hordes of weekend guests and mountains of sports gear, either. Located near the Levi ski resort, in the endless forests of Lapland, the rustic lodge features walls built of hearty tree trunks, a branch-free wood-paneled ceiling, a little gazebo, and, of course, a sauna. Inspect the home’s voluminous yet surprisingly cozy interiors below, then decide if it’s worth the $4.3 million price tag here

The home is enveloped in arctic nature. The surrounding woodland is interrupted only by outdoor recreation areas for golfing and skiing.


The dramatic spiral staircase was handmade by a local artisan.



The home includes a traditional Finnish sauna clad in birch.



A traditional tapestry and other textile accents warm the home. The chandelier is by Kalmer.



The cathedral-like, wood-paneled ceiling is an impressive sight.


The home has five official bedrooms, and it can house extra guests in its living areas.
The home, which was completed in 2012, includes a gazebo and garage.


The Whale House

Permalink - Posted on 2019-03-15 17:40

This architecturally significant home designed by John Marsh Davis is located right on the beach. The home features a large open concept living/dining space with a custom dining table that has unparalleled ocean views. The compact kitchen is surrounded by glass windows that extend along the entire front of the house, making for views from every angle. The large wood burning fireplace is centered in the living room making a cozy place to curl up and watch the surf after a long day on the beach. On the ground floor is the only private bedroom. The second floor loft “bedrooms” are built-in berths that make one feel as if they were on a boat, each nook featuring stunning beach and ocean views. Each of the sleeping areas can be made private by lowering the custom sail-cloth blinds. There is also a third floor loft with two twin beds. This truly exceptional home boasts a large private inner courtyard, wrap around ocean front decks, and a hot tub overlooking the ocean.


Top 5 Homes of the Week With Exemplary Offices

Permalink - Posted on 2019-03-15 16:43

Working hard or hardly working? These sleek homes from the Dwell community get the job done with envy-inducing home offices.

ANACAPA Architecture designed Minimalist Urban Residence with California's temperate climate in mind. Radiant heat cement floors that extend into the study keep the home warm on cooler days.

Featured homes were submitted by members of the Dwell community through our Add a Home feature. Add your home to Dwell.com/homes today.

1. TOUCH '19 Home-Studio

TOUCH Architect's home, office, and studio space combines the best of all worlds. On the second floor, employees can hold meetings in conference rooms, lounge in the multi-use dining space, or cook in the kitchen.

TOUCH Architect's home, office, and studio space combines the best of all worlds. On the second floor, employees can hold meetings in conference rooms, lounge in the multi-use dining space, or cook in the kitchen.

Photo by Metipat Prommomate

Architect: TOUCH Architect, Location: Nonthaburi, Thailand

From the architect: "The three-story small home studio for [our] architectural firm has been divided into three parts: an office space, a private house, and a co-sharing space. An indoor office area on the first floor is a working space for all employees. On the second floor, there is a co-sharing space. There is a tiny office space for founders which can be connected to a center space by sliding the glass partition to open it. Sanctuary space is located at the top floor of this home-studio."

2. Tree House

The home office in Tree House by Deforest Architects offers a striking view of the surrounding trees.

The home office in Tree House by Deforest Architects offers a striking view of the surrounding trees.

Photo: Haris Kenjar

Architect: DeForest Architects, Location: Burien, Washington

From the architect: "Inspired by this hillside site and the owners’ childhood memories, we designed this family home to feel like a virtual walk in the woods."

3. Minimalist Urban Residence

ANACAPA Architecture designed Minimalist Urban Residence with California's temperate climate in mind. Radiant heat cement floors that extend into the study keep the home warm on cooler days.

ANACAPA Architecture designed Minimalist Urban Residence with California's temperate climate in mind. Radiant heat cement floors that extend into the study keep the home warm on cooler days.

Photo: ANACAPA

Architect: ANACAPA Architecture, Location: Santa Barbara, California

From the architect: "This private residence was designed for a young, creative entrepreneur. The structure maximizes natural light through an abundance of fixed and sliding glass, including skylights throughout the three-bedroom, two-bath home. A simple material palette of ipe and white stucco was selected for the exterior, while the interior is warmed with custom walnut cabinetry, Italian marble and brass fixtures."

4. House A326

The black studio wall in House A326 stands out against the rest of the home's palette of white and concrete. Almost all of the furnishings were custom-designed by Studio DiDea and realized by local artisans.

The black studio wall in House A326 stands out against the rest of the home's palette of white and concrete. Almost all of the furnishings were custom-designed by Studio DiDeA and realized by local artisans.

Photo by Serena Eller

Architect: Studio DiDeA, Location: Palermo, Italy

From the architecture firm's PR: "The owners, a couple, wanted an efficient home with generous storage spaces, and also a more contemporary look. The architects, following the clients' desires, renovated the apartment into a more airy, bright space with a better distribution."

5. Midcentury Style

“The first floor has a separate home office were we flipped the exterior color palette by painting the walls black and the windows white,” says Hawthorn Builders.

"The first floor has a separate home office were we flipped the exterior color palette by painting the walls black and the windows white," says Hawthorn Builders.

Photo by Michael J. Lee

Builder: Hawthorn Builders, Location: Needham, Massachusetts

From the builder: "This midcentury farm house has wonderful urban views out the back and considerable natural light. The first floor features an open-concept dining, kitchen, and family room with a spacious mudroom and dedicated home office. The home was constructed in a traditional wood frame building style, but incorporates all of the more modern conveniences."


Related Reading: 10 Essential Tips For Creating a Hardworking Home Office, 7 Effective Ways to Soundproof Your Home Office, Will Your Next Office Come on Wheels?

Want a chance to be featured? Add your home here!


One Family’s Norwegian Roots Inspire This Colorado Mountain Refuge

Permalink - Posted on 2019-03-14 21:47

Carefully nestled in the Colorado Rockies, Gammel Dam is an award-winning family hideaway whose serene, minimalist interiors recall Norwegian cabins.

Set on an east-west axis, the home stays cool with shading south-facing glass, minimal west-facing glass, and operable windows that allow for natural ventilation. Energy recovery ventilators also bring fresh air into the home.

When a couple approached Colorado–based Cottle Carr Yaw (CCY) Architects for a modern mountain retreat, they brought with them images of what would be the founding inspiration behind the new design—a simple and rugged cabin in Norway where the husband and his relatives had been gathering since the 1950s. Much like this ancestral Norwegian cabin, the new getaway is designed with the same rustic charms and deference to the landscape, as well as an inviting environment for friends and family to gather for generations to come.

Spread out over 4,942 square feet on an 11.76-acre gently sloping site, the Gammel Dam House includes five bedrooms, one bunk room, and three-and-a-half baths. The home can easily accommodate up to 14 people in the two-story guest wing that can be closed off when not in use.

Spread out over 4,942 square feet on an 11.76-acre gently sloping site, the Gammel Dam House includes five bedrooms, one bunk room, and three-and-a-half baths. The home can easily accommodate up to 14 people in the two-story guest wing that can be closed off when not in use.

Draper White Photography

"They specifically didn’t want large bedrooms for the guest wing to encourage their family and guests to congregate in the home’s public spaces," Todd Kennedy, principal architect at CCY, explains. He also adds that because the couple also planned to spend time in the retreat alone, the guest bedrooms, accessible via a bridge, can be closed off from the main living spaces when not in use so that the home could function as a one-bedroom cabin, comfortably scaled for two.

Set on an east-west axis, the home stays cool with shading south-facing glass, minimal west-facing glass, and operable windows that allow for natural ventilation. Energy recovery ventilators also bring fresh air into the home.

Set on an east-west axis, the home stays cool with shading south-facing glass, minimal west-facing glass, and operable windows that allow for natural ventilation. Energy recovery ventilators also bring fresh air into the home.

Draper White Photography

The angled roof mimics the sloped terrain and connects the cedar-lined sauna (on the right) to the main house and garage.

The angled roof mimics the sloped terrain and connects the cedar-lined sauna (on the right) to the main house and garage.

Draper White Photography

A connection to the outdoors was paramount to the design both in form—the low-lying building is topped with a roof angled to follow the sloped terrain—and accessibility. Large windows pull mountain views indoors while the house, carefully positioned to minimize site impact, feels immersed in its landscape of aspen groves, scrub oaks, sage, and spruce. The architects even worked closely with an arborist to ensure the long-term health of the mature spruce trees, and balanced all cut and fill on site.

"The engagement of the immediate site from every space was far more important to the client than how every room connected to the long range view," says Kennedy. "Where possible, we did both, but this directive allowed us to keep vegetation close to the house to nestle it into the landscape without worrying about how the vegetation may impact the long-range views."

"The engagement of the immediate site from every space was far more important to the client than how every room connected to the long range view," says Kennedy. "Where possible, we did both, but this directive allowed us to keep vegetation close to the house to nestle it into the landscape without worrying about how the vegetation may impact the long-range views."

Draper White Photography

The exterior is clad in pre-finished inland cedar and shou sugi ban-charred wood.

The exterior is clad in pre-finished inland cedar and shou sugi ban-charred wood.

Draper White Photography

"In addition to the spruce trees, the client wanted to preserve as much of the existing vegetation around the house to help the house appear as though it was set within its natural environment," Kennedy notes. "To achieve this, we worked with the general contractor to define very tight limits of construction just beyond the building’s footprint."

The exposed concrete floors, also equipped with radiant heating, help passively cool and heat the home in summer and winter, respectively. The bridge leading to the guest wing can be seen to the right of the mudroom.

The exposed concrete floors, also equipped with radiant heating, help passively cool and heat the home in summer and winter, respectively. The bridge leading to the guest wing can be seen to the right of the mudroom.

Draper White Photography

Shop the Look

Blu Dot Nonesuch Lounge Chair

The Nonesuch Lounge Chair from Blu Dot is a beautiful and straightforward seat that creates the ideal location in which to sit and relax. The seat is made of 3D bent plywood that possesses graceful contours that provide a stunning look from any angle. Minimally designed to complement a variety of motifs. The wood is veneered, which gives it a modern look. The legs, which are made of powder-coated steel, feature a minimalist style and unwavering strength that provides longevity. It is a pleasure to sit in, perfect for reading a book or magazine, talking with friends, or just unplugging from the stresses of contemporary life. Photo Courtesy of Blu Dot

Tom Dixon Eclectic Royalty Diffuser

Royalty is a reminiscence of tea time with a pot of Earl Grey, scones, strawberry jam and the drive home in a '52 Bentley with tatty leather seats. Encased in a nickel hand-spun vessel. Diffusers are in 200ml glass bottles with non-alcoholic based scent and seven black reeds. The scent will last 8-12 weeks, refill available. Scent Notes Top: Cologne, Bergamot and Lemon. Heart: Earl Grey Tea, Verbena and Mint. Base: Cedar Wood. Photo Courtesy of Tom Dixon

The Citizenry La Brisa Throw

A modern take on traditional Peruvian motifs, this hand-loomed 100% baby alpaca throw features an intricate diamond pattern with accent stripes. Rows of hand-twisted fringe lend a rustic touch to this clean, two tone textile. An everyday classic, it's remarkably lightweight and perfect for folding up in your bag or adding a touch of modern simplicity to your living space. Woven by hand in an ancient Andean mountain village, using only the finest baby alpaca fibers, each throw takes roughly a week to complete. All made exclusively in a fair trade environment. Note: Alpaca wool is hypoallergenic, so this throw is ideal for those with allergies or sensitive skin. Photo courtesy of The Citizenry

At the entry, a glimpse of the mudroom with the vertical-slat sliding door open.

At the entry, a glimpse of the mudroom with the vertical-slat sliding door open.

Draper White Photography

Careful consideration of the environment also carried over to the energy-efficient design of the house, oriented for optimal passive solar performance. Thanks to an airtight building envelope and triple-glazed windows, the interior requires no supplemental heat or cooling other than radiant heat.

A custom candle chandelier made of steel, bearing real candles, hangs above the dining table.

A custom candle chandelier made of steel, bearing real candles, hangs above the dining table.

Draper White Photography

Daylight, landscape views, and a predominantly timber-and-concrete palette define the modern interiors. White oak, in particular, is used in abundance to create a tranquil, monochromatic palette meant to lend a sense of intimacy to the interior.

The oversized kitchen window frames spectacular views of Snowmass. Matching the white oak palette are pale Caesarstone countertops.

The oversized kitchen window frames spectacular views of Snowmass. Matching the white oak palette are pale Caesarstone countertops.

Draper White Photography

"It allows the focus of the room to be the views rather than one’s focus being drawn to the interior architecture," Kennedy says. "We used two different grades of plain-sawn white oak. The minor differences in the grades of oak, in combination with how it was finished and the way we laid it up, created subtle amounts of contrast through the interior palette which helped create a level of sophistication within the home."

Built-in storage and blonde wood contributes to the home’s sleek and minimalist appearance.

Built-in storage and blonde wood contributes to the home’s sleek and minimalist appearance.

Draper White Photography

A peek inside the master bedroom that faces panoramic mountain views.

A peek inside the master bedroom that faces panoramic mountain views.

Draper White Photography

A Victoria + Albert Barcelona tub overlooks stunning landscape views.

A Victoria + Albert Barcelona tub overlooks stunning landscape views.

Draper White Photography

Sentimental reminders of the husband’s Norwegian childhood also decorate the space, from the framed wildflowers he pressed as a child to the stacked walls of chopped wood and collections of hatches and axes.

"Norwegian blood," says Kennedy, "instills in him the need to chop wood and a love for wood-burning fireplaces." 

The massive wood-burning hearth is built of Mountain Ash granite with a shou sugi ban accent above.

The massive wood-burning hearth is built of Mountain Ash granite with a shou sugi ban accent above.

Draper White Photography

Custom sliding doors extend the living areas to the outdoors.

Custom sliding doors extend the living areas to the outdoors.

Draper White Photography

Poured concrete stairs step down alongside built-in storage.

Poured concrete stairs step down alongside built-in storage.

Draper White Photography

Uphill is a freestanding tool "shed" with a cozy office that serves as a quiet getaway when there are too many guests at home. The south wall of the building serves as wood storage.

Uphill is a freestanding tool "shed" with a cozy office that serves as a quiet getaway when there are too many guests at home. The south wall of the building serves as wood storage.

Draper White Photography

Related Reading: A Norwegian Summer Cabin Embraces the Rocky Terrain

Project Credits:

Architect of Record: CCY Architects / @ccyarchitects

Builder/ General Contractor: Key Elements Construction

Structural Engineer: KL&A

Civil Engineer: Boundaries Unlimited

Landscape Design Company: Mt. Daly Enterprises

Lighting Design: LS Group

Fixed Finishes/Cabinetry Design: CCY Architects

Cabinetry Manufacturing:  Whalen Custom Cabinets

Photography: Draper White Photography


Switzerland’s Quirky Cat Ladders Help Wandering Felines Ascend New Heights

Permalink - Posted on 2019-03-14 20:53

Brigitte Schuster captures Switzerland’s charming cat architecture trend in her upcoming book Swiss Cat Ladders.

Ramps set at different angles gives this cat ladder contraption a playful feel. Small railings help prevent cats from falling.

In Switzerland, devout cat owners are showering love on their feline companions with a charming house modification—the cat ladder.

Two cat ladders on different roofs give the cat access to the building's highest room.

Two cat ladders on different roofs give the cat access to the building's highest room.

Brigitte Schuster

Designed to help cats move around more easily without resorting to acrobatic jumps, these strategically placed ramps and ladders have caught on—and residents have developed a wide variety of styles to match the aesthetics of different buildings.

This wooden cat ladder complements the grapevines that grow along the building facade.

This wooden cat ladder complements the grapevines that grow along the building facade.

Brigitte Schuster

For Bern–based writer and photographer Brigitte Schuster, these architectural oddities also presented an interesting research project. "A closer look at the cat ladders reveals sociological, architectural, and aesthetic perspectives," Schuster says.

On the lower right is a fairly simple cat ramp mounted to a wooden pole. The climbing structure on the left integrates a zigzagging chicken ladder.

On the lower right is a fairly simple cat ramp mounted to a wooden pole. The climbing structure on the left integrates a zigzagging chicken ladder.

Brigitte Schuster

Ramps set at different angles gives this cat ladder contraption a playful feel. Small railings help prevent cats from falling.

Ramps set at different angles gives this cat ladder contraption a playful feel. Small railings help prevent cats from falling.

Brigitte Schuster

The rise of cat ladders in Switzerland is perhaps of little surprise. Cats are the most popular household pets in the nation, and Bern is full of cat lovers, notes Schuster.

This cat ladder, which ascends to the third floor, is one of the highest of its kind that Schuster has seen in Bern.

This cat ladder, which ascends to the third floor, is one of the highest of its kind that Schuster has seen in Bern.

Brigitte Schuster

This sleek spiral staircase was special-ordered from the internet.

This sleek spiral staircase was special-ordered from the internet.

Brigitte Schuster

While the thought of burglars using the outdoor structures may deter other cities from hopping on the cat ladder bandwagon, the Swiss seem to be less concerned, perhaps because of their country’s relatively low crime rates. (The cat climbing aids would also not likely be strong enough to hold a person's weight.)

Treads attached to this rain pipe lead to the second floor.

Treads attached to this rain pipe lead to the second floor.

Brigitte Schuster

Having photographed the many cat ladders throughout Bern, Schuster has compiled her findings and photographs into an upcoming book, Swiss Cat Ladders.

A simple cat ladder with treads leads from the mail boxes to the top of the door sill.

A simple cat ladder with treads leads from the mail boxes to the top of the door sill.

Brigitte Schuster

The book, which is bilingual in English and German, showcases the creativity and eccentricity of the climbing structures—ranging from sleek spiral staircases to foldable zigzagging contraptions—and even explores the necessity of the cat ladder as well as the phenomena’s underlying cultural meanings in essays, diagrams, and full-page photographs.

This cat ladder culminates in a shelter for the cat.

This cat ladder culminates in a shelter for the cat.

Brigitte Schuster

Schuster's book Swiss Cat Ladders will be printed in the fall of 2019, and it's currently available for pre-order on her website.

A cat ladder zigzags up the side of a building. Landings provide space for the cat to turn around.

A cat ladder zigzags up the side of a building. Landings provide space for the cat to turn around.

Brigitte Schuster

Here, the cat ramp spans the gap between the tree and the balcony.

Here, the cat ramp spans the gap between the tree and the balcony.

Brigitte Schuster

Developed by German designer Maike Franzen, this foldable cat ladder is constructed from plastic.

Developed by German designer Maike Franzen, this foldable cat ladder is constructed from plastic.

Brigitte Schuster


10 West Coast Wineries With Architecture as Noteworthy as the Wines They Produce

Permalink - Posted on 2017-10-03 16:39

These modern wineries offer a full-bodied experience.

The indoor/outdoor structure embraces the wine-making process and provides a strong sense of space. The exterior wood is repurposed 100-year-old wine tanks.

A weekend away at a vineyard doesn't have to be just about the wine tasting—rather, it should be an opportunity to escape to a beautiful destination complete with impressive modern architecture. So, whether you're a fan of a full-bodied pinot noir, a zesty chardonnay, or just great design, these modern wineries on the West Coast will soon be on your "go-to" list. 

Ashes & Diamonds

Location: Napa, California

Architecture: Barbara Bestor

Inspired by the iconic, modern architecture of Albert Frey and Donald Wexler, Ashes & Diamonds winery is a bright, white, geometric display that marks the cinematic valley landscape of rolling hills and vineyard rows. The winery consists of two rectangular buildings: A two-level wine production facility with an industrial aesthetic and large portholes that reference works by Frey, and a smaller, single-level, stucco-clad tasting room topped with a folded-plate, pavilion-style canopy that mirrors the valley hills and mitigates sunlight.

The tasting room is shaded by a folded-plate canopy that recalls the modernist designs of architect Donald Wexler.

The tasting room is shaded by a folded-plate canopy that recalls the modernist designs of architect Donald Wexler.

Photo: Bruce Damonte

The interior of the tasting room is outfitted with Eero Saarinen-designed chairs, North African rugs, Douglas fir siding, and a terrazzo floor.

The interior of the tasting room is outfitted with Eero Saarinen-designed chairs, North African rugs, Douglas fir siding, and a terrazzo floor.

Photo: Bruce Damonte

An aerial view of the Ashes & Diamonds winery and tasting room.

An aerial view of the Ashes & Diamonds winery and tasting room.

Photo: Bruce Damonte

L'Angolo Estate

Location: Newberg, Oregon

Architecture: Lever Architecture

Located 45 minutes from Portland on a picturesque 23 acres, L'Angolo Estate is a family-owned winery that was designed by Portland-based Lever Architecture and completed in 2016. The firm tackled their first winery by creating a sleek and modern tasting room experience that embodies the family’s minimalist approach to winemaking.

Set at the top of the vineyard, the tasting room opens up to the valley with a structural glazing system that provides guests with stunning panoramic views.

Set at the top of the vineyard, the tasting room opens up to the valley with a structural glazing system that provides guests with stunning panoramic views.

Photo by Jeremy Bittermann

The design takes cues from the vernacular architecture of the Willamette Valley.

The design takes cues from the vernacular architecture of the Willamette Valley.

Photo: Jeremy Bittermann

Inspired by the canopied, native oak trees that populate the valley, two cantilevered roof structures interlock at the tasting room's entryway. The material palette is limited to Douglas fir, cedar siding, and dark anodized aluminum.

Inspired by the canopied, native oak trees that populate the valley, two cantilevered roof structures interlock at the tasting room's entryway. The material palette is limited to Douglas fir, cedar siding, and dark anodized aluminum.

Photo: Jeremy Bittermann

Two large sliding doors centered with the tasting room bar bring the vineyard into the space, while also serving as a passive cooling system in the summer when used in tandem with the upper clerestory windows.

Two large sliding doors centered with the tasting room bar bring the vineyard into the space, while also serving as a passive cooling system in the summer when used in tandem with the upper clerestory windows. 

Photo: Jeremy Bittermann

Silver Oak 

Location: Oakville, California

Architecture: Piechota Architecture

San Francisco–based firm Piechota Architecture created a net-positive water tasting room and production facility for the small, family-owned Silver Oak winery in Alexander Valley. Water—which plays a key role in wine production—also figures prominently in the design, with a large, rectangular reflecting pool that cuts its way through the black, barn-like tasting room. Clad in wood siding repurposed from 100-year-old wine tanks from Cherokee Winery (and salvaged by Robert Mondavi, a Napa Valley pioneer winery), the wood-and-steel material palette of the wine cellar references the construction of a wine barrel.

The barn-like forms make a stark, simple silhouette against the landscape. Rooftop solar panels helped the project earn LEED platinum certification.

The barn-like forms make a stark, simple silhouette against the landscape. Rooftop solar panels helped the project earn LEED platinum certification.

Photo: Joe Fletcher

The mix of wood and steel references the construction of a wine barrel. A long rectangular reflecting pool runs the length of the tasting room.

The mix of wood and steel references the construction of a wine barrel. A long rectangular reflecting pool runs the length of the tasting room.

Photo: Joe Fletcher

The indoor/outdoor structure embraces the wine-making process and provides a strong sense of space. The exterior wood is repurposed 100-year-old wine tanks.

The indoor/outdoor structure embraces the wine-making process and provides a strong sense of space. The exterior wood is repurposed 100-year-old wine tanks.

Photo: Joe Fletcher

Furioso Vineyards

Location: Dundee, Oregon

Architecture: Waechter Architecture

To create Furioso Vineyards, Portland–based Waechter Architecture renovated and expanded a pre-existing winery and added a new tasting room with additional public amenities. Located in the heart of Oregon’s wine country, the original Furioso estate was made up of "a series of disconnected utilitarian structures scattered across its property," including a steel-shed winery, various storage facilities, an outdoor crush pad, and an adjacent residence—all of which lacked an overall identity. Waechter sought to unify the vineyard and refocus buildings to heighten vistors' experience of the surrounding landscape and the wine-making process.

The new tasting room is positioned to feel as if it is hovering above and within the vineyard. Open on all sides, it offers panoramic views of the surrounding hills.

The new tasting room is positioned to feel as if it is hovering above and within the vineyard. Open on all sides, it offers panoramic views of the surrounding hills.

Waechter Architecture

Waechter Architecture expanded and re-clad the existing winery with a vertical 2" x 2" blackened cedar screen. During the day, the body of the building takes on a solid appearance. At night, the screen takes on an ethereal, translucent character as interior illumination backlights the vertical cedar ribs.

Waechter Architecture expanded and re-clad the existing winery with a vertical 2" x 2" blackened cedar screen. During the day, the body of the building takes on a solid appearance. At night, the screen takes on an ethereal, translucent character as interior illumination backlights the vertical cedar ribs. 

Waechter Architecture

Sokol Blosser

Location: Dundee Hills, Oregon

Architecture: Allied Works

The Sokol Blosser family, one of the founders of Oregon’s wine-making industry, has been producing pinot noir, pinot gris, and other varietals since 1978. When the winery commissioned Allied Works to design a new tasting room and event space for the 100-acre estate, they devised a structure composed of three interconnected volumes to showcase the surrounding landscape and spectacular views of the Yamhill Valley. The new tasting room incorporates a number of green features and is the first winery in the U.S. designed to comply with the key components of the Living Building Challenge.

The building is unified by striated wood cladding that presents a new, organic architectural form inspired by the vineyard's rows and the region's vernacular wood agricultural buildings.

The building is unified by striated wood cladding that presents a new, organic architectural form inspired by the vineyard's rows and the region's vernacular wood agricultural buildings.

Photo: Jeremy Bittermann

A main tasting room occupies the center of the new building and includes a bar, outdoor terrace, seating area, and hearth. A library and kitchen flank the tasting room and offer a range of spaces for gathering and wine tasting.

A main tasting room occupies the center of the new building and includes a bar, outdoor terrace, seating area, and hearth. A library and kitchen flank the tasting room and offer a range of spaces for gathering and wine tasting.

Photo: Jeremy Bittermann

Quintessa

Location: Rutherford California

Architecture: Walker Warner Architects

Located in Napa Valley, Quintessa, a family-run vineyard, turned to Walker Warner Architects to create modern wine tasting pavilions that blend in with the bucolic California landscape. They wanted the structures to offer protection from the sun, wind, and heat without disturbing the land or coming between the visitor and the vineyard. Walker Warner Architects' response was a series of three 250-square-foot open-air structures, set amongst the oak trees overlooking the vineyard-covered hills and the lake beyond.

Quintessa Winery has a commitment to creating modern architecture that complements rather than competes with the landscape.

Quintessa Winery has a commitment to creating modern architecture that complements rather than competes with the landscape. 

Photo: Matthew Williams

Carefully selected materials make the building appear as if it grew from the land. Environmentally sensitive finishes echo the existing winery, which the firm designed in 2002.

Carefully selected materials make the building appear as if it grew from the land. Environmentally sensitive finishes echo the existing winery, which the firm designed in 2002. 

Photo: Matthew Williams

But onto the real question: The pavilion is a definite delight to the eyes, but does it make the wine more tasty? “Absolutely!” Warner and McCabe assert. “Each pavilion is elegantly unobtrusive and offers a rustic yet refined experience evocative of picnicking with a bottle of wine under an oak tree. In this way, the pavilions serve to bring the visitor a greater depth of understanding and appreciation for the place where Quintessa is made and the process that creates its uniquely sophisticated character.”

But onto the real question: The pavilion is a definite delight to the eyes, but does it make the wine more tasty? "Absolutely!" Warner and McCabe assert. "Each pavilion is elegantly unobtrusive and offers a rustic yet refined experience evocative of picnicking with a bottle of wine under an oak tree. In this way, the pavilions serve to bring the visitor a greater depth of understanding and appreciation for the place where Quintessa is made and the process that creates its uniquely sophisticated character."

Photo: Matthew Williams

Law Estate Wines

Location: Paso Robles, California

Architecture: BAR Architects

Situated on a 55-acre site with full panoramic views of the breathtaking countryside, Law Estates Wines' architecture reflects the wine-making characteristics that distinguish them from other producers in the Paso Robles region. Much like their focus on showcasing the natural characteristics of each varietal and the specific territory in which they were grown, the minimalist building responds directly to the natural materials of the site, its hillside topography, and the climatic influences of the sun and wind. 

The design is contextually modern and expressive of the various functions contained within the winery.

The design is contextually modern and expressive of the various functions contained within the winery.

BAR Architects

BAR Architects designed the winery using Scott Hawley’s wine-making concepts and a clean and contemporary aesthetic.

BAR Architects designed the winery using Scott Hawley’s wine-making concepts and a clean and contemporary aesthetic.

BAR Architects

The design is focused on unobstructed views of the estate's vineyard, along with a simple process flow for its handcrafted approach to wine making.

The design is focused on unobstructed views of the estate's vineyard, along with a simple process flow for its handcrafted approach to wine making.

BAR Architects

BRAND

Location: Napa Valley, California

Architecture: Signum Architecture

Designed by Juancarlos Fernandez of Signum Architecture, the tasting room for the BRAND winery creates a striking silhouette. Simple and unadorned, the corrugated-metal building is set atop tall concrete foundation walls, with a welcoming, wrap-around porch to shelter guests from the hot summer sun and winter rains that are characteristic of California's Napa Valley. Inside, exposed wood beams soften and warm the space, creating a lodge-like atmosphere.

Eschewing the typical white barn vernacular commonly found throughout Napa Valley, Fernandez turned to the rustic architectural traditions of western mining communities for inspiration.

Eschewing the typical white barn vernacular commonly found throughout Napa Valley, Fernandez turned to the rustic architectural traditions of western mining communities for inspiration.

Adrián Gregorutti

Steep roofs and tall internal spaces provide barnlike simplicity and facilitate an efficient multilevel design.

Steep roofs and tall internal spaces evoke a barn-like simplicity and facilitate an efficient, multi-level design.

Adrián Gregorutti

A wrap-around porch shelters visitors from the hot summer sun and protects from the winter rains that are characteristic of Napa Valley.

A wrap-around porch shelters visitors from the hot summer sun and protects from the winter rains that are characteristic of Napa Valley.

Adrián Gregorutti

Dominus Estate

Location: Napa Valley, California

Architecture: Herzog + De Meuron

Private and difficult to visit, Dominus Estate has also been dubbed "the stealth winery," as the structure is barely discernible from the foothills and vineyards. Completed in 1997, Dominus Estate was the first U.S. project designed by the Swiss architecture firm Herzog + De Meuron. The structure draws more inspiration from Miesian modernism and brutalist influences than traditional winery architecture.

Herzog + de Meuron used a variety of industrial materials throughout Dominus Estate. After ascending the stairwell to the second level, one is met by brutalist, concrete floors, a wire-mesh ceiling, floor-to-ceiling glass, and sunlight that shines through the gabions. A varnished-wood handrail contrasts with the metal, stone, and glass, adding warmth to the otherwise cool setting.

Herzog + de Meuron used a variety of industrial materials throughout Dominus Estate. After ascending the stairwell to the second level, one is met by brutalist, concrete floors, a wire-mesh ceiling, floor-to-ceiling glass, and sunlight that shines through the gabions. A varnished-wood handrail contrasts with the metal, stone, and glass, adding warmth to the otherwise cool setting.

Herzog + de Meuron

Upon entering the winery, visitors are met with a minimalist hall and an unobstructed route through the structure.

Upon entering the winery, visitors are met with a minimalist hall and an unobstructed route through the structure.

Herzog + de Meuron

Martin's Lane

Location: Okanagan Valley, British Columbia, Canada

Architecture: Olson Kundig

Proprietor Anthony von Mandl's latest project is a newly opened winery in British Columbia. Tucked into a steep hillside in the Okanagan Valley—which has the lowest rainfall of any wine-producing region in the world—the architecturally stunning Martin’s Lane was designed by Seattle-based Olson Kundig and boasts a dramatic structure made of glass, steel, and concrete.

The dramatic structure fits seamlessly into the stunning landscape.

The dramatic structure fits seamlessly into the stunning landscape. 

Martin's Lane

The winery is a testament to proprietor Anthony von Mandl’s commitment to the local Okanagan region.

The winery is a testament to proprietor Anthony von Mandl’s commitment to the local Okanagan region.

Martin's Lane

Martin’s Lane is a "gravity flow" winery designed on different levels to allow wine to flow—rather than be pumped—from one stage of the production process to the next, extracting color, flavor, and tannin from the grape skins.

Martin’s Lane is a "gravity flow" winery designed on different levels to allow wine to flow—rather than be pumped—from one stage of the production process to the next, extracting color, flavor, and tannin from the grape skins. 

Martin's Lane


A Historic Melbourne Home Sports an Angular Addition and a Batten Screen

Permalink - Posted on 2019-03-14 18:18

WALA renovates and expands a heritage listed home with a second-floor addition that presents a graphic, batten-screen facade.

Sited on a "pizza-shaped" lot in Albert Park area of Melbourne, a Victorian home was in need of a major renovation for a family of four. Charged with removing inefficient, ad hoc additions at the rear and adding on an architecturally distinct, light-filled space for the family, Melbourne–based architecture firm WALA created a volume covered on the exterior with a "wall of light" made out of translucent polycarbonate.

At night, the battens on the facade glow, further emphasizing the triangular shapes inspired by the gabled roofs of the home and its neighbors.

At night, the battens on the facade glow, further emphasizing the triangular shapes inspired by the gabled roofs of the home and its neighbors.

©Tatjana Plitt

Inspired by the slopes and angles of the existing home’s gabled roof and those of the Victorian homes in the area, the design team created a faceted, angular facade of vertical battens for the new extension.

Inspired by the slopes and angles of the existing home’s gabled roof and those of the Victorian homes in the area, the design team created a faceted, angular facade of vertical battens for the new extension.

©Tatjana Plitt

WALA started with rethinking the traditional placement of bedrooms on the second floor, instead locating them on the first floor in the rear addition. This decision allowed the bedrooms to take advantage of the privacy and security of a new street wall while opening up the living room on the second floor to receive better views and daylight. 

As an addition to a listed home in Melbourne, the local preservation regulations required the alteration be distinct from the historic home. This was done through both form and materiality.

As an addition to a listed home in Melbourne, the local preservation regulations required the alteration be distinct from the historic home. This was done through both form and materiality.

©Tatjana Plitt

On the exterior, local preservation laws required the new addition to be visually distinct from the historic facade, and WALA sought to connect the two through form and color. Inspired by the slopes and angles of the existing home’s gabled roof and those of the Victorian homes in the area, the design team created a faceted, angular facade of vertical battens for the new extension.

The battens not only have strong graphic sensibility, but also create privacy and views into neighboring gardens, while a full-height polycarbonate wall along living spaces on the upper floor allows for lots of daylight and provides a fresh alternative to traditional punched windows.

The bedroom on the first floor has access to a private back porch, separated from the street with the street wall—but open enough that it can take advantage of lots of light.

The bedroom on the first floor has access to a private back porch, separated from the street with the street wall—but open enough that it can take advantage of lots of light.

©Tatjana Plitt

WALA also considered color and material palette, looking to shades of white and translucency to tie both parts of the home together. To break up the neutral tones, texture became critical, with the regular machined finish of aluminum-extruded battens contrasting with the aged texture of the existing building’s weatherboard cladding.

In the dining area, Billiani Design 'Blue' dining chairs from Hub Furniture are a bold but warm shade of blue that provides a welcome moment of contrast from the white walls and dining table.

In the dining area, Billiani Design 'Blue' dining chairs from Hub Furniture are a bold but warm shade of blue that provides a welcome moment of contrast from the white walls and dining table. 

©Tatjana Plitt

On the interior of the home, light pours in on the second floor from the spaces between the battens, and are emphasized with mostly white interiors with moments of color like a sculptural pink sofa, blue dining chairs, or a sliding yellow door. 

A large sliding door closes off a small home office, which takes advantage of its irregular shape by placing windows and plants near the corner.

A large sliding door closes off a small home office, which takes advantage of its irregular shape by placing windows and plants near the corner.

©Tatjana Plitt

On the first floor, a bedroom with neutral colors opens up to a private garden, with protection overhead from a cantilevered second floor. 

A small terrace on the second floor is partially enclosed with battens and polycarbonate for privacy, but the spacing of the battens and the translucency of the polycarbonate still allow for light and views of the city beyond.

A small terrace on the second floor is partially enclosed with battens and polycarbonate for privacy, but the spacing of the battens and the translucency of the polycarbonate still allow for light and views of the city beyond.

©Tatjana Plitt

At street level, the architects were able to introduce a shared garden at the because of the irregularly shaped site. The garden is made possible by angling the home’s street wall back away from the sidewalk, creating a small green space. The garden promotes engagement with the street and passersby, ultimately making the intervention a way of thoughtfully integrating into the neighborhood. 

The street wall, new addition, and existing building are all united in their color palette of shades of white, but are distinct in their materials, shape, and joint patterns. The street wall and existing building have a horizontal emphasis, while the second floor's addition has a vertical one.

The street wall, new addition, and existing building are all united in their color palette of shades of white, but are distinct in their materials, shape, and joint patterns. The street wall and existing building have a horizontal emphasis, while the second floor's addition has a vertical one.

©Tatjana Plitt

Related Reading: This Australian Abode Is a Glass Pavilion Wrapped in Sliding Hardwood Screens

Project Credits:

Architect of Record: WALA / @wala.studio 

Builder: Daylan Developments

Structural Engineer: R.I. Brown 

Civil Engineer: R.I. Brown

Landscape Design Company: Australian Vertical Garden Group

Lighting Supplier: Beacon Lighting

Interior Stylist: Rowena Moore

Cabinetry Design: LV Kitchens

Window Supplier: Uptons Windows

Photographer: Tatjana Plitt / @tatjanaplitt


A Revamped Cottage With a Detached Entertainment “Cube” Asks $2.8M in San Diego

Permalink - Posted on 2019-03-14 17:01

Renovated to foster indoor/outdoor living, the charming La Jolla home was featured in a Dwell home tour in 2016.

The multifunctional backyard unit boasts sound-insulated walls, making it ideal for movie nights.

Built in the 1940s as a fisherman’s cottage in La Jolla, the residence at 5681 Dolphin Place received a makeover from Architects Magnus. "Because indoor/outdoor living is an integral part of San Diego living, large glass sliding doors completely open the house to the private patio that was hidden in the prior plan layout," says the firm. 

Now, the rear of the 1,360-square-foot home seamlessly joins its backyard, and a 400-square-foot, detached entertainment "cube" with a rooftop deck offers even more opportunities to lounge under the sun.

During the renovation, the home’s older siding was swapped out for a rainscreen installation to improve moisture control.

During the renovation, the home’s older siding was swapped out for a rainscreen installation to improve moisture control.

Courtesy of Rachael Kaiser and Compass

Inside, every aspect of the open-plan living area, from the couch to the dining table to the kitchen island, can appreciate sight lines to the backyard.  

The porcelain plank flooring is continuous throughout, with zero-step thresholds at doors and showers.

The porcelain plank flooring is continuous throughout, with zero-step thresholds at doors and showers.

Courtesy of Rachael Kaiser and Compass

Kitchen appliances include a SMEG refrigerator, Bertazzoni Range Oven, and Bosch Dishwasher. The counters are honed white quartz, and the pendant over the island is the Cirrus Float by Edge Lighting.

Kitchen appliances include a SMEG refrigerator, Bertazzoni Range Oven, and Bosch Dishwasher. The counters are honed white quartz, and the pendant over the island is the Cirrus Float by Edge Lighting.

Courtesy of Rachael Kaiser and Compass

Floor-to-ceiling sliding glass doors from panorama! encourage light and air into the interiors.

Floor-to-ceiling sliding glass doors from panorama! encourage light and air into the interiors.

Courtesy of Rachael Kaiser and Compass

Storage abounds in the main floor master bedroom.

Storage abounds in the main floor master bedroom.

Courtesy of Rachael Kaiser and Compass

The property features two bedrooms, three full baths, and bountiful access to the outdoors.

The property features two bedrooms, three full baths, and bountiful access to the outdoors.

Courtesy of Rachael Kaiser and Compass

The distinctive tile pattern in a bathroom echoes the pattern treatment on the base of the kitchen island.

The distinctive tile pattern in a bathroom echoes the pattern treatment on the base of the kitchen island.

Courtesy of Rachael Kaiser and Compass

The architects dubbed the detached backyard unit the "cube." A staircase with floating tread leads up to a rooftop deck.

The architects dubbed the detached backyard unit the "cube." A staircase with floating tread leads up to a rooftop deck.

Courtesy of Rachael Kaiser and Compass

The multifunctional backyard unit boasts sound-insulated walls, making it ideal for movie nights.

The multifunctional backyard unit boasts sound-insulated walls, making it ideal for movie nights.

Courtesy of Rachael Kaiser and Compass

Shop the Look

EQ3 Posey Vase

Add color to your space with these playful ceramic vases Photo courtesy of EQ3

Pfeifer Studio La Cueva Hand Painted Cube Table

Each La Cueva table is a unique artwork. The cubes—perfect for a nightstand or side table—are hewn from Ponderosa pine wood and handpainted by New Mexico artists in abstract, modern shapes and bold colors by Benjamin Moore.

Design House Stockholm Yellow Knot Pillow

“I’ve always been attracted to strange and unique things,” says Ragnheiður Ösp Sigurðardóttir as she explains how she developed her Knot Pillow (2011). “I try to create unusual designs, products that are unpredictable and that make people curious.” This piece started as an experiment with tubular knitting and ended with a knotlike pillow. Made in Lithuania. Photo Courtesy of Design Within Reach

An outdoor shower is surrounded in teak.

An outdoor shower is surrounded in teak.

Courtesy of Rachael Kaiser and Compass

A Schweiss hydraulic aircraft-hangar door connects the cube to the yard.

A Schweiss hydraulic aircraft-hangar door connects the cube to the yard.

Courtesy of Rachael Kaiser and Compass

The rooftop deck has beautiful views of the water.

The rooftop deck has beautiful views of the water.

Courtesy of Rachael Kaiser and Compass

The home is located in the desirable Bird Rock neighborhood of La Jolla.

The home is located in the desirable Bird Rock neighborhood of La Jolla.

Courtesy of Rachael Kaiser and Compass

5681 Dolphin Place is listed for $2,750,000 by Rachael Kaiser of Compass.

Know of a home for sale or rent that should be featured on Dwell.com? Find out how to submit to Dwell.


How Neutra’s Kaufmann House Got its Groove Back

Permalink - Posted on 2019-03-13 21:51

Marmol Radziner and homeowner Brent Harris shed light on the exhaustive, five-year process of unearthing the plans for Richard Neutra’s iconic Kaufmann House in Palm Springs—and the meticulous work it took to recreate its design.

After much research, the original buff stone pictured was discovered at a quarry in Utah, which had since closed but reopened for the material sourcing for this project, the restoration of Richard Neutra's Kaufmann House. A mason worked there for a year and a half to accurately restore stone, chiseling and cutting blocks precisely in place to create a pleasing mosaic. Tops and bottoms of the stones were cut smooth to sit in horizontal position, allowing the sides and faces to be more organic as Richard Neutra intended.

It would begin with one full year of research. Every day, for four of those months, the architectural restoration team donned gloves and combed through the archives at the UCLA Research Library to solve the puzzle of Richard Neutra’s famed Kauffman House, completed in 1946 and since fallen into disrepair. Floors were cracked, casework had been removed, portions of the land had been sold, and the square footage had nearly doubled through additions over the years. 

Sans original plans, they visited the archives daily, redrawing everything original they could capture by hand as part of an intensive, five-year restoration project taken on by the new homeowners. "There are truly iconic, important pieces of architecture, and this is one of those," says Ron Radziner, design partner at Marmol Radziner. "This is one of the 20 best homes in this country, and it deserved that level of restoration." 

Vienna–born architect Richard Neutra designed the Kaufmann House in Palm Springs in 1947 for Edgar Kaufmann, Sr., the Jewish owner of a trendsetting Pittsburgh department store. Jewish architectural photographer Julius Schulman captured the striking home in this image.

Vienna–born architect Richard Neutra designed the Kaufmann House in Palm Springs in 1947 for Edgar Kaufmann, Sr., the Jewish owner of a trendsetting Pittsburgh department store. Jewish architectural photographer Julius Schulman captured the striking home in this image.

Courtesy J. Paul Getty Trust.

The year was 1993, and the internet was not what it is today, but they kept on. In addition to the work at UCLA, research also included time spent on-site, unearthing years of additions and modifications to the home in search of any clues they could find, such as the original mica plaster hidden behind an electrical box, identified through microscopic evaluation. 

It would also include sifting through the archives of Julius Shulman, the world-renowned photographer who documented the home in its heyday and shared never-before-seen photos with the restoration team. Those photos would drive the entire restoration. 

"This is one of the 20 best homes in this country, and it deserved that level of restoration."

—Ron Radziner

"After looking at the archives of Julius Shulman, it led us to better understand that it was quite a work of sculpture and much richer than really anyone knew, because nobody had seen Julius’ archives," says homeowner Brent Harris, who undertook the restoration with his former wife, Beth Harris. "The decision was made when we saw the famous Shulman photo from 1947, the twilight photo. It was taken in one snap—a one-time exposure. It seemed like right place to take the home back to."

"Neutra didn’t create the mountain. And the client bought wonderful land. If it didn't have mountains and the step down, it wouldn't be what it is," says owner of the Kaufmann House Brent Harris.

"Neutra didn’t create the mountain. And the client bought wonderful land. If it didn't have mountains and the step down, it wouldn't be what it is," says owner of the Kaufmann House Brent Harris.

Photo: Tim Street-Porter

The research team also discovered letters from Neutra to the original owner, Edgar Kaufmann, a wealthy department store owner who sought this property as a vacation home. He passed away in 1955, when the home was sold to a series of owners, including Barry Manilow. The letters helped solve what Harris describes as "a gigantic, national scavenger hunt for the pieces that were gone." They contained specs, sketches, and material details, which led to the team to identify the original buff stone. It originated from a quarry in Utah—but it had since closed. Conquering all obstacles in pursuit of authentic restoration, the team had the quarry reopened to procure the original stone. 

Slight modernization was thoughtfully incorporated into the restoration, including a cooling solution. "We wanted to lengthen the life of the home and make it more enduring," says Ron Radziner of Marmol Radziner. Air conditioning was added in a concealed fashion. Above, where the wood meets the plaster at the ceiling, an air return is carefully hidden, and ducting runs beneath the floor.

Slight modernization was thoughtfully incorporated into the restoration, including a cooling solution. "We wanted to lengthen the life of the home and make it more enduring," says Ron Radziner of Marmol Radziner. Air conditioning was added in a concealed fashion. Above, where the wood meets the plaster at the ceiling, an air return is carefully hidden, and ducting runs beneath the floor.

Photo: Tim Street-Porter

A final piece of the puzzle was consulting with several experts, including another architect who helped build Palm Springs, Albert Frey. "He taught me the importance of materials," says Harris, who worked closely with Marmol Radziner throughout the restoration. 

It wasn’t enough to just locate the origin of the buff stone; it would have to be set by the best masons they could find. It was initially installed using a dry stack technique—new to Neutra’s work—whereby mortar is applied to the rear of the stone, resulting in a natural look invisible to the eye. A mason worked at the site for a year and a half, chiseling and cutting blocks precisely in place to create a pleasing mosaic. Tops and bottoms of the stones were cut smooth to sit in horizontal position, allowing the sides and faces to be more organic. But the stone wasn’t the only meticulous detail of the renovation.

The vantage point of the famed "poolside gossip" photo that made Richard Neutra's Kaufmann House so well-known.

The vantage point of the famed "poolside gossip" photo that made Richard Neutra's Kaufmann House so well-known.

Brent Harris

The fascia sent the team on wild goose chase—or rather a crimped metal chase. They had never before seen that vertical pattern in metal and set out on a mission to reproduce the material. After sending 3" x 3" samples to sheet metal fabricators nationwide, they found a clue. A fabricator in Kansas City, Missouri, recognized the pattern—and likely made the original. They resuscitated an old machine they hadn’t used in 30 years to replicate the design. "We have worked on many renovations and have never done a project to that level of authenticity," says Radziner. "This was about expressing what Neutra originally intended, not us."

While a two-story structure did not meet the zoning code, Richard Neutra bypassed that via his design of a "gloriette," an outdoor room flanked by aluminum louvers. Those panels shelter the home against the harsh desert elements and were recreated as part of the five-year restoration of Richard Neutra's original design.

While a two-story structure did not meet the zoning code, Richard Neutra bypassed that via his design of a "gloriette," an outdoor room flanked by aluminum louvers. Those panels shelter the home against the harsh desert elements and were recreated as part of the five-year restoration of Richard Neutra's original design. 

Photo: Tim Street-Porter

About a decade before the home was designed, Kaufmann had commissioned another notable architect to design a home for him in Pennsylvania. The architect was Frank Lloyd Wright—and the project, Fallingwater. But unlike Frank Lloyd Wright, whose designs grow out of the landscape, Neutra’s designs descend upon it. The glass-and-steel home was, and still is, bold, given its harsh desert landscape—or as Neutra’s described it, the most uninhabitable site next to the moon. "It’s a bit of a stretch, but I definitely felt it several times with the temperature and special equipment needed to bring this about," says Harris.

Neutra's Kaufmann home was initially designed for living just two months out of the year. Yet after the original owner passed, future tenants attempted to retrofit the space for year-long use. An air conditioning unit was placed atop the roof, and square footage was added, enclosing this courtyard. To return it to its original state, the current owner underwent a five-year restoration and reopened this courtyard to honor the original design.

Neutra's Kaufmann home was initially designed for living just two months out of the year. Yet after the original owner passed, future tenants attempted to retrofit the space for year-long use. An air conditioning unit was placed atop the roof, and square footage was added, enclosing this courtyard. To return it to its original state, the current owner underwent a five-year restoration and reopened this courtyard to honor the original design.

Photo: Tim Street-Porter

The Kaufmanns only lived in the home some 60 days a year, and Neutra designed it as such. While the integration of radiant heating and cooling at that time made the home somewhat of a prototype, the home could not sustain long-term habitation without the intervention of air conditioning given the omnipresence of wood. It is one of just a few modern-day amenities that have been thoughtfully incorporated into the restoration. Ductwork was carefully inserted below ground. Return air can flow beneath a bed, and in the dining area ceiling, where wood meets plaster, an air return is cleverly concealed. 

"We really were true to the original goals of Neutra," says Radziner. "And we tried to very authentically recreate and restore what wasn’t there and make it authentic as humanly possible." 

After much research, the original buff stone pictured was discovered at a quarry in Utah, which had since closed but reopened for the material sourcing for this project, the restoration of Richard Neutra's Kaufmann House. A mason worked there for a year and a half to accurately restore stone, chiseling and cutting blocks precisely in place to create a pleasing mosaic. Tops and bottoms of the stones were cut smooth to sit in horizontal position, allowing the sides and faces to be more organic as Richard Neutra intended.

After much research, the original buff stone pictured was discovered at a quarry in Utah, which had since closed but reopened for the material sourcing for this project, the restoration of Richard Neutra's Kaufmann House. A mason worked there for a year and a half to accurately restore stone, chiseling and cutting blocks precisely in place to create a pleasing mosaic. Tops and bottoms of the stones were cut smooth to sit in horizontal position, allowing the sides and faces to be more organic as Richard Neutra intended.

Photo: Tim Street-Porter

The home is lauded in part because of Shulman’s work, but also because of its design, which has endured the test of time. Its pinwheel shape leaves the home without a backside, creating an organic orientation, photogenic from every angle. 

"Its place in history as a home—a pristine, modern sculpture in the raw desert—is incredible," says Radziner. "As you walk around and experience it, it’s incredibly dynamic. The significance of this home in the fundamental sense is that it’s moving to people."

The restoration of the Richard Neutra's Kaufmann house would take five years to complete.

The restoration of the Richard Neutra's Kaufmann house would take five years to complete. 

Courtesy of Marmol Radziner 

The meticulous restoration included the sourcing of the original toilets and tables. The steel louvers were recreated, serving both as privacy and sun screening for the top-floor, open-air "gloriette"—Neutra’s solution for zoning that restricts second stories. Subcontractors were given rigorous tests to evaluate not only their abilities, but also their interest in the project. And while a pool house was added to include amenities that accommodate modern-day lifestyles, it was designed to complement—never to compete—with the restored home, which has since been designated by the Palm Springs City Council as a Class 1 Historic Site, the most prestigious historic designation. Says Harris, "It pioneered the field for historic modern architecture."

"Its place in history as a home—a pristine, modern sculpture in the raw desert—is incredible."

—Ron Radziner

Richard Neutra was a disruptor. He built what he described as a machine amidst a harsh desert landscape that defied all odds. And thanks to the team who respected its significance and dedicated so much of their lives to honoring the integrity of the design, it will endure—as good design does. Says Harris, "My favorite part is seeing it through other people’s eyes. Ultimately, I’m really happy that it has inspired people to restore modern houses." 

"The home has an unusual resonance when you see it," says Kaufmann house owner Brent Harris. "It has a volumetric, spatial beauty that changes throughout the day, particularly at twilight. There are a lot of great Neutra houses, but this has different feel entirely. It's very photogenic."

"The home has an unusual resonance when you see it," says Kaufmann house owner Brent Harris. "It has a volumetric, spatial beauty that changes throughout the day, particularly at twilight. There are a lot of great Neutra houses, but this has different feel entirely. It's very photogenic."

Photo: Tim Street-Porter

Shop the Look

William Krisel's Palm Springs: The Language of Modernism

This first major monograph chronicling the work and architectural philosophy of William Krisel features examples and insights from Krisel's own papers, culled from his personal collection as well as the extensive archives of the Getty Research Institute. Krisel's architectural drawings and renderings, as well as many archival photographs, highlight examples of his custom homes, mass-produced housing, and recreational facilities in Palm Springs and rest of the Coachella Valley. Publisher: Gibbs Smith Photo Coutresy of Gibbs Smith

Knoll 1966 Collection Adjustable Chaise

In 1962, Florence Knoll asked designer Richard Schultz to create a collection of furniture that could withstand the outdoors. The result was the "1966 Collection" which became an instant classic with designs like the 1966 Adjustable Chaise Lounge. This furniture series revolutionized outdoor furniture with a clean, fresh look that remains fully relevant today. Photo courtesy of Knoll

Eames Molded Plywood Lounge Chair

Hailed by Time magazine as the Best Design of the 20th Century, the iconic LCW or “Lounge Chair Wood” (1946) began as an experiment in the Eameses’ apartment, where they were molding plywood in what they called the “Kazam! Machine.” The machine pressed thin sheets of wood veneer against a heated membrane that was inflated by a bicycle pump. Humble beginnings for what would become one of the world’s most widely recognized and highly coveted chairs. Low-slung, with an expertly crafted molded seat and back (no bike pumps are used today), this chair cradles you in a comfortable position while rubber shock mounts buffer against jarring movement. This original is an authentic product of Herman Miller®, Inc. Eames is a licensed trademark of Herman Miller. Made in U.S.A. Photo courtesy of YLiving

Few changes to the Richard Neutra's original design were made during the restoration of the Kaufmann house, including the addition of this pool house to better accommodate modern-day life. It was designed to complement—never to compete with—the restored home, which has since been designated by the Palm Springs City Council as a Class 1 Historic Site, the most prestigious historic designation. Says owner Brent Harris, "It pioneered the field for historic modern architecture."

Few changes to the Richard Neutra's original design were made during the restoration of the Kaufmann house, including the addition of this pool house to better accommodate modern-day life. It was designed to complement—never to compete with—the restored home, which has since been designated by the Palm Springs City Council as a Class 1 Historic Site, the most prestigious historic designation. Says owner Brent Harris, "It pioneered the field for historic modern architecture."

Brent Harris


Kaufmann House floor plan

Related Reading: Iconic Perspectives: Richard Neutra’s VDL Studio & Residences

Project Credits:

Architect: Richard Neutra

Restoration architect, interior designer, contractor: Marmol Radziner (Leo Marmol, FAIA, and Ron Radziner, FAIA) / @marmolradziner

Consultants: Cass Rogers (structural); Mel Bilow & Associates (mechanical); John Snyder & Associates (electrical); Seebohm Ltd. (architectural conservation); Reginald Hough (concrete); Eric Lamers and William Kopelk (landscape)


9 Cities That Will Actually Pay You to Live There

Permalink - Posted on 2019-03-13 19:08

As metropolitan areas swell in size, smaller towns face diminishing populations and a shortage of talented workers. To help revitalization, cities are handing out some pretty incredible perks to encourage new residents and investments.

If you’re looking for a new place to call home, have the option to work remotely, want to seek out new opportunities—or all of the above, you may be interested in checking out these places that offer some compelling incentives to move. Below, you’ll find 10 cities and states that will pay you to live there.

1. Tulsa, Oklahoma

The Tulsa Remote Program pays remote workers $10,000 to move to Tulsa, Oklahoma, for one year.

The Tulsa Remote Program pays remote workers $10,000 to move to Tulsa, Oklahoma, for one year.

Image Courtesy of Tulsa Remote

The Tulsa Remote Program pays remote workers $10,000 to move to Tulsa, Oklahoma, for one year. As part of a series of efforts to attract new talent, the program hopes to bring diverse and talented individuals to the city for community building and collaboration. A co-working membership, up to three months of discounted rent in Tulsa’s renowned Arts District, plus plenty of networking events, are all part of the perks. 

2. Candela, Italy

This serene retreat by acclaimed Italian designers Ludovica+Roberto Palomba, carved out of a 17th-century oil mill in Salento, demonstrates the charm of historic Italy.

This serene retreat by acclaimed Italian designers Ludovica+Roberto Palomba, carved out of a 17th-century oil mill in Salento, demonstrates the charm of historic Italy.

Photo: Francesco Bolis

This small Italian town is paying people $2,350 (2,000 euro) to move there. To help recover the town's population loss, the city’s mayor is offering up money to encourage people to relocate there and regain the town's reputation as "Little Naples." What was once filled with booming streets of tourists, merchants, and vendors, has diminished to just 2,700 residents. Baroque buildings, winding alleys, and picturesque terraces await new Candela residents.

3. Baltimore, Maryland

Nestled between Frederick Law Olmstead’s Patterson Park and Baltimore’s historic waterfront, Tap House emerges as a typical, unassuming, 16-foot-wide corner rowhouse common to the urban fabric of Baltimore.

Nestled between Frederick Law Olmstead’s Patterson Park and Baltimore’s historic waterfront, Tap House emerges as a typical, unassuming, 16-foot-wide corner rowhouse common to the urban fabric of Baltimore.

Image Courtesy of GriD Architects

Baltimore, Maryland, is hoping to get rid of its dilapidated neighborhoods and vacant lots. The historic port city is offering up to $10,000 for individuals to buy a vacant lot and develop it through Live Baltimore. Additional incentive programs, such as loans for home upgrades and rehabs of historic properties, hope to encourage and increase homeownership. All you have to do is attend a Trolley Tour to become eligible. 

4. New Richland, Minnesota

The ever-changing, lush wooded surroundings of Minnesota, such as those experienced at this 8,000-square-foot Type Variant House outside of Minneapolis designed by Coen and Partners, are right near the small town of New Richland.

Looking for free land to build the home of your dreams? The small town of New Richland, Minnesota—with a population of just 1,200—may be the perfect new stomping grounds. Just off 1-35 and near Minnesota’s major cities, lakes, golf courses, and trails lies the opportunity to acquire an 86-foot by 133-foot lot. Build a new home within a year after the property is deeded to you, and the land is free. 

5. Wellington, New Zealand

Inspired by the small scale of Japanese residences—in particular, Makoto Masuzawa’s 1952 Minimum House—architect Andrew Simpson designed his own economical 538-square-foot home, set into a wooded site in Island Bay, a coastal suburb outside Wellington, New Zealand.

Inspired by the small scale of Japanese residences—in particular, Makoto Masuzawa’s 1952 Minimum House—architect Andrew Simpson designed his own economical 538-square-foot home set into a wooded site in Island Bay, a coastal suburb outside Wellington, New Zealand.

Photo: Paul McCredie

Known as "Silicon Welly," Wellington, New Zealand. is looking to recruit 100 talented technology candidates across the globe with a focus on U.S. citizens. A program known as LookSee Wellington hopes to connect individuals with leading technology companies, creative people, and a great lifestyle. It is a place where people can make a positive impact, and a chance to connect with prospective employers. 

6. St. Louis, Missouri

The St. Louis Arch (1965), Saarinen's most recognizable architectural feat, is located in the heart of St. Louis.

For just $1, you can purchase city-owned property in St. Louis, Missouri. As part of an effort to reduce the number of vacant lots and in hopes of revitalizing fading neighborhoods, the St. Louis Dollar House Program has been implemented as a 1-year pilot program to sell single-family residential properties. With 18 months to renovate the property and 551 eligible properties, a dollar goes a long way here. 

7. Pipestone, Manitoba

The rural municipality of Pipestone in Southwestern Manitoba, Canada, will pay you a grant of up to $32,000 to transform your ideas into a business.

The rural municipality of Pipestone in Southwestern Manitoba, Canada, will pay you a grant of up to $32,000 to transform your ideas into a business.

Image Courtesy of Pipestone Community Development Corp.

The rural municipality of Pipestone in Southwestern Manitoba, Canada, will pay you a grant of up to $32,000 to transform your ideas into a business. Or, if building a home is more your speed, you can get a grant to help you build or buy a residence within the municipality. Pay a deposit of $1,000, and you can buy a lot for just $10. These are just two of the many initiatives designed to build a stronger, healthier community by encouraging residential and commercial development in this picturesque region along the Saskatchewan border.

8. Vermont

Architects Joan Soranno and John Cook of HGA developed five site-specific cabins that tread lightly on the land at Marlboro College in rural Vermont. These deceptively simple structures update the regional vernacular. Every year, Marlboro College hosts the Marlboro Music Festival in which classical musicians join together to hone their craft.  These cabins help support the musicians that live, work, and rehearse together.

Governor Phil Scott of Vermont has approved a piece of legislation that will pay 100 people up to $10,000 to move to Vermont with the new Remote Worker Grant Program. Aimed at remote working, the campaign hopes to attract new residents in a world of ever growing co-working capabilities. 

9. Marquette, Kansas

Located in Springfield, Missouri, this modern farmhouse designed by Kansas-City based firm Hufft Projects exudes the traditional vernacular of Kansas with an updated take on the conventional form. The rolling hills and expansive land resemble the tone of quaint Marquette.

Located in Springfield, Missouri, this modern farmhouse designed by Kansas-City based firm Hufft Projects exudes the traditional vernacular of Kansas with an updated take on the conventional form. The rolling hills and expansive land resemble the tone of quaint Marquette. 

Photo: Joe Pugliese

If a small town is more your scene, the forward-thinking community of Marquette, Kansas is a great option to live and raise a family, right in the heart of America. Surrounded by wide-open rolling hills, expansive vistas, and just over 600 residents, the town has plenty of free land waiting to be built upon.

Related Reading: Now You Can Buy a Historic Home in Italy For Just €1   


This Tiny Transforming Apartment Is a Playground For Pets

Permalink - Posted on 2019-03-13 18:37

Sim-Plex Design Studio creates a home that shifts and adapts, with dedicated nooks and crannies for three people, a parrot, and a cat.

The two halves of the home can be sectioned off with sliding glass doors—one side for the parrot, and one for the cat.

The name says it all. Pets Playground is a multifaceted 453-square-foot residence in Yuen Long, Hong Kong, that puts the family’s most important members first—their fur babies.

The tiny apartment is filled with clever space-saving solutions, including built-in storage and transforming furniture.

The tiny apartment is filled with clever space-saving solutions, including built-in storage and transforming furniture.

Courtesy of Sim-Plex Design Studio

As the house is shared between a young couple, one of their mothers, a cat, and a parrot, Pets Playground is all about creating balance between partners, generations, and species.

The two halves of the home can be sectioned off with sliding glass doors—one side for the parrot, and one for the cat.

The two halves of the home can be sectioned off with sliding glass doors—one side for the parrot, and one for the cat. 

Photo: Studio D Design

The doors are birdhouse-shaped to match the pets theme.

The doors are birdhouse-shaped to match the pets theme.

Courtesy of Sim-Plex Design Studio

Sim-Plex Design Studio created a private space for each member of the family, as well as communal spaces for everyone to gather—essential for striking harmony between multiple personalities under one roof.

A view into one of the apartment's many cat holes.

A view into one of the apartment's many cat holes.

Courtesy of Sim-Plex Design Studio

The cat, prowling in the dining area.

The cat, prowling in the dining area. 

Courtesy of Sim-Plex Design Studio

"Pets Playground not only is a project designed for pets, but also a standpoint to achieve a balance between privacy and communion through spatial layout, bringing a new inspiration to the co-living social problems of young and elderly," explains Patrick Lam, founder and creative director of Sim-Plex.

A view of the master bedroom.

A view of the master bedroom.

Courtesy of Sim-Plex Design Studio

The resident kitty exiting the cat house in the mother's room.

The resident kitty exiting the cat house in the mother's room. 

Courtesy of Sim-Plex Design Studio

Sim-Plex created a flexible layout to fulfill the many living requirements of the residents and to provide activities for their pets. The couple’s parrot enjoys basking in the sun, so its cage is located in the living room in front of a large west-facing window that captures warm afternoon light. A sliding door closes off the raised living area so the parrot can safely come out of its cage for some exercise, without fear of interaction with the cat. 

The extra wide cabinet top is specifically designed to hold the cage. Underneath lies extra seating for when the full dining table is rolled out of the kitchen cabinet.

The extra wide cabinet top is specifically designed to hold the cage. Underneath lies extra seating for when the full dining table is rolled out of the kitchen cabinet. 

Courtesy of Sim-Plex Design Studio

Sliding fritted glass doors provide privacy and sectioned-off spaces when needed.

Sliding fritted glass doors provide privacy and sectioned-off spaces when needed. 

Courtesy of Sim-Plex Design Studio

The sliding glass doors in the center of the home separate the couple’s master bedroom and living room from the mother’s bedroom and the dining area. The materials and color palette shift slightly between the two spaces, with light maple and gray tones in the master bedroom and living area. and white oak in the other two rooms.

A bench by the door doubles as a litter box.

A bench by the door doubles as a litter box. 

Courtesy of Sim-Plex Design Studio

Clean lines and an airy palette continue in the bathroom.

Clean lines and an airy palette continue in the bathroom.

Courtesy of Sim-Plex Design Studio

The playground aspect of the home applies most to the mother’s cat. The dining table is integrated into a cabinet to provide more room to roam, and the cabinets create a sort of fort with round holes and walkways to explore. At the entryway, a seat doubles as a kitty litter box enclosure.

The dining area unfolds from a cabinet.

The dining area unfolds from a cabinet. 

Courtesy of Sim-Plex Design Studio

When more seating is required, the family can simply roll out more table space. The extra seating comes out from under the bird cabinet in the living room.

When more seating is required, the family can simply roll out more table space. The extra seating comes out from under the bird cabinet in the living room.

Courtesy of Sim-Plex Design Studio

All wooden furniture is made from ecologically sound melamine-faced board to prevent the cat from scratching. This material choice also reduces exposure to formaldehyde, which is commonly used in composite wood products. In the mother’s bedroom, a built-in cat house sits in the wardrobe, while a catwalk and a cubby with steps floats above the bed.

Situated above the bed is a catwalk and cubby with steps.

Situated above the bed is a catwalk and cubby with steps. 

Courtesy of Sim-Plex Design Studio

The mother's bedroom cabinet holds a built-in cat house.

The mother's bedroom cabinet holds a built-in cat house.

Courtesy of Sim-Plex Design Studio


8 Egg-Shaped Buildings That Can’t Be Beat

Permalink - Posted on 2019-03-13 18:09

Omelette you finish, but these are the best egg-shaped buildings of all time.

This egg-shaped sauna represents rebirth, as the city of Kiruna seeks a new beginning.

Suddenly, it feels like everywhere we look an egg-shaped structure is popping up. From a mirrored, golden sauna to a perfectly oval, wood-shingled tree house, each one is unique in its own way. Intrigued? There are even a couple companies offering these cozy capsules for sale.

1. Pigna Tree Houses in the Italian Dolomites

Located in the woods of Malborghetto Valbruna in the Italian Dolomite commune of Tarvisio, this egg-shaped tree house appears to hover in midair like a giant pinecone.

Located in the woods of Malborghetto Valbruna in the Italian Dolomite commune of Tarvisio, this egg-shaped tree house appears to hover in midair like a giant pinecone.

Courtesy of DomusGaia

The Pigna tree houses were created by Tarvisio-based architect Claudio Beltrame in collaboration with DomusGaia, an Italian firm that manufactures wooden prefabricated homes. The team developed the dwellings for an architectural competition in 2014, and they're now available as holiday rentals.

2. Arctic Cabin in Hammerfest, Norway

Hexagonal and pentagonal panels come together to form this cabin’s oblong envelope. The unique architectural skin mimics the rock formations that surround it.

Hexagonal and pentagonal panels come together to form this cabin’s oblong envelope. The unique architectural skin mimics the rock formations that surround it.

Courtesy of SPINN Architects

This 150-square-foot cabin gives hikers a comfortable place to rest and recharge while hiking through the rugged, unspoiled beauty of Hammerfest, Norway. The region was previously inaccessible due to its challenging terrain and harsh climate, so the Norwegian Trekking Association developed plans for a "day trip" shelter in collaboration with SPINN Architects and Format Engineers to encourage exploration. This unique egg-shaped structure, dubbed the Hammerfest Cabin, is the result.

3. Egg-Shaped Camping Pod in the Loire

Based on the travels of a beloved French naturalist, Mr. Plocq's Caballon is an egg-shaped cabin that takes cues from both naval and aircraft carpentry.

Based on the travels of a beloved French naturalist, Mr. Plocq's Caballon is an egg-shaped cabin that takes cues from both naval and aircraft carpentry.

Courtesy of Loirestua – Aurélien Mahot

Architects Aurélie Poirrier, Igor-Vassili Pouchkarevtch-Dragoche, and Vincent O’Connor took inspiration from French naturalist Émile Plocq when they created this egg-shaped camping pod. Mr. Plocq’s Caballon is located on the banks of the Loire estuary.

Inspired by the Plocq's expeditions to Africa, the pod has a naval vessel’s wooden hull, with a cockpit-like top half that is covered in white canvas and clear plastic, so guests can enjoy a view of the stars as they sleep. The team built the 161-square-foot structure for the annual Imaginary Nights event hosted by Loirestua, the local tourism board, which allows visitors to stay in extraordinary quarters along the Loire estuary.

4. A Golden, Egg-Shaped Sauna in Sweden

This egg-shaped sauna represents rebirth, as the city of Kiruna seeks a new beginning.

This egg-shaped sauna represents rebirth, as the city of Kiruna seeks a new beginning.

Jean-Baptiste Béranger

Sweden’s northernmost city, Kiruna, sits above a giant iron ore mine owned by the state-run mining company Luossavaara-Kiirunavaara Aktiebolag (LKAB). Over a century of industry has endangered the stability of the location, so in 2004, city officials resolved to shift the entire city about two miles east. 

To commemorate the move, Swedish housing cooperative Riksbyggen enlisted internationally-acclaimed artists Mats Bigert and Lars Bergström to create a public art installation. The resulting Solar Egg is an ovoid sauna constructed out of 69 polygons of gold-plated stainless steel. Inside, a heart-shaped wood-fired burner heats the fully-functional sauna. Stateside sauna fans now have a chance to check out the Solar Egg, as it will be installed in downtown Minneapolis from March 6 to April 28.

5. Egg-Shaped Beach Cabins in Korea

These tiny egg-shaped cabins are mounted onto small podiums to keep them stable.

These tiny egg-shaped cabins are mounted onto small podiums to keep them stable.

Photo by Indiphos / Gimyoun Song.

Korean studio Yoon Space designed these white, egg-shaped pods for easy mobility. The tiny seaside cabins, which the firm calls "Albang," are only 21 square feet long. The pods are hand-whittled from blocks of polystyrene, making them light enough to be easily transported.

6. An Egg-Shaped "Blob" For Sale in Belgium

The Blob's nose can be opened automatically, and it functions as a little porch.

The Blob's nose can be opened automatically, and it functions as a little porch.

Photo by Frederik Vercruysse /dmvA

Belgian firm dmvA originally designed this egg-shaped "Blob" as an office space for a client. However, when the firm was unable to obtain a building permit, they redefined the mobile unit as an "art object" in order to skirt strict building regulations.

The small, smooth egg may be compact, but it is designed to house everything you need: a bathroom, a kitchen, lighting, a bed, and even storage. You can even order a Blob of your own (price available upon request).

7. Egg-Shaped Houseboat in Hampshire, UK

The Exbury Egg asks us to reexamine the way we live while carefully considering sustainability and the use of natural resources.

The Exbury Egg is an egg-shaped, energy-efficient, self-sustaining workspace built for British artist Stephen Turner. Turner worked with Space Placemaking and Urban Design and PAD Studio to develop the Egg, which was set in the River Beaulieu estuary on Exbury Estate, Hampshire, UK.

The team developed the Exbury Egg as an artwork, a temporary place for Turner to stay, and a laboratory for studying the life of the tidal creek. Over time, it took on the patina of the daily tides and over 18 months of weathering by wind, rain, and the sun.

8. The Self-Sufficient, Egg-Shaped Ecocapsule

The Ecocapsule is completely self-sufficient. It can be used as a cottage, pop-up hotel, caravan, mobile office, or research station.

The Ecocapsule is completely self-sufficient. It can be used as a cottage, pop-up hotel, caravan, mobile office, or research station.

Courtesy of Ecocapsule

The Ecocapsule is a smart, self-sustaining micro-home that is entirely powered by solar and wind energy. The vessel is designed to enable residents to explore remote locations with the luxury of their very own micro hotel room.

Related Reading: A Fantastic Egg-Shaped Camping Pod Along the Loire Estuary, This Egg-Shaped Cabin Provides Shelter for Arctic Circle Travelers


44 Chic Accessories Purr-fect For Your Pampered Pet

Permalink - Posted on 2019-03-13 18:06

Great design isn't just reserved for humans. Whether your animal companion is a cat, dog, fish, or bird, a wide selection of stylish beds, toys, treats, and tech accessories are available. From sculptural bird feeders to colorful dog booties, our picks below will be a delight to both pet and owner.

Made By Pen Dog House With Bamboo Mattress
Meowfia Premium Felt Cat Cave Bed
Aesop Animal Wash
Pet-tecture
Dish of Desire Bird Feeder


Thieves Stole $200k Worth of Pieces From Frank Lloyd Wright’s Freeman House

Permalink - Posted on 2019-03-13 16:44

Four pieces of architectural history have reportedly been stolen from Frank Lloyd Wright's Freeman House in Los Angeles, while under the care of the University of Southern California.

According to the LAPD, thieves have stolen four pieces of architectural history from Frank Lloyd Wright's Freeman House.

Photo by Julius Shulman © J. Paul Getty Trust. Getty Research Institute, Los Angeles (2004.R.10)

The Los Angeles Police department has just released photos of four items of furniture stolen from Frank Lloyd Wright’s Samuel Freeman House. Likely worth hundreds of thousands of dollars, the pieces disappeared from a warehouse where the home’s furniture was being stored following an earthquake that damaged the property. According to the LAPD, the theft actually occurred sometime in 2012, but the crime has only recently been reported to them.

The interior of the Samuel Freeman house.

Photo by Julius Shulman © J. Paul Getty Trust. Getty Research Institute, Los Angeles (2004.R.10)

The interior of the Samuel Freeman house.

Julius Shulman © J. Paul Getty Trust. Getty Research Institute, Los Angeles (2004.R.10)

These Frank Lloyd Wright floor lamps, 1924, were originally made for the Freeman House and have been reported stolen.

These Frank Lloyd Wright floor lamps, 1924, were originally made for the Freeman House and have been reported stolen.

Photo courtesy LAPD

A press release from the police department describes the four items of original furniture as two floor lamps designed by Frank Lloyd Wright and a folding chair and tea cart designed by Rudolph Schindler. Schindler was an Austrian-American architect who worked with Wright in L.A. in the 1920s. According to an investigative report published in the Los Angeles Times last month, USC campus police filed the report on Jan 22, 2019, over seven years after the theft occurred.

"The four items of furniture disappeared from a locked room within the storage facility sometime between July 5 to September 17, 2012," says the LAPD. "There were no signs of forced entry. The storage facility is managed by USC's School of Architecture."

The Samuel Freeman House is one of the four textile block houses designed by Frank Lloyd Wright in California in the early ’20s. The other three are the Storer House, Ennis House, and Millard House.

Photo by Julius Shulman © J. Paul Getty Trust. Getty Research Institute, Los Angeles (2004.R.10)

The Samuel Freeman House is one of the four textile-block houses designed by Frank Lloyd Wright in California in the early ’20s. The other three are the Storer House, Ennis House, and Millard House.

Julius Shulman © J. Paul Getty Trust. Getty Research Institute, Los Angeles (2004.R.10)

A Rudolph Schindler tea cart from the 1930s, constructed of wood, glass, metal, and rubber, and measuring 32 1/4" x 28" x 17 1/2", is among the items taken from the Freeman collection.

A Rudolph Schindler tea cart from the 1930s, constructed of wood, glass, metal, and rubber, and measuring 32 1/4" x 28" x 17 1/2", is among the items taken from the Freeman collection.

Photo courtesy LAPD

Built in 1924, the home is situated on a steep slope in the Hollywood Hills, appearing from street view to be one level, but actually extending two more levels down. The Freemans were active in Los Angeles' artistic and political circles, running their home as an informal salon, adding to its cultural importance. 

The interior of the Samuel Freeman house.

Photo by Julius Shulman © J. Paul Getty Trust. Getty Research Institute, Los Angeles (2004.R.10)

The interior of the Samuel Freeman house.

Julius Shulman © J. Paul Getty Trust. Getty Research Institute, Los Angeles (2004.R.10)

The home was donated to the University of Southern California’s School of Architecture in 1984, but ten years later the Northridge earthquake caused significant damage to the 12,000 cast concrete blocks that make up the walls of the home. The damage left the building uninhabitable. At that point, the furniture was removed to a storage unit in south L.A.

This Rudolph Schindler wooden folding chair, 1930s, is also missing.

This Rudolph Schindler wooden folding chair, 1930s, is also missing.

Photo courtesy LAPD

Richard Wright, president of the Wright auction house in Chicago, told Curbed.com that the stolen pieces could be worth close to $200,000. The lamps he estimated as being worth $50,000 to $70,000 each, the chair $10,000 to $15,000, and the tea cart $20,000 to $30,000.

Anyone with information on the theft is asked to contact the Los Angeles Police Department at 213.486.6940 or visit www.lapdonline.org.

Related Reading: Frank Lloyd Wright’s Iconic Ennis House Is Listed For $23M 

Freeman House photos by Julius Shulman © J. Paul Getty Trust. Getty Research Institute, Los Angeles (2004.R.10) 


Before & After: An Architect Couple Expand a Coveted Eichler For a Growing Family

Permalink - Posted on 2019-03-12 22:02

Once locked in a bidding war with the homeowners and now fast friends and neighbors, BLAINE Architects gives a 1953 Eichler in California’s South Bay some much-needed space and an outdoor connection.

Architect Megan Blaine and her husband had their hearts set on buying a charming, 1,449-square-foot Eichler home in California’s South Bay, but another couple’s offer on the circa-1953 abode won the bidding war instead. Across the street, the Blaines found solace in a different Eichler.

"After we moved in, we begrudgingly went over to introduce ourselves, and found out we were not only the same age, we were both expecting our first kids around the same time," remembers Blaine, founder and CEO of the locally-based, husband-and-wife-helmed BLAINE Architects. "They became our good friends, and when the time came for them to have their second baby, they called us to see if we would help them redesign their home to work for a bigger family. It’s always good to have an architect who is already in love with your house."

Before: The Entry 

Before: The original corridor felt dark and cramped.

After: The Entry

Natural light and greenery combine with wood, glass, and custom-milled exterior siding to give the hallway an open, welcoming feel.

Natural light and greenery combine with wood, glass, and custom-milled exterior siding to give the hallway an open, welcoming feel.

Photo: Jean Bai / Konstrukt Photo

Smitten with the Jones and Emmons-built Eichler, Blaine, in collaboration with Silicon Valley interior designer Pamela Lin-Tam of Urbanism Designs, spent nearly two years rehabbing it, adding square footage and improving flow by converting the signature Eichler carport into an atrium, playroom, office, and second bathroom. The kitchen was also significantly upgraded.

Before: The Kitchen

Previously, the kitchen was shrouded in wood.

After: The Kitchen and Living Room

For the new kitchen, which was rotated perpendicularly to improve circulation, interior designer Pamela Lin-Tam opted for "interior finishes that reflect the time period, but don't feel old or outdated," says architect Megan Blaine. Modular cabinets are paired with quartz countertops.

For the new kitchen, which was rotated perpendicularly to improve circulation, interior designer Pamela Lin-Tam opted for "interior finishes that reflect the time period, but don't feel old or outdated," says architect Megan Blaine. Modular cabinets are paired with quartz countertops.

Photo: Jean Bai / Konstrukt Photo

Kitchen, dining, and living spaces seamlessly flow into one another, accentuated by lighting fixtures and furnishings selected by Lin-Tam. In a nod to the vinyl composite tile that comprised the floors of original Eichler houses, commercial solid vinyl tile was chosen for its similar retro, monolithic look.

Kitchen, dining, and living spaces seamlessly flow into one another, accentuated by lighting fixtures and furnishings selected by Lin-Tam. In a nod to the vinyl composite tile that comprised the floors of original Eichler houses, commercial solid vinyl tile was chosen for its similar retro, monolithic look.

Photo: Jean Bai / Konstrukt Photo

Every mahogany wall was replaced with new ones, the contractor "painstakingly going through literally hundreds of panels over several days to find ones that matched," recalls Blaine. Since the quarter inch-round mahogany corners at the outside of the interior walls found in Eichler homes are no longer made, Blaine worked with the contractor to find a supplier of rounds that were then cut down to quarters.

Every mahogany wall was replaced with new ones, the contractor "painstakingly going through literally hundreds of panels over several days to find ones that matched," recalls Blaine. Since the quarter inch-round mahogany corners at the outside of the interior walls found in Eichler homes are no longer made, Blaine worked with the contractor to find a supplier of rounds that were then cut down to quarters.

Photo: Jean Bai / Konstrukt Photo

Before: The Carport

Before: By transforming this one-time carport into an atrium, Blaine expanded the Eichler home while maintaining its architectural integrity.

After: The Carport

When a custom-fabricated box beam proved too cost prohibitive, Blaine’s engineer devised a steel beam strong enough to span the 18-foot length of the rear wall that didn’t feel too heavy and didn’t look out of place beside the original wood beams. "Then we painted all of the structure a warm black so it becomes a feature and ties everything—new and old—together," adds Blaine.

When a custom-fabricated box beam proved too cost prohibitive, Blaine’s engineer devised a steel beam strong enough to span the 18-foot length of the rear wall that didn’t feel too heavy and didn’t look out of place beside the original wood beams. "Then we painted all of the structure a warm black so it becomes a feature and ties everything—new and old—together," adds Blaine.

Photo: Jean Bai / Konstrukt Photo

Shop the Look

Vitra Popsicle Wall Clock

George Nelson's iconic 1950s wall clocks are emblems of mid-century joie de vivre. Now, in collaboration with Vitra, this radiant timepiece is back in production and available for your enjoyment. Photo Courtesy of Nordstrom

Louis Poulsen PH 5 Mini Pendant

The PH 5 Mini Pendant by Louis Poulsen was designed by Poul Henningsen in 1958 to create glare-free light. With multiple finishes to choose from, hanging the pendant anywhere is easy. The pendant uses three shades, because of this the light is illuminated downward and out, creating a sense that it is lighting itself. When you hear the name Louis Poulsen, you think distinctive modern Danish lighting. From the classic icons of the 1920s to more recent pieces, all Louis Poulsen lighting is created based on a deep-felt respect for architecture, understanding the emotional effect of lighting and the belief that shadow is just as aesthetically important as light. All three aspects manifest themselves in the sculptural layering and comfortable, glare-free light of Louis Poulsen pendants, wall, table, and floor lamps. Photo Courtesy of Lumens

Eric Trine Column Side Table + Tray

LA-based designer Eric Trine designs by making, rather than drawing. Made of powder-coated steel, these column-inspired tables bring sleek style by your side, yet still keep things light and open. Includes an easy-to-clean and removable tray, perfect for placing drinks, snacks, and books. Photo courtesy of West Elm

A folding glass NanaWall system "allows the clients to keep an eye on their kids while working in the kitchen," says Blaine, who dubbed the space the 'NanAtrium.' "It helps keep the kids safe and contained, and helps the family get back to enjoying life." A swing door provides easy in-and-out access when the glass wall isn't fully opened.

A folding glass NanaWall system "allows the clients to keep an eye on their kids while working in the kitchen," says Blaine, who dubbed the space the 'NanAtrium.' "It helps keep the kids safe and contained, and helps the family get back to enjoying life." A swing door provides easy in-and-out access when the glass wall isn't fully opened.

Photo: Jean Bai / Konstrukt Photo

"Eichlers are beautiful because they’re honest. You see the structure, you see the roof deck, everything is exposed because there are no attics above or crawlspaces below," says Blaine. "So that’s how we approached the design from start to finish: How can we make this building beautiful and honest?" 

A Fireclay-tiled second bathroom with Kerf cabinets is yet another boon of the extension.

One way was, per the couple's wishes, by forgoing traditional gray and painting the exterior "international orange," a calming color inspired by the Golden Gate Bridge. Another was sprucing up the kitchen with avocado green and sky blue laminate accents that mix with walnut laminated plywood, back painted glass, and stainless steel. 

Cutting a sizable hole in the roof spawned the light-filled atrium, the centerpiece of the now 1,825-square-foot house. Honoring the fixed glass walls original to Eichler homes, Blaine specified an energy-efficient, four-panel folding glass NanaWall system that stacks to the side when open so that while children play, the parents, in full sight of their little ones, cook and entertain in the kitchen. 

Before: Dining Area

Before: In the old iteration, the indoors only flirted with the outdoors.

After: Dining Area

Exterior siding is often brought into Eichler homes to reinforce the coveted connection between inside and outside.

Exterior siding is often brought into Eichler homes to reinforce the coveted connection between inside and outside. 

Photo: Jean Bai / Konstrukt Photo

It's exactly what the social couple—who incorporated another, larger NanaWall folding glass wall system at the back of the kitchen to create an indoor/outdoor dining space—wanted. "Any parent will tell you it’s hard to keep kids in a playroom with guests over. They want to be part of the action. But if you think about a traditional playroom, it’s usually in a boring extra bedroom, or tucked away in a dark basement. Who wants to hang out there?" says Blaine. "Give kids the coolest space in the house, and of course they’re going to want to stay." 

The Eichler home's original floor plan.
The updated floor plan

Related Reading: Before & After: A Luminous Remodel Breathes New Life Into a Palo Alto Eichler

Project Credits: 

Architect of Record: BLAINE Architects / @blainearchitects

Builder/General Contractor: Hanaray Construction / Peter Hanaray

Structural Engineer: KFSE (Kurt Fischer Structural Engineering) 

Interior Design: Urbanism Designs/Pamela Lin-Tam

Cabinetry Design/Installation: Kerf Design/Shara Lee

Have your own Before & After to share? Find out how to submit to Dwell.


A William Krisel-Designed Midcentury in Palm Springs Lists For Under $1.2M

Permalink - Posted on 2019-03-12 20:39

A carefully restored post-and-beam with a spectacular indoor/outdoor connection hits the market.

The home's plumbing, roof, air conditioning, and electrical systems have been fully replaced and upgraded, and the home is solar ready.

William Krisel left a strong mark on the city of Palm Springs—one that particularly resonates in the iconic subdivision of Twin Palms, the first modern tract neighborhood in town. A collection of about 90 homes, Twin Palms was a shared project of the celebrated midcentury architect and the George and Bob Alexander Construction company. 

Chris Menrad, the listing agent for the property at 1042 E. Apache Road and author of William Krisel’s Palm Springs: The Language of Modernism, notes, "The genius of Krisel is that he was able to show the Alexanders (his customer and the builder of Twin Palms) how to offer a product to the buyer that looked like a custom home, but was quasi-assembly line built with almost a modular concept of commonality of floor plan and construction technique." From the street, each home looks unique, but the floor plans are essentially the same. This winning combination was a hit for the Alexander Construction Company, propelling them to construct almost 2,000 additional units which forever changed the look of Palm Springs. 

The long, low-slung facade of carefully masoned stone helps integrate the home into its desert surroundings.

The long, low-slung facade of carefully masoned stone helps integrate the home into its desert surroundings. 

Photo: Dan Chavkin

Originally built in 1957, the home features many of the architect’s signature touches. "Krisel's long gable design presents a rugged facade of carefully masoned desert stone," says Menrad. 

At the rear of the home, however, Krisel employed a different design narrative, and the home opens up "with delicate panes of glass bracketing the massive stone fireplace." This expansive wall of glass gives the home a true indoor/outdoor connection and floods the living space with natural light, magnificent mountain views, and a rooted sense of place in the California desert. 

A wooden pergola shades the entrance to the home.

A wooden pergola shades the entrance to the home. 

Photo: Dan Chavkin

Classic midcentury features like the wall of glass and clerestory windows provide the home with a connection to the outdoors and flood the living space with natural light. A rough stone-inlay fireplace connects the living room with the facade.

Classic midcentury features like the wall of glass and clerestory windows provide the home with a connection to the outdoors and flood the living space with natural light. A rough stone-inlay fireplace connects the living room with the facade.

Photo: Dan Chavkin

The bright and airy, open-plan layout includes the dining area, living area, and kitchen. Sliding glass doors open to the outdoor terrace and swimming pool.

The bright and airy, open-plan layout includes the dining area, living area, and kitchen. Sliding glass doors open to the outdoor terrace and swimming pool.

Photo: Dan Chavkin

The kitchen updates remain true to the home’s midcentury character. Terrazzo tiles are used throughout the home.

The kitchen updates remain true to the home’s midcentury character. Terrazzo tiles are used throughout the home. 

Photo: Dan Chavkin

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West Elm Mid-Century Upholstered Dining Chair

Standing on your choice of metal or solid wood legs, our Mid-Century Dining Chair is retro-inspired comfort that's built to last. Its wide, cushy seat and sloping back offers an inviting seat for lingering guests and long dinner parties. Photo Courtesy of West Elm

West Elm Mid-Century Overarching Floor Lamp

A mid-century take on the overarching floor lamp, this antique bronze-finished beauty sits on a round marble base. Its shade shifts to let you direct light where you need it most. Photo Courtesy of West Elm

California Captured: Mid-Century Modern Architecture

The style and mythology of Mid-Century Modern California architecture as seen through the expert lens of Marvin Rand. Los Angeles photographer Marvin Rand created iconic images of some of the most celebrated architectural creations of his time, photographing buildings by the likes of Modernist masters Craig Ellwood, Louis Kahn, and Frank Lloyd Wright to capture the essence of their work - and, in doing so, played a critical role in shaping the Mid-Century California style now worshiped the world over. The discovery of Rand's archive has brought a treasure trove to life, and California Captured showcases it - and the period - as never before. Photo courtesy of Phaidon Press Publisher: Phaidon Press

Globe pendant lighting illuminates the interiors.

Globe pendant lighting illuminates the interiors.

Photo: Dan Chavkin

The master bedroom also enjoys outdoor access, while a vaulted ceiling contributes to a sense of space.

The master bedroom also enjoys outdoor access, while a vaulted ceiling contributes to a sense of space.

Photo: Dan Chavkin

The updated master bath gets lots of natural light.

The updated master bath gets lots of natural light.

Photo: Dan Chavkin

The den also has a strong indoor/outdoor connection.

The den also has a strong indoor/outdoor connection. 

Photo: Dan Chavkin

This room, currently used as an office space, is in an addition added by the original owners as a second master suite.

This room, currently used as an office space, is in an addition added by the original owners as a second master suite. 

Photo: Dan Chavkin

A new spa and a fully remodeled pool entertain guests outdoors.

A new spa and a fully remodeled pool entertain guests outdoors.

Photo: Dan Chavkin

The home's plumbing, roof, air conditioning, and electrical systems have been fully replaced and upgraded, and the home is solar ready.

The home's plumbing, roof, air conditioning, and electrical systems have been fully replaced and upgraded, and the home is solar ready. 

Photo: Dan Chavkin

William Krisel's Palm Springs: The Language of Modernism

This first major monograph chronicling the work and architectural philosophy of William Krisel features examples and insights from Krisel's own papers, culled from his personal collection as well as the extensive archives of the Getty Research Institute. Krisel's architectural drawings and renderings, as well as many archival photographs, highlight examples of his custom homes, mass-produced housing, and recreational facilities in Palm Springs and rest of the Coachella Valley. Publisher: Gibbs Smith Photo Coutresy of Gibbs Smith

1042 E. Apache Road is now being listed for $1,195,000 by Chris Menrad of TTK Represents. 

Know of a home for sale or rent that should be featured on Dwell.com? Find out how to submit to Dwell.


IKEA Upcycles Furniture Into Homes For Birds, Bees, ​and Bats

Permalink - Posted on 2019-03-12 19:58

Swedish furniture giant IKEA partners with London artists to build homes for wildlife out of repurposed furniture.

To mark the recent opening of its new store in Greenwich, London, IKEA is giving back to local wildlife. The company's "Wild Homes for Wildlife" project put local artists and designers to work transforming IKEA products into animal apartments for local birds, bats, and insects. These critter comfort pads will be located across Sutcliffe Park in southeast London, and you can actually visit them by downloading a trail map.

Pipi is a bat house created by graphic artist Supermundane from an old IKEA INDUSTRIELL shelving unit. Roughened surfaces inside help bats get a good grip when they roost during the day.

Pipi is a bat house created by graphic artist Supermundane from an old IKEA INDUSTRIELL shelving unit. Roughened surfaces inside help bats get a good grip when they roost during the day. 

Photo by MOTHER/IKEA

It's nearly impossible to recognize the source materials that went into these largely colorful creations, and while it's a clever marketing stunt, the upcycling project is in line with IKEA's long-term sustainability strategy, launched in 2012. The store is aiming to achieve a BREEAM "Outstanding" accreditation by incorporating a number of green technologies, including solar panels and rainwater harvesting. 

Honey I’m Home! by Hattie Newman is a Brazilian-style bee village created from an old IKEA BURVIK side table.

Honey I’m Home! by Hattie Newman is a Brazilian-style bee village created from an old IKEA BURVIK side table. 

Photo by MOTHER/IKEA

London–based artists, architects, and designers—including Hattie Newman, Adam Furman, and Supermundane—used chairs, tables, and kitchen worktops from the reuse and recycle area in the Greenwich store to create livable spaces for bees, birds, bats, and insects.

"IKEA Greenwich is our leading sustainable store and we want to have a positive impact on the local environment," says Helen Aylett, IKEA Greenwich store manager. "By offering a community experience centered on reuse and recycling and supporting local conservation, we want to demonstrate that we’re committed to being a good neighbor for all walks of life in Greenwich and the surrounding area—creepy crawlies included!"

Fladdermösshus is designed by architect Je Ahn, founder of Studio Weave. The bat roosts are constructed from old IKEA KVISTBRO metal tables.

Fladdermösshus is designed by architect Je Ahn, founder of Studio Weave. The bat roosts are constructed from old IKEA KVISTBRO metal tables.

Photo by MOTHER/IKEA

Hattie Newman, an artist and set maker, created a Brazilian-style bee village from an old side table. She found the project to be a really heartwarming one to be part of. "As an artist, I’m passionate about sustainability and reusing materials wherever possible," she says. "I’m excited to see the people of Greenwich engage with the project and hopefully get some inspiration for protecting local wildlife in their own backyard."

Månstråle House by Beep Studio features nesting pods created from old IKEA STRÅLA lamp stands. The pods are positioned at the right height for common British birds like blue tits and great tits.

South London's winged creatures will surely enjoy their upgraded digs, but we'd love to see what type of homes these designers could conjure up for some of London's larger wildlife—Paddington Bear perhaps? The Wombles of Wimbledon?

The Bug Bud by Iain Talbot. This bright blue bug hotel is made from old IKEA chairs and leftover cladding from an IKEA store.

The Bug Bud by Iain Talbot. This bright blue bug hotel is made from old IKEA chairs and leftover cladding from an IKEA store. 

Photo by MOTHER/IKEA

Shop The Look

Beekman Bird Feeder

Raise the roof with this deceptively simple bird feeder in the form of a house designed to compliment traditional and modern architecture. Your yard will be the talk of the flock. Photo Courtesy of Kaufmann Mercantile

Dish of Desire Bird Feeder

Treat your furry and feathered friends to a multi-course meal by adding food to each level of the feeder. Crafted from durable red cedar and aluminum, this simple design is clever, playful and functional, too. Photo Courtesy of AHA

Eva Solo Hanging Bird Feeder Tube

A bird’s singing is beautiful, which is why we should ensure birds receive the nutrition they need - especially in winter. The new bird feeder tube by Eva Solo is a simple, subdued and modern reinterpretation of traditional automatic bird feeder units. Small birds will be able to land without a problem on the feeder tube, which can be placed in the garden, on the balcony or in front of the window. They can settle down at the edge of the opening and help themselves to the food. The feeder tube is easily separated for cleaning. It is made of frost-safe glass and silicone - both materials are dishwasher-safe. A 120 mm-long stainless steel wire cable is included for hanging up the feeding station. The typically innovative design of the tube by Eva Solo is an ideal complement to Eva Solo’s large outdoor range. Photo Courtesy of Connox

Related Reading: 13 Great Modern Birdhouses


A Cozy A-Frame Lodge in the Catskills Is an Ideal Weekend Getaway

Permalink - Posted on 2019-03-12 18:08

Built in 1962 as a modern escape for city dwellers, the Woodhouse Lodge in the Catskills is perfect for a weekend upstate.

The entryway to the Woodhouse Lodge.

The Woodhouse Lodge, which was recently renovated by New York–based interior designer Megan Pflug, is a "modern meets rural" lodge in Greenville, New York. Pflug, who studied fine art at RISD and now runs a design firm, relocated from Brooklyn to Greenville to open the lodge. She wanted to make the move upstate, and she found the perfect opportunity with this lodge.

The 10-room hotel is a combination of midcentury modern with a classic, historic feel. Pflug describes her decorating style as mixing modern items with antiques to create a space that feels natural rather than overly decorated.

The lodge has a new front patio with plenty of seating.

The lodge has a new front patio with plenty of seating. 

Courtesy of The Woodhouse Lodge

The first floor of the A-frame lodge is a common space with an open kitchen and lounge area with a fireplace. Pflug considers the kitchen to be the centerpiece of the hotel and she spent much of her time working on modernizing the space. 

The newly renovated kitchen has soapstone countertops and a white ceiling.

The newly renovated kitchen has soapstone countertops and a white ceiling. 

Courtesy of The Woodhouse Lodge

The lounge has clay plaster walls to create a simple and timeless feel.

The lounge has clay plaster walls to create a simple and timeless feel.

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Pflug decorated the lodge with a variety of vintage pieces. She wanted to honor the midcentury modern style while mixing it up.

Pflug used shaker rails in most of the rooms to honor the traditional nature of the lodge.

Pflug used shaker rails in most of the rooms to honor the traditional nature of the lodge.

Courtesy of The Woodhouse Lodge

The lodge has plenty of fine details that give the space a relaxed atmosphere.

The lodge has plenty of fine details that give the space a relaxed atmosphere.

Courtesy of The Woodhouse Lodge

Shop the Look

Vipp Side Table

The Vipp side table is a small, versatile table for the living room or bedroom. Designed with three legs, the Vipp side table fits right in whether placed next to the couch, lounge chair or bed.

Fellow Big Jo' Set of 2 Mugs

A sleek, refined and functional vessel for your morning cup o' joe. Enjoy these double-walled, ceramic and copper mugs that will keep your hands warm and your drink piping hot. Available in your choice of black or white matte finish, and copper or stainless steel bottoms. 12, 8, and 2 fl. oz. capacities available. Sold in 2-sets, for you and a friend. Photo Courtesy of Huckberry

Coyuchi Tahoe Wool Blanket

One of nature’s best insulating layers, wool regulates your body’s temperature for a comfortable night’s sleep. Made with 100% American-grown wool sourced from ranches certified under the Responsible Wool Standard, our incredibly soft Tahoe Wool Blanket is inspired by those that have graced cabins and lodges in America for a century. Photo Courtesy of Coyuchi

All the beds have custom felt and leather headboards and Brooklinen sheets.

All the beds have custom felt and leather headboards and Brooklinen sheets.

Courtesy of The Woodhouse Lodge

Each room has natural bathroom amenities from Village Common.

Each room has natural bathroom amenities from Village Common. 

Courtesy of The Woodhouse Lodge

The lodge used to have a reddish-brown exterior. Pflug modernized the hotel with a blue-black paint from Farrow & Ball.

The lodge used to have a reddish-brown exterior. Pflug modernized the hotel with a blue-black paint from Farrow & Ball. 

Courtesy of The Woodhouse Lodge

Pflug lives with her husband on the second floor of the A-frame.  They are opening up a second space on the property this spring that will be an event space and wine bar.

Pflug lives with her husband on the second floor of the A-frame.  They are opening up a second space on the property this spring that will be an event space and wine bar.

Courtesy of The Woodhouse Lodge


An Energy-Efficient House Revels in Views of a Lush Forest

Permalink - Posted on 2019-03-12 17:36

In a protected Oregon forest, a sustainably minded retreat crafted for a pair of empty nesters connects deeply with nature.

The contemporary home is marked by long horizontal planes and clean lines. Giulietti Schouten Architects crafted it with an eye for timeless design.

Having sent their two grown children off to college, Pedro and Claudia were ready for a change in scenery. Eager to put down new roots in a home that would offer a shorter commute to work and all the comforts of aging in place, the couple purchased a heavily forested 1.2-acre lot in Wildwood, a neighborhood located just minutes from downtown Portland. Next they tapped local firm Giulietti Schouten Architects to design their primarily single-level home.

A true “forested retreat,” the home is accessed via a private entry road through the woods.

A true "forested retreat," the home is accessed via a private entry road through the woods.

David Papazian

"The goal was for a modern open plan, with clean lines—but warm, inviting, and bright with an emphasis on outdoor living throughout the year," the architects explain. "They wanted the new home to be a place to bring the family together, even though the kids would be away most of the year, and to be able to entertain large groups while still having the home comfortable for daily life."

The contemporary home is marked by long horizontal planes and clean lines. Giulietti Schouten Architects crafted it with an eye for timeless design.

The contemporary home is marked by long horizontal planes and clean lines. Giulietti Schouten Architects crafted it with an eye for timeless design.

David Papazian

Yet the beautiful woods that drew the clients to the site also posed major challenges. Located within a protected forest area, the property faced strict regulations that dictated the building location and footprint. Moreover, the lot to the south had been donated as an environmental and watershed preserve, and came with its own set of rules.

“Great care was taken to preserve all fir and maple trees on the site and to compliment the new landscaped areas to highlight the natural setting,” the architects note of their site-sensitive approach.

"Great care was taken to preserve all fir and maple trees on the site and to compliment the new landscaped areas to highlight the natural setting," the architects note of their site-sensitive approach.

David Papazian

As a result, great care was taken to preserve the existing trees and to funnel the home’s stormwater runoff into a stormwater basin, shared with neighboring properties, which ultimately drains back into the local watershed.

A view of the outdoor walkway that connects the patio to the master bedroom. The exterior is clad in traditional stucco and tongue-and-groove vertical cedar siding.

A view of the outdoor walkway that connects the patio to the master bedroom. The exterior is clad in traditional stucco and tongue-and-groove vertical cedar siding.

David Papazian

In addition to reduced site impact and responsible stormwater management, the architects also took an environmentally friendly design approach to the home. With numerous insulated windows, 100 percent LED lighting, and a building envelope with insulation levels above and beyond code minimums, the Wildwood House has achieved an Oregon energy performance score of 109.

The entry leads directly to the open-plan kitchen, dining area, and living room, where full-height sliding doors extend the living spaces to the outdoors.

The entry leads directly to the open-plan kitchen, dining area, and living room, where full-height sliding doors extend the living spaces to the outdoors.

David Papazian

A waterfall-edge quartz-topped island creates a dramatic statement in the minimalist kitchen. A window cutout behind the sink overlooks forest views to the west.

A waterfall-edge quartz-topped island creates a dramatic statement in the minimalist kitchen. A window cutout behind the sink overlooks forest views to the west.

David Papazian

The sleek kitchen is fitted with a Miele dishwasher, Miele oven, Wolf Cooktop, and Sub-Zero refrigerator. The cabinetry is white oak.

The sleek kitchen is fitted with a Miele dishwasher, Miele oven, Wolf Cooktop, and Sub-Zero refrigerator. The cabinetry is white oak.

David Papazian

An abundance of clerestory windows and sliding glass doors flood the long and linear home with natural light during the day—and they're also strategically placed to take full advantage of the lush, forested surroundings. Outdoor terraces extend the living areas out to the landscape and are protected with large overhangs to allow for year-round use, even in the rainy season.

Indoor/outdoor living is emphasized throughout the design. Pictured is the protected terrace with Restoration Hardware seating, a Marbella Metal Rectangular table, and acid-washed concrete flooring.

Indoor/outdoor living is emphasized throughout the design. Pictured is the protected terrace with Restoration Hardware seating, a Marbella Metal Rectangular table, and acid-washed concrete flooring.

David Papazian

Along with the walls of glass, the interior's warm wood surfaces and clean lines also pull the outdoors in. Open-plan spaces ensure continuous sight lines with the outdoors while providing plenty of space for entertaining.

Mosa porcelain tile clads the central hearth in the living room, which is furnished with a Como sectional chaise by Giorgio Soressi from Design Within Reach and a Noomi swivel chair designed by Susanne Soresso.

Mosa porcelain tile clads the central hearth in the living room, which is furnished with a Como sectional chaise by Giorgio Soressi from Design Within Reach and a Noomi swivel chair designed by Susanne Soresso.

David Papazian

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Hans J. Wegner Easy Chair

“A chair is to have no backside,” said Hans J. Wegner. “It should be beautiful from all sides and angles.” Sculptural and balanced, his Easy Chair (1950) embodies this maxim, a classic example of the “organic functionalism” for which he is famous. Its natural elegance is exemplified by the paper cord that creates the seat and back – more than 1300 feet of cord is used on each chair. Handwoven by a skilled craftsperson, it’s a process that takes eight to 10 hours. The solid oak frame has fluid lines and exacting joinery, which is expertly assembled and requires no hardware. Relaxed and intuitively ergonomic, the Easy Chair is just that – a seat that can easily blend with modern or traditional interiors, in nearly any room in the house. Made in Denmark.

Pablo Designs Clamp Series

Two basic elements—wood and light—come together in an artful composition designed for versatility and portability. "Understated beauty and an uncompromising level of utility are key to the Pablo design philosophy," says designer Dana Cannam. "The opportunity to extend that sensitivity to a material as essential as wood was a natural transition." In the Clamp series, the natural and technological work together, as the North American hardwood holds a slim, energy-efficient LED light source. The lamp arm rotates 360 degrees and allows a height adjustment of up to 24 inches. The Clamp Lamp, which uses a compression fit clamp system, attaches to various table thicknesses and is also available in freestanding, floor, and mini models. Photo: Courtesy of Pablo Designs

Craft Mortar & Pestle

Featuring an elegant and modern design, the Craft Mortar & Pestle created by Simon Legald for Normann Copenhagen takes a simple kitchen accessory to another level of refinement. The two natural materials provide a play on colors and textures, while the minimalist design brings a Scandinavian aesthetic into modern interiors. Made of solid oak, the mortar boasts striking organic patterns, with the marble pestle featuring gray lines on a clean white backdrop. Comfortable to hold, this mortar and pestle is perfect for grounding various kinds of spices and herbs. Thanks to its refined appearance, it will always add style to any décor and claim a place of honor on a table or countertop. A black marble version of this design is also available.

The sculptural stairway is fitted with white oak floating treads, a steel stringer, and a glass guardrail.

The sculptural stairway is fitted with white oak floating treads, a steel stringer, and a glass guardrail.

David Papazian

The small second floor includes two bedroom suites (for the client's visiting children or guests), a lounge, and a covered terrace.

The small second floor includes two bedroom suites (for the client's visiting children or guests), a lounge, and a covered terrace.

David Papazian

"The house accommodates a large number of guests for parties and events, while still being intimate and comfortable in its spaces for daily life with modern, clean lines and a warm interior," the architects said, noting that the primary living and sleeping areas are all located on the main level. "The organization of the program is tailored specifically for the family and the way they live."

Sliding doors in the master bedroom open to an outdoor walkway that connects to the outdoor spa, patio, and garden.

Sliding doors in the master bedroom open to an outdoor walkway that connects to the outdoor spa, patio, and garden.

David Papazian

Mosa porcelain tile lines the bathroom floors. Pictured here is the ground-floor master bath, with massive walls of glass framing forest views.

Mosa porcelain tile lines the bathroom floors. Pictured here is the ground-floor master bath, with massive walls of glass framing forest views.

David Papazian

The master bath includes a Badeloft freestanding tub and Aquabrass fixtures.

The master bath includes a Badeloft freestanding tub and Aquabrass fixtures.

David Papazian

A view from the kitchen to the study on the south side of the house. White oak hardwood floors feature throughout, while the ceiling is tongue-and-groove cedar.

A view from the kitchen to the study on the south side of the house. White oak hardwood floors feature throughout, while the ceiling is tongue-and-groove cedar.

David Papazian

The cozy study is furnished with custom timber shelving, a Gus Modern Jane sectional, a Womb chair, an ottoman designed by Eero Saarinen for Knoll, and a Noguchi table.

The cozy study is furnished with custom timber shelving, a Gus Modern Jane sectional, a Womb chair, an ottoman designed by Eero Saarinen for Knoll, and a Noguchi table.

David Papazian

A peek inside the guest bath next to the entry.

A peek inside the guest bath next to the entry.

David Papazian

Wildwood House floor plans
Wildwood House sections
Wildwood House site plan

Related Reading: 10 Outstanding Prefabs in the Pacific Northwest

Project Credits:

Architect of Record: Giulietti Schouten Architects / @gs_architects

Builder/ General Contractor: WA Hughes Construction

Structural Engineer: Madden & Baughman Engineering

Civil Engineer: NW Engineers

Landscape Design Company: Dennis' 7 Dees

Cabinetry Design/ Installation: L & Z Specialties

Windows/Doors: Portland Millwork Inc.