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Efficient Prefab Panels Form This Southern California Abode

Permalink - Posted on 2018-10-19 20:08

Net-zero prefab panels and Icelandic-inspired design come together in Dawnsknoll, a sustainable home in Santa Monica.

Project Name: Dawnsknoll

Icelandic husband-and-wife duo Erla Dögg Ingjaldsdóttir and Tryggvi Thorsteinsson of the award-winning studio Minarc have built another home with mnmMOD—a prefabricated, panelized building system they developed using a blend of recycled steel and EPS insulation. The resulting 2,500-square-foot home, called Dawnskoll, keeps sustainability at the forefront while playing with color and smart usage of space.

Dawnsknoll optimizes the capture of natural light and cross ventilation, keeping down electrical costs. Interior/exterior courtyards, as well as the master and living room sliders, help circulate breezes. Sustainable heating is also introduced through radiant floor heating and domestic water heating throughout the house.

Dawnsknoll optimizes the capture of natural light and cross ventilation, keeping down electrical costs. Interior/exterior courtyards, as well as the master and living room sliders, help circulate breezes. Sustainable heating is also introduced through radiant floor heating and domestic water heating throughout the house.

Courtesy of Art Gray

Manufactured in Los Angeles, mnmMOD panels are an efficient, durable, and fully customizable building material that yields "net-zero" efficiency, and creates a healthy, mold- and termite-free environment, while also reducing the amount of manpower needed during construction.

Courtesy of Art Gray

"mnmMOD panels incorporate high-quality, off-the-shelf, sustainable materials that have been researched, tested, and selected to meet stringent quality specifications," says Thorsteinsson. "Materials are prefabricated into precisely cut panels at the factory, then flat-packed and delivered to the site where they are assembled."

Colors from dramatic, Icelandic landscapes inspired the contrasting interiors. Volcanic orange creates a multifunctional gathering point at the heart of the home while the swimming pool brings in a lagoon hue; the cabinets recall glaciers and lava. In the kitchen, "disappearing" chairs are stored under the island to maximize space.

Colors from dramatic, Icelandic landscapes inspired the contrasting interiors. Volcanic orange creates a multifunctional gathering point at the heart of the home while the swimming pool brings in a lagoon hue; the cabinets recall glaciers and lava. In the kitchen, "disappearing" chairs are stored under the island to maximize space.

Courtesy of Art Gray

 

Courtesy of Art Gray

The mnmMOD building system was used for the walls, floor panels, and ceiling panels of the house. The interior floors on the first floor are concrete, while flooring for the upper floor is bamboo. Kirei Echopanels were installed in the living room to reduce noise. 

The sink in the powder room was made from recycled tires.

The sink in the powder room was made from recycled tires.

Courtesy of Art Gray

Living Moss wall in powder room created by Minarc.

Minarc created a living moss wall in the powder room.

Courtesy of Art Gray

Minarc made a conscious effort to use only materials in their most organic form, so they avoided carpets and tiles, and used recycled materials as much as possible. 

An outdoor swing bed makes the most of sunny, Santa Monica weather.

An outdoor swing bed makes the most of sunny, Santa Monica weather.

Courtesy of Art Gray

Inspired by the dramatic landscape of Iceland, the design and clever use of color create contrasting interiors that stimulate the senses. 

Courtesy of Art Gray

The orange kitchen island mimics volcanic lava flowing as it cuts across the main space to create a multi-functional communal area in the heart of the home.

A heated patio and fireplace in the outdoor dining area encourages an indoor/outdoor lifestyle, while the river rocks in the exterior courtyard give the outdoor spaces a soothing, Zen-like ambiance. 

A pull-out console provides smart storage in the headboard.

A pull-out console provides smart storage in the headboard.

Courtesy of Art Gray

Dawnsknoll’s exterior sidings are cement panels and Resysta wood. The house’s front gate and garage are made from recycled wood.

Dawnsknoll’s exterior sidings are cement panels and Resysta wood. The house’s front gate and garage are made from recycled wood.

Courtesy of Art Gray

Minarc also designed the Plús Hús, a tiny prefab starting at $37,000.


Project Credits: 

Architecture, interior, lighting, and landscape design: Minarc / @minarcdesign

Builder: mnmMOD Building System; Core Construction 

Structural engineering: CW Howe Partners Inc.


100 Years of Bauhaus: What You Should Know About This Milestone Movement

Permalink - Posted on 2018-10-19 18:22

In celebration of the 100th anniversary of Bauhaus, we delve into its background and profound, lasting legacy on the art and design world.

The year 2019 marks the centenary of Bauhaus, a milestone marked in Germany with a widespread program of events and exhibitions all over the world under the theme "Rethinking the World"—fitting for a movement that sought to "create a new society via art," according to director Walter Gropius.

Get ready for a year of celebrations, and brush up on your 
Bauhaus history below.

Cover photo: Bauhaus band. Photo: unknown, 1930. Bauhaus Archive Berlin.

What Is Bauhaus? 

While Bauhaus may evoke a style to many of us today, it was initially an art school that operated in post-World War I Germany from 1919 to 1933. The school, founded by pioneering architect Walter Gropius, had the then-radical idea to combine craft and the fine arts, developing a curriculum in which all arts, including architecture, would be brought together to form a "total" work of art—in German, Gesamtkunstwerk

Bauhaus Dessau, completed in 1925 and designed by Walter Gropius.

Bauhaus Dessau, completed in 1925 and designed by Walter Gropius.

© Nate Robert via Flickr Licença CC BY-SA 2.0

In many ways, the Bauhaus was in reaction to the increased separation between manufacturing and individuality, production and the hand that created it. Bauhaus sought to unite craft and creation again, through both practical skills and theoretical knowledge, and immersed its students in the Bauhaus ideology. Bauhaus—the name itself meaning "building house" or "School of Building"—was originally located in the German city of Weimar from 1919, and then moved to Dessau in 1925, and finally to Berlin in 1932. 

Walter Gropius and the University of Baghdad. 1967. Harvard Art Museum / Busch-Reisinger Museum, Gift of Ise Gropius.

Walter Gropius and the University of Baghdad, 1967. 

Harvard Art Museum / Busch-Reisinger Museum, Gift of Ise Gropius

Students in the school came from diverse ethnic and social backgrounds (this would later, in part, lead to its closing and dissemination), and began their studies with classes on materials, color theory, and formal and graphic relationships before delving into more specialized studies in metalworking, cabinet and furniture making, weaving, pottery, typography, wall painting, and after 1927, architecture. 

As the political situation in Germany became increasingly unstable in the 1930s, the school began to suffer from both financial and ideological difficulties. In 1932, after the school moved to Berlin, local elections brought the Nazis to power, and the school was shuttered in 1933. After its closure, many of the left-leaning key figures of the school, both students and teachers, emigrated to the United States and other countries, bringing their aesthetics and ideas with them. 

Who Are the Major Figures in Bauhaus?

The list of major players in the Bauhaus reads almost like a who’s who of early modern art and architecture. Walter Gropius founded the school in 1919 and designed the school’s new building at Dessau in 1925; he remained at its helm until stepping down in 1928. Gropius was succeeded by Swiss architect Hannes Meyer, who had initially been appointed to the school’s first architecture workshop in 1927; however, Meyer was ousted by the local government in 1930 for being too left wing, and was subsequently replaced by German architect Ludwig Mies van der Rohe. 

Students and faculty of the Bauhaus on the beach, 1926-1927. Irene Bayer or Marianne Brandt, 1926-27. Bauhaus Archive Berlin.

Students and faculty of the Bauhaus on the beach, 1926-1927.

Irene Bayer or Marianne Brandt, 1926-27. Bauhaus Archive Berlin.

Faculty at the school were equally famous in their fields: artists and designers Johannes Itten, Lyonel Feininger, and Gerhard Marcks were early appointments to the school. Artists Paul Klee, Vasily Kandinsky, and Josef Albers often taught the preliminary course including color theory; László Moholy-Nagy, Georg Muche, and Oskar Schlemmer also taught courses. By the 1920s, Marcel Breuer directed the cabinetmaking workshop; Gunta Stölzl, the textile workshop; and graphic designer Herbert Bayer, the typography workshop. Under Mies, Lilly Reich directed the interior design workshop.

With over 490 colorful half-timbered houses, the town of Celle, Germany, is considered one of the largest compact groupings of buildings that was designed using Bauhaus principles. © Celle Tourismus und Marketing GmbH

With over 490 colorful half-timbered houses, the town of Celle, Germany, is considered one of the largest compact groupings of buildings that was designed using Bauhaus principles.  

© Celle Tourismus und Marketing GmbH

Key students of the Bauhaus included textile artist Anni Albers; designers Marianne Brandt (who would later run the metalworking studio), Wilhelm Wagenfeld, and Christian Dell; photographer Gertrud Arndt; architect and designer Hilde Reiss; and several other artists, designers, and architects. 

What Are the Most Famous Bauhaus Works? 

Some of the most significant works of the Bauhaus include not only the Dessau school building itself—which employed Bauhaus theories—but also the very items that were conceived of and then executed within its walls. Gropius’ complex for the Dessau location is today known as a key example of modern, functionalist design with steel framing, concrete bricks, and a glass curtain wall. 

The Wassily Chair by Marcel Breuer, designed in 1925 and partially inspired by his interest in the tubular components of his bicycle.

The Wassily Chair by Marcel Breuer, designed in 1925 and partially inspired by his interest in the tubular components of his bicycle.

Image courtesy the Museum of Modern Art.

Equally important were the chair designs by Marcel Breuer, including the Club Chair (designed in 1925), also known as Model B3 or The Wassily Chair, and the Cesca (1928), his cantilevered steel chair. Other important designs include the typeface Universal Bayer (1925) by Herbert Bayer; a teapot, Model No. MT 49 (1927), by Marianne Brandt; the Bauhaus Door Knob by Walter Gropius; the iconic Bauhaus Lamp by William Wagenfeld; and many of painter Josef Albers’ early studies on form and color. 

Coffee and tea set by Marianne Brandt. Image courtesy the Museum of Modern Art.

A coffee and tea set by Marianne Brandt, who was a German painter, sculptor, photographer, and designer who became the head of the metal workshop at the Bauhaus in 1928. 

Image courtesy the Museum of Modern Art.

What Impact Does Bauhaus Have Today?

It’s hard to overstate the impact of the Bauhaus on the world of design, and its legacy is as deep as it is complex—in part because after the closing of the school, its students and faculty dispersed around the globe, disseminating their designs, techniques, and ideas all over.

Gropius House, Walter Gropius, 1938, Lincoln, Massachusetts.

When Bauhaus founder Walter Gropius moved to the United States, he settled in Lincoln, Massachusetts, where he built his family home. The house is modest in scale yet revolutionary in impact, embodying the Bauhaus principles of simplicity, economy, and restrained beauty. It combines traditional elements of New England architecture—wood, brick, and fieldstone—with innovative materials rarely used in domestic settings at that time, including glass block, acoustic plaster, chrome banisters, and the latest technology in fixtures. The house is recognized as a National Historic Landmark for its influence in bringing international modernism to the United States. A Getty grant will support the development of a conservation management plan for the building and site, to ensure the preservation of its characteristic features for the home’s continued use as a teaching tool to transmit the tenets of Bauhaus design. Grant support: $75,000

The Gropius House in Lincoln, Massachusetts, designed by Walter Gropius in 1938 after his arrival in the United States.

Courtesy of Historic New England

For example, many key figures moved to the United States, where they taught at worked across the country. Breuer and Gropius taught at Harvard and produced students such as Philip Johnson, I.M. Pei, Lawrence Halprin, and Paul Rudolph. Mies designed the campus and taught at the Illinois Institute of Technology; Josef and Anni Albers taught at Black Mountain College and Josef later at Yale; Moholy-Nagy established the New Bauhaus in Chicago. Each educational institution in turn taught more students, ultimately having a critical impact on design education. 

"Knot 2," Anni Albers, 1947. Both Anni and Josef Albers pushed students to consider how line, color, and form could communicate ideas to the viewer, and pursued these concepts in their own work.

Furthermore, former students Arieh Sharon, Shmuel Mestechkin, Munio Gitai-Weinraub, and Shlomo Bernstein lived in Israel and helped disseminate Bauhaus ideals and designs throughout the country, resulting in the construction of thousands of "Bauhaus Style" buildings in Tel Aviv that are today referred to as the White City. In Australia, the Shillito Design School, established in the 1960s, was firmly grounded in the ideological and theoretical precepts put forward by the Bauhaus in the 1920s and 1930s.

Originally designed as two separate apartment buildings in 1925, The Norman hotel brings them together: one half features Renaissance and oriental influences, while the other is a clean-lined, modernist structure.

Tel Aviv is home to one of the largest neighborhoods of Bauhaus architecture, known as the White City. This building, The Norman Hotel in Tel Aviv, was originally designed as two separate apartment buildings in 1925: one half features Renaissance and oriental influences, while the other is a clean-lined, modernist structure reflective of Bauhaus design.

Amit Giron

Together, these institutions and individuals helped change the face of modern art, architecture, graphic design, interior design, typography, and industrial design for decades to come.  

Follow along with 100 Years of Bauhaus.


A Monochromatic Palette Unifies Old and New in This Ukrainian Bachelor Pad

Permalink - Posted on 2018-10-19 17:46

Period elements combine with contemporary finishings in this old-meets-new renovation.

When Kiev–based architect Slava Balbek and interior designers Evgeniya Dubrovskaya and Artem Beregnoy first visited this two-story apartment in a heritage building in Kiev, Ukraine, they discovered beautiful original brickwork hidden under layers of plaster, an atmospheric attic with sloped walls, and old timber ceiling joists. Per the request of their client—a sophisticated, young bachelor—to preserve yet thoughtfully modernize, the historically significant structure, the team worked to retain, restore, and repurpose as many of the apartment’s original features as possible. 

Buble Blob sofa, Duke coffee table, and black leather Pelle Plus chair by Arketipo.

Buble Blob sofa, Duke coffee table, and black leather Pelle Plus chair by Arketipo.

Courtesy of Andrey Bezuglov and Yevhenii Avramenko

"Finding the right balance between the old and the modern, while preserving the integrity of the entire space was our first challenge," notes Balbek. 

A peek at the architect and designers assessing the original apartment.

A peek at the architect and designers assessing the original apartment.

Courtesy of Slava Balbek

Jaipur Zinfandel carpet.

Jaipur Zinfandel carpet.

Courtesy of Andrey Bezuglov and Yevhenii Avramenko

Luce Plan Counterbalance floor lamp and Ditre Italia sofa.

Luce Plan Counterbalance floor lamp and Ditre Italia sofa.

Courtesy of Andrey Bezuglov and Yevhenii Avramenko

The team avoided loud colors, and instead unified the contemporary and historical details with a monochromatic palette throughout the home. They restored the old brickwork and metal beams, and also cleaned and lacquered the timber joists.

Frattino table by Miniforms.

Frattino table by Miniforms.

Courtesy of Andrey Bezuglov and Yevhenii Avramenko

Dining chairs by Billani W.

Dining chairs by Billani W.

Courtesy of Andrey Bezuglov and Yevhenii Avramenko

In the areas that were significantly damaged, they carefully selected replacement bricks for the walls, as well as scuncheons that were made around the same time as the building. 

Keys Cucine kitchen cabinets and countertop.

Keys Cucine kitchen cabinets and countertop.

Courtesy of Andrey Bezuglov and Yevhenii Avramenko

"To even out the scuncheon and window lintel, we expanded the keystone and filled out the scuncheon with newly found bricks," says Balbek.

Woo Furniture bar stools.

Woo Furniture bar stools.

Courtesy of Andrey Bezuglov and Yevhenii Avramenko

The warm brick walls on the ground level now create a natural, almost rustic canvas, where the original historical features—such as the existing stucco and corner chimney—blend together harmoniously with the modern furniture and white wall-panels.

Artwork by Ukrainian artist Artem Prut.

Artwork by Ukrainian artist Artem Prut.

Courtesy of Andrey Bezuglov and Yevhenii Avramenko

On the lower floor, white wall-panels unify and brighten the open-plan living areas, yet on the attic level, the panels are used to straighten the sloping walls.  

The living room connects to a small balcony.

The living room connects to a small balcony.

Courtesy of Andrey Bezuglov and Yevhenii Avramenko

Serenzo oak flooring.

Serenzo oak flooring.

Courtesy of Andrey Bezuglov and Yevhenii Avramenko

On the attic floor, built-in window blinds are hidden within the paneled walls to keep the space neat and streamlined. 

Though devoid of period ornamentation, the attic loft follows the same monochromatic palette and feels like a natural extension of the ground floor.

Though devoid of period ornamentation, the attic loft follows the same monochromatic palette and feels like a natural extension of the ground floor.

Courtesy of Andrey Bezuglov and Yevhenii Avramenko

A hand-assembled metal staircase leads up to the attic floor.

A hand-assembled metal staircase leads up to the attic floor.

Courtesy of Andrey Bezuglov and Yevhenii Avramenko

The open-plan lower level includes the kitchen and dining area, a large living lounge with a film projector, a walk-in closet, a pantry, and a bathroom, which is contained within a thick, soundproof walled box.

The glass dividers in the bathroom are hand-crafted by Ukrainian craftsmen.

The glass dividers in the bathroom are hand-crafted by Ukrainian craftsmen.

Courtesy of Andrey Bezuglov and Yevhenii Avramenko

Tres bathroom accesories.

Tres bathroom accesories.

Courtesy of Andrey Bezuglov and Yevhenii Avramenko

The upper floor is divided into three zones: a master bedroom with an ensuite bathroom, a study, and large walk-in closet; a guest bedroom with an ensuite; and a laundry room.

Artwork by Ukrainian artist Bohdan Burenko, and Artemide bedside lamps in the bedroom.

Artwork by Ukrainian artist Bohdan Burenko, and Artemide bedside lamps in the bedroom.

Courtesy of Andrey Bezuglov and Yevhenii Avramenko

“Walking through the apartment, one cannot help but notice the vibrancy of muted tones reflected in the harmony of distinct textures,” says Balbek.

"Walking through the apartment, one cannot help but notice the vibrancy of muted tones reflected in the harmony of distinct textures," says Balbek.  

Courtesy of Andrey Bezuglov and Yevhenii Avramenko

"We wanted to come up with innovative, architectural solutions that would sustain the passage of time. The apartment is comfortable and inviting, modern and sophisticated, fresh and genuine; it is a place where ‘less is definitely more’," says Balbek.  

Lower floor plan drawing.

Lower floor plan drawing.

Courtesy of Slava Balbek

Attic floor plan drawing.

Attic floor plan drawing.

Courtesy of Slava Balbek

Project Credits:

Architecture: Slava Balbek

Interior design: Evgeniya Dubrovskaya, and Artem Beregnoy

Lighting design: Evgeniya Dubrovskaya


Own an Iconic Midcentury in Austin For Just Under $500K

Permalink - Posted on 2018-10-19 17:07

Recognized as a National Historic Landmark, this second unit in an architecturally significant triplex features 858 square feet of midcentury charm.

The east side of the living space opens up to a spectacular double-story wall of glass framed by vertical wood mullions and horizontal aluminum H-channels. A six-foot roof overhang protects the glazing from solar gain.

Having worked under Richard Neutra and Rudolph Schindler, modernist architect Harwell Hamilton Harris pioneered California Modern style across the nation, including in Austin, Texas.

There, nestled in a leafy neighborhood eight blocks from the University of Texas at Austin, sits the Cranfill-Beacham Apartments, a triplex of loft apartments considered one of Harris’ best works, which has also been recognized as a Historic Landmark at the local, state, and national level.

Hidden behind a 1930s bungalow on a remote street, the entrance to the Cranfill-Beacham Apartments is marked by a redwood pergola.

Hidden behind a 1930s bungalow on a remote street, the entrance to the Cranfill-Beacham Apartments is marked by a redwood pergola.

Andrea Calo/ Calo Photographic

English professor and art collector Thomas Cranfill commissioned the project in 1958 as an investment and to house his partner, respected photographer Hans Beacham, who had lived in the third unit until his death in 2004. Cranfill had lived next door in a landmark-status home, also designed by Harris during the architect’s term as The University of Texas at Austin’s first Dean of Architecture.

A massive oak tree is the focal point of the entry courtyard. The entrances to each unit are sheltered beneath the overhanging second-story balcony.

A massive oak tree is the focal point of the entry courtyard. The entrances to each unit are sheltered beneath the overhanging second-story balcony. 

Andrea Calo/ Calo Photographic

Harris designed Cranfill’s house and the apartments using California Modernist principles adapted to Austin’s climate and environment.

Board-and-batten redwood siding—Harris originally wanted to use Texas cypress, but defaulted to California redwood due to sourcing delays—clad the upper portion of the triplex, while the ground floor was constructed from concrete masonry blocks.

Exterior materials are repeated in the interior, from the board-and-batten redwood siding to the concrete masonry walls.

Exterior materials are repeated in the interior, from the board-and-batten redwood siding to the concrete masonry walls.

Andrea Calo/ Calo Photographic

New cork floors replaced the original carpet in the second unit.

New cork floors replaced the original carpet in the second unit.

Andrea Calo/ Calo Photographic

The one-bedroom, one-bath apartments champion modular grid concepts, modest living, and strong connections with nature.

Located above the kitchen and dining area, the loft bedroom includes a walk-in closet, bathroom, and access to the second-floor balcony, which is framed by full-height glazing.

Located above the kitchen and dining area, the loft bedroom includes a walk-in closet, bathroom, and access to the second-floor balcony, which is framed by full-height glazing.

Andrea Calo/ Calo Photographic

The second-floor balcony on the west side overlooks views of the majestic live oak.

The second-floor balcony on the west side overlooks views of the majestic live oak.

Andrea Calo/ Calo Photographic

Modest in size, the Cranfill-Beacham Apartments make up for small square footage with big views. Inside, a stunning scene reveals itself in the rear facade where double-story glazing and louvered glass doors create a seamless connection for indoor/outdoor living.

The east side of the living space opens up to a spectacular double-story wall of glass framed by vertical wood mullions and horizontal aluminum H-channels. A six-foot roof overhang protects the glazing from solar gain.

The east side of the living space opens up to a spectacular double-story wall of glass framed by vertical wood mullions and horizontal aluminum H-channels. A six-foot roof overhang protects the glazing from solar gain.

Andrea Calo/ Calo Photographic

Surrounded by tall elms and thick bamboo, the rear garden is a private oasis.

Surrounded by tall elms and thick bamboo, the rear garden is a private oasis.

Andrea Calo/ Calo Photographic

After Beacham’s death in 1995, much effort was made to save the homes from demolition. Architects Ernesto Cragnolino and Krista Whitson spearheaded the effort to sensitively update the building to modern standards while securing landmark status.

This one-bedroom, one-bath unit retains its original paint colors. All three apartments share a similar plan, however, the third apartment has slight variations as it was tailored to Hans Beacham's needs.

This one-bedroom, one-bath unit retains its original paint colors. All three apartments share a similar plan, however, the third apartment has slight variations as it was tailored to Hans Beacham's needs.

Andrea Calo/ Calo Photographic

The kitchen features original ergonomic cabinetry, trim work, and recessed lighting.

The kitchen features original ergonomic cabinetry, trim work, and recessed lighting.

Andrea Calo/ Calo Photographic

All three units still have their original cooktops and ovens. A dishwasher (not pictured) was a new addition.

All three units still have their original cooktops and ovens. A dishwasher (not pictured) was a new addition.

Andrea Calo/ Calo Photographic

Thoughtfully modernized without compromising Harris’ vision, the three units in the Cranfill-Beacham Apartments have been mostly occupied by architects and midcentury-modern design aficionados.

Guardrail-high bookcases provide storage and a sense of enclosure from the living area below.

Guardrail-high bookcases provide storage and a sense of enclosure from the living area below.

Andrea Calo/ Calo Photographic

The L-shaped bedroom accommodates a private workspace around the corner.

The L-shaped bedroom accommodates a private workspace around the corner.

Andrea Calo/ Calo Photographic

The bathroom was updated with new flooring and plumbing fixtures.

The bathroom was updated with new flooring and plumbing fixtures.

Andrea Calo/ Calo Photographic

1911 Cliff Street, No. 2, Austin, TX is now being listed by Brian Linder of The Value of Architecture for $495,000. See the full listing here.  

Know of a home for sale or rent that should be featured on Dwell.com? Here's how to get in touch


Top 5 Homes of the Week That Are Even Hotter Than Their Desert Locations

Permalink - Posted on 2018-10-19 16:16

These modern desert homes match their locations with equally impressive design. Take a peek at our editor's favorite homes this week from the Dwell community that crank up the heat.

Featured homes were submitted by members of the Dwell community through our Add a Home feature. Add your home to Dwell.com/homes today.

1. Desert Wing

Architect: Kendle Design Collaborative, Location: Scottsdale, Arizona

From the architect: "Materials are chosen not just for their inherent beauty and low maintenance, but for their indigenous qualities as well. Copper, mined in the Arizona desert, clad bold roof forms, which appear to float above indoor and outdoor living spaces. Rammed-earth walls made of soil excavated from the site rise up from the desert floor, echoing the forms of the surrounding mountain range. The result is a home that is truly in harmony with its site and is expressive of its unique place in the world."

Photo by Rick Brazil


2. Modern Meets Boho

Landscape design firm: BOXHILL, Location: Tucson, Arizona

From the principal designer: "We gave the landscape surrounding this midcentury-modern home a complete face-lift, replacing what was once all gravel and concrete with a dynamic landscape, studded with desert plants and with many areas to kick back and relax. The design brings the outdoors in with living-room windows that look out onto specimen cactus, inviting seating areas, and views to the Sonoran desert. In the backyard, we remodeled the existing pool, adding a shallow, wadding area for lounging while partially submerged in the water, and adding multiple areas for seating, such as hanging day-beds from the covered porch and an area for outdoor dining."

Photo by G Vargas


3. The Modern Taos House

House design: Sustainable Builders, Location: El Prado, New Mexico

From the project uploader: "The Taos Modern House features The Rio Grande Del Norte National Monument as your own personal backyard and the Sangre De Cristo Mountain as your playground."

Photo by Lucero Molina


4. The Wheelhouse

Location: Twentynine Palms, California

From the project uploader: "Set within a vast spread of almost 80 acres, the property is adjacent to Joshua Tree National Park, with spectacular uninterrupted views of the desert and mountains. Currently owned by an artist, the light-filled living spaces are dotted with his own creations, including a triptych on plywood, a unique wood-based tripod lamp, and a sunset-hued tree light amidst classic designs by Eames."

Photo: BoutiqueHomes


5. JT1 Cabin

Builders: Goodpaster Development and Baltic Sands Inc., Location: Joshua Tree, California

From the photographer: "Inspired by the homestead cabins synonymous with Joshua Tree, this modern, completely off-grid cabin is a unique offering for the area. Set on 5 acres of pristine desert, this cabin stands walking distance from the Joshua Tree National Park boundary, the unmistakable boulders, and boasts 360-degree desert views. High ceilings and windows work together to showcase the natural beauty of the Mojave and allow the desert to be an extension of every room, including the bathrooms, making style and breathtaking wilderness seamlessly interconnected." 

Interior & exterior worlds merge at JT1 Cabin to create the ultimate desert living experience

Interior & exterior worlds merge at JT1 Cabin to create the ultimate desert living experience

Photo: Ida Alwin


Want a chance to be featured? Add your home here!


Ku' Damm 101

Permalink - Posted on 2018-10-19 15:52

Who wouldn’t prefer to start a city discovery tour fully relaxed? Lifestyle hotel Ku' Damm 101 is a unique experience itself. This ranges from the lobby specially designed as a play zone for our guests, to our customised rooms and hallways, and our naturally lit breakfast area on the top floor. The combination of organic shapes, natural materials, colour schemes from Le Corbusier, and our soothing lighting contribute to the overall experience. Text Courtesy of Ku' Damm 101


New Jersey’s Oldest and Largest Frank Lloyd Wright House Cuts Price to $1.45M

Permalink - Posted on 2018-10-18 20:27

James B. Christie House—the first of only four Wright-designed residences in the Garden State—slashes its price to entice buyers.

The view of the house seen from the driveway. To the left is the workshop and wood shed connected to the carport by a trellis.

Designed in 1940, this handsome Frank Lloyd Wright house bears the iconic hallmarks of Usonian design with its low-slung form, strong connection with the outdoors, and reliance on native materials including brick, cypress, and redwood throughout.

Set far back on a wooded 7.2-acre property in Bernardsville, New Jersey, the James B. Christie House takes advantage of its private location with ample glazing.

Set far back on a wooded 7.2-acre property in Bernardsville, New Jersey, the James B. Christie House takes advantage of its private location with ample glazing.

via Weichert Realtors

Known as the James B. Christie House and Shop, the residence had been in possession of its eponymous owner for only half a decade before it was sold to Sultan Amerie, a government official from Iran who lived there with his family for 40 years.

The view of the house seen from the driveway. To the left is the workshop and wood shed connected to the carport by a trellis.

The view of the house seen from the driveway. To the left is the workshop and wood shed connected to the carport by a trellis.

via Weichert Realtors

The single-story, Usonian house was based off a two-by-four-foot grid that informed the 2,000-square-foot, L-shaped plan. 

The living room and dining area features original built-in seating, tables, and chairs designed by Frank Lloyd Wright.

The living room and dining area features original built-in seating, tables, and chairs designed by Frank Lloyd Wright.

via Weichert Realtors

Full-height glazed doors flood the interior with natural light and open up to an outdoor brick terrace.

Full-height glazed doors flood the interior with natural light and open up to an outdoor brick terrace.

via Weichert Realtors

In 2003, New Jersey–based practice and Frank Lloyd Wright preservation specialists Tarantino Architect was hired to add a master bedroom suite extension—a design originally conceived by Wright that was never realized by the original owners.

The master bedroom suite realized by Tarantino Architect opens up to an enclosed brick patio.

The master bedroom suite realized by Tarantino Architect opens up to an enclosed brick patio.

via Weichert Realtors

Tarantino Architect's extension includes a heightened clerestory lounge with built-in seating. Great care was taken to match the original materials and details.

Tarantino Architect's extension includes a heightened clerestory lounge with built-in seating. Great care was taken to match the original materials and details.

via Weichert Realtors

The master bath includes a double vanity as well as a jacuzzi tub with rain shower.

The master bath includes a double vanity as well as a jacuzzi tub with rain shower.

via Weichert Realtors

The 2,700-square-foot home also includes a two-car garage and a 700-square-foot artist studio with fireplace (not pictured). 

A nighttime view of the home seen from the northeast. To the right is the bedroom wing extending north. To the left is the living room wing stretching to the east.

A nighttime view of the home seen from the northeast. To the right is the bedroom wing extending north. To the left is the living room wing stretching to the east.

via Weichert Realtors

Upgraded with a new roof, systems, windows and baths, the three-bedroom, 3.1-bath property has recently lowered its asking price from $2,200,000 to $1,450,000.

The south side of the living areas are lined with clerestory windows and casement windows. Also pictured is one of two fireplaces in the home.

The south side of the living areas are lined with clerestory windows and casement windows. Also pictured is one of two fireplaces in the home.

via Weichert Realtors

Here is the kitchen in the south end of the home next to the dining area.

Here is the kitchen in the south end of the home next to the dining area.

via Weichert Realtors

The loggia connects to a long passageway leading to the bedroom wing with the recent master suite addition at the end.

The loggia connects to a long passageway leading to the bedroom wing with the recent master suite addition at the end.

via Weichert Realtors

A second bedroom originally used as the master before Tarantino Architect's extension was built.

Here is the second bedroom that had been originally used as the master before Tarantino Architect's extension was built.

via Weichert Realtors

190 Jockey Hollow Rd, Bernardsville, NJ is now being listed by Weichert Realtors for $1,450,000. See the full listing here.

Know of a home for sale or rent that should be featured on Dwell.com? Here's how to get in touch.


A Grass-Topped Addition in England Connects Home and Garden

Permalink - Posted on 2018-10-18 20:04

A gray, brick extension and garden studio helps Oatlands in Surrey open up to a previously disconnected landscape.

To improve connectivity to the rear garden, Soup Architects stretched a new ground floor extension across the width of the side to open up the eastern section of the house. A living room further knits the residence with the green space.

Winner of two 2018 RIBA awards, Oatlands by Soup Architects is a 1920s suburban home in Surrey, a county bordering London in Southeast England. Gracefully updated with a new, modern rear extension that expands the interior living spaces, the residence spills out to a landscaped garden.

The original property—a two-story, semi-detached house in a private estate in Weybridge—had undergone several minor renovations over the years, and includes 115 feet of hidden garden that curves around a corner to form a private oasis surrounded by mature pines and oaks. It was set on a long, north-south axis, but poorly connected to the rear garden. The architects realized they could use the green space to their advantage when renovating the existing three-bedroom house.

Before: the facade

Before: the facade

Courtesy of SOUP Architects

Before: the rear garden

Before: the rear garden

Courtesy of SOUP Architects

The new garden studio is positioned at the point where the garden pivots off to a previously disconnected end of the outdoor space.   

To improve connectivity to the rear garden, Soup Architects stretched a new ground floor extension across the width of the side to open up the eastern section of the house. A living room further knits the residence with the green space.

To improve connectivity to the rear garden, Soup Architects stretched a new ground floor extension across the width of the side to open up the eastern section of the house. A living room further knits the residence with the green space.

Courtesy of Andy Matthews

Soup Architects enlarged the first floor of the house to include a new master bedroom, as well as a dressing and bathroom area. The usable floor area increased to 2,842 square feet.

A wedge-shaped skylight allows natural light to suffuse the interiors. The architects preserved a palette of dark, natural materials on the ground floor.

A wedge-shaped skylight allows natural light to suffuse the interiors. The architects preserved a palette of dark, natural materials on the ground floor.

Courtesy of Andy Matthews

The new garden studio, seen through the window, is positioned at the point where the garden pivots off to a previously disconnected end of the outdoor space.

The new garden studio, seen through the window, is positioned at the point where the garden pivots off to a previously disconnected end of the outdoor space.

Courtesy of Andy Matthews

From the existing ground floor building, one can glimpse into the new, sunlit extension that’s composed of contrasting light gray, exposed brickwork, white-washed walls, and full-height glazing.

"The use of sliding screens and secret panel doors allows for a free-flowing circulation route between all areas of the ground floor," says Patrick Walls, a director at Soup, "including the refurbished garage and boot-room, and a large wedge-shaped rooflight allows for subtle natural light variations throughout the day in the new extension."

Generous glazing mimics the experience of dining outdoors.

Generous glazing mimics the experience of dining outdoors.

Courtesy of Andy Matthews

"As you proceed through the circulation corridor towards the new extension, the space opens out to reveal a wonderfully light, open-plan space with unobstructed views out into the angled garden," he continues.

Courtesy of Andy Matthews

"Its geometry is strongly connected to the new extension and creates a harmonious connection between the two structures," says Walls. 

Soup Architects built a new, stand-alone work studio in the lower section of the garden to provide a different orientation and perspective to the main house.

Soup Architects built a new, stand-alone work studio in the lower section of the garden to provide a different orientation and perspective to the main house.

Courtesy of Andy Matthews

The facade of the new extension is comprised of exposed light gray brickwork with a natural lime mortar, and a light, aluminum-framed glazing system. 

A children's playroom on the ground floor.

A children's playroom on the ground floor.

Courtesy of Andy Matthews

At the heart of the extension is a new kitchen and dining area.

At the heart of the extension is a new kitchen and dining area. 

Courtesy of Andy Matthews

Adjacent to the kitchen and dining zone is a study, and a spacious living area with a custom-designed reading nook that stretches out into the garden.

The first floor extension contains the master bedroom and dressing and bathroom area.

The first floor extension contains the master bedroom and dressing and bathroom area.

Courtesy of Andy Matthews

All the bedrooms and bathrooms are located on the first floor.

All the bedrooms and bathrooms are located on the first floor. 

Courtesy of Andy Matthews

The house is located on a site flanked by two other 1920s brick buildings with elongated, north-facing gardens that are about 131 feet deep. 

Part of the house was retained, the thermal fabric was upgraded, and circulation was improved with a more fluid, compact floor plan.

Part of the house was retained, the thermal fabric was upgraded, and circulation was improved with a more fluid, compact floor plan.

Courtesy of Andy Matthews

Site plan

Oatlands site plan

Courtesy of SOUP Architects

Ground floor plan

Oatlands ground floor plan

Courtesy of SOUP Architects

First floor plan

Oatlands first floor plan

Courtesy of SOUP Architects


Project Credits: 

 Architecture, interior and lighting design: Soup Architects  / @souparchitects

Builder: Verve Concepts

Structural engineering: BTA Structural Design 

Landscape design: Rosalind Millar Landscape Design  

Kitchen: Roundhouse


Country Garden House

Permalink - Posted on 2018-10-18 19:15

Situated to be in harmony with its lush landscape, this home built for a master gardener takes every opportunity to draw in views of the surrounding gardens and rolling hills, while also creating a warm and comfortable space suitable for a multi-generational family. The form of the reclaimed barnwood-clad house is reminiscent of a farm structure or even a greenhouse with its gridded glazing and pitched roof, and high windows at each end of the main volume flood the home with light. Gardens designed in collaboration with notable plantsman Dan Hinkley are visible from every room, and window walls in the living area allow the gardens to become a part of the home. A green roof continues the home’s emphasis on integrating into its natural surroundings. The entry sequence brings visitors underneath leafy trellises to a front door that opens to a long vista through the living room, opening to views of the verdant hillside beyond. A long gallery corridor separates the private bedroom spaces from the more “public” living spaces, and showcases the owners’ artworks. Their art extends into the main living areas with custom casework designed to display a rich collection of Asian porcelain, as well as a hand-painted mural by Leo Adams in the dining room. Interior materials incorporate the earthy, textural feeling of the outdoor gardens, including cedar walls and reclaimed Baba fir floors that complement the owners’ mix of antique and contemporary furnishings, including a coffee table designed by Jim Olson. Exposed timber ceilings in the main volume lend a sense of rustic refinement that is complimented by the stone fireplace separating the den and living room. Easily accessible outdoor living spaces and ponds offer plentiful spaces for family gatherings woven into the lush surroundings. Project Team: Jim Olson, FAIA, Design Principal; Steve Grim, Project Manager; Martha Rogers, Project Architect; Bryan Berkas, Staff Architect; Christine Burkland, Interior Designer General Contractor: Otis Construction Civil Engineer: ZTEC Engineers, Inc. Consultant: Dynamic Architectural Windows and Doors Consultant: Spearhead Landscape Architect: Daniel J. Hinkley Lighting Designer: Brian Hood Lighting Design, Inc. Structural Engineer: Madden & Baughman Engineering, Inc.

Country Garden House | Olson Kundig
Country Garden House | Olson Kundig
Country Garden House | Olson Kundig
Country Garden House | Olson Kundig
Country Garden House | Olson Kundig


28 Spooky, Sophisticated Ways to Get Your Home Into the Halloween Spirit

Permalink - Posted on 2018-10-18 01:08

Contrary to what some people may think, you don't have to go buy flimsy, Halloween-specific decorations in order to get your space ready for the scary movie night or costume party you've been wanting to host. Rather, you can use high-quality, modern products that you'll want to keep in your home way past October 31. It's all about the way they're placed and combined. Take a look at these 28 products we recommend for crafting a dark and spooky—yet sophisticated—space for the season. You'll also find some great entertaining tools that will make your guests want to go home and decorate their own space in all black.

Done by Deer Balloon Print Flag Garland
Menu Cyclades Vases
HAY Small Tree Trunk Vase in White
Fferrone Bird Cage Pendant Lamp
Iittala Sarpaneva Cast Iron Casserole


The Parabolic Glass House in Northern California Is One Architect’s Utopia in the Redwoods

Permalink - Posted on 2018-10-17 20:17

In the ’60s, using only materials found on their 400-acre plot of forest in Mendocino County, Charles Bello and his wife built a sustainable ranch—including an undulating glass house.

In the late 1960s, architect Charles Bello and his wife Vanna Rae purchased 400 acres of redwood forest in Northern California and slowly but surely began building 18 structures on the plot (and raising a family to boot).  

84-year-old Charles Bello left the world of California modernism in the 1960s to embark on his own nature-inspired, architectural journey among hundreds of acres of redwoods in Northern California.

84-year-old Charles Bello left the world of California modernism in the 1960s to embark on his own nature-inspired, architectural journey among hundreds of acres of redwoods in Northern California.

Photo: Andrew Hall

Among the buildings they constructed are the Parabolic Glass House and a small sculpture pavilion, two structures that evolved organically from their site. 

As Bello describes in a recent video by ThirtyThousand, the concept of the Parabolic Glass House was straightforward, and only took about 20 seconds to crystalize: the openings of the house begin where a nearby line of trees hit the sky, and then arch up in a parabolic shape to frame the view in front of them. The shape of the home arose from the site itself.

The wood for the home was harvested and dressed from Bello's property.

The wood for the home was harvested and dressed from Bello's property.

Courtesy of Andrew Birchett

The columns and flooring were also harvested from local trees.

The columns and flooring were also harvested from local trees.

Courtesy of Andrew Birchett

The home, built nearly 20 years ago, was designed so that it was nestled in with its surrounding cluster of trees, barely visible from views above. At the same time, the home’s wide expanses of open glass allowed for Bello and his family to feel deeply connected to the earth and outlying landscape. The buildings, which Bello calls "living sculpture," are the result of a lifelong commitment to design, craft, and forest conservation. 

The doors and views open onto the outlying landscape.

The doors and views open onto the outlying landscape.

Courtesy of Andrew Birchett

The undulating shape of the home forms a parabolic form, giving the house its name.

The undulating shape of the home forms a parabolic form, giving the house its name.

Courtesy of Andrew Birchett

Bello had been an intern for Richard Neutra in the 1950s and also worked for architect Henry Hill and landscape architect Robert Royston. He developed a keen interest in both the materiality of wood and the concrete, undulating forms of Italian architect and engineer Pier Luigi Nervi. With these two interests in mind, Bello set about exploring these concepts on his land, establishing the Redwood Forest Institute in the process. 

Astounding views fill the glass windows.

Astounding views fill the glass windows.

Courtesy of Andrew Birchett

The house is barely visible from above because it so thoughtfully blends into the surrounding landscape.

The house is barely visible from above because it so thoughtfully blends into the surrounding landscape.

Courtesy of Andrew Birchett

Impressively, Bello designed and built using only materials found on the site, and constructed the buildings himself and with the help of his wife. Today, his vision is to found a small, self-sustaining community that grows its own food, runs on solar power, and generates income through products made from readily available materials. 

Read more about how to get involved at The Redwood Forest Institute.

Bello finds inspiration in the land and nature of the site, and even established the Redwood Forest Institute with his wife Vanna Rae.

Bello finds inspiration in the land and nature of the site, and even established the Redwood Forest Institute with his wife Vanna Rae.

Courtesy of Andrew Birchett

The woven wood ceiling of the gallery houses Bello's wooden sculptures but is a piece of artwork in and of itself.

The woven wood ceiling of the gallery houses Bello's wooden sculptures but is a piece of artwork in and of itself.

Courtesy of Andrew Birchett


Skyline Residence

Permalink - Posted on 2018-10-17 20:02

Skyline Residence is a contemporary three-story, three-bedroom hilltop home located on a complex site on the Santa Barbara Mesa. The site constraints required a unique formal solution deploying a concrete and steel structural frame to maximize the responsiveness of the structure and organizing the living spaces from the top down, connecting them by a continuous circulatory core to make the home feel open and spacious. Each room of the residence has a connection to the exterior environment allowing the natural light and natural ventilation to flow through the house by taking advantage of the cool ocean breezes. Apertures between the floors create a natural exhaust pattern directing heat upwards through the central vertical circulation core and out of the structure. The exterior wood slat screen, awnings, and guardrails provide shading for the top floor to minimize heat-gain, while overhangs and exterior motorized blinds shade the glazing of the exterior envelope on the first floor. The materials of the house were chosen to be maintenance-free and utilize time to increase their beauty. The exterior Ipe wood weather over time into a silver-gray finish, while the Corten steel ages naturally and develops a rich texture and patina. No gypsum wallboard or paint is used throughout the residence, and all millwork is made from high-quality plywood. The Skyline Residence is ultra-responsive to the site constraints and shaped by an informed understanding of the view angles, honest material palette, and consistent with the values of modern, functional, efficient, and comfortable.

The location in Santa Barbara, allows for indoor-outdoor living and the home caters to this flow.
The exterior deck seamlessly transitions into the interior of the home.
A central stair allows for passive ventilation through the home, while serving as the homes central axis.
Stairs were custom-fabricated and welded on-site during construction.


Des Alouettes

Permalink - Posted on 2018-10-17 20:02

“Living in tree tops” sums up the potential for this steep terrain on the slopes of Mont-Saint-Bruno. The architectural answer to coexist with the strong topography of the site is simply asserted by: • A 4-level tower • A bridge connecting the top of the tower to the road • A large cantilevered terrace to inhabit the landscape The result is a projection in the landscape from the living rooms and the relaxation areas. The interface with the street is limited to access and some breakthroughs so as to voluntarily orient the experience towards the wooded panorama. Inside, a central staircase revolves around white vertical blades, a slender trunk allowing light to pass between the floors. The ascent to the mezzanine, like a leaf at the end of a twig, culminates in an enfolding work space clad in wood; an observatory nest at the top of the trees.


An Australian Home Relishes Sunshine With a New Extension

Permalink - Posted on 2018-10-17 19:12

Thanks to an airy addition, a minimalist cottage becomes an indoor-outdoor paradise for a couple to raise their young kids, dogs, and chickens.

Designed by local firm Hogg & Lamb, a Queensland cottage known as B&B Residence has been thoughtfully extended with a crisp, new facade to better connect to its subtropical setting. Although the existing home sits at the street-edge of a steeply sloping site in full views of its neighbors, Hogg & Lamb have created the addition to not only feature a central courtyard, but also be built upon a raised ground plane—ensuring more privacy and meaningful connection to the communal spaces.

By creating a series of platforms and courtyards to expand the functional ground plane, B&B Residence circumvents the challenges of its steep site.

By creating a series of platforms and courtyards to expand the functional ground plane, B&B Residence circumvents the challenges of its steep site. 

Courtesy of Christopher Frederick Jones

The interior spaces were designed to create an interesting geometry of interlinking planes that embrace and engage the raised grass courtyard on the northern edge of the house.

The interior spaces were designed to create an interesting geometry of interlinking planes that embrace and engage the raised grass courtyard on the northern edge of the house. 

Courtesy of Christopher Frederick Jones

Blade walls and double-height external volumes were incorporated to the new 4,000-square-foot residence to provide shade from the western sun. 

The entrance to the residence.

The entrance to the residence.

Courtesy of Christopher Frederick Jones

A double-height Outdoor Room  provides opportunities for al fresco living all year long.

A double-height Outdoor Room  provides opportunities for al fresco living all year long. 

Courtesy of Christopher Frederick Jones

Carefully positioned thresholds reduce solar penetration and heat gain, while the courtyard increases cross ventilation. 

Direct connections from the interior to the courtyard allow the parents to keep and eye on their children as they peacefully play.

Direct connections from the interior to the courtyard allow the parents to keep and eye on their children as they peacefully play.   

Courtesy of Christopher Frederick Jones

A peek at the outdoor pool.

A peek at the outdoor pool.

Courtesy of Christopher Frederick Jones

An airy, sun-drenched playroom.

An airy, sun-drenched playroom.

Courtesy of Christopher Frederick Jones

The children and adult ‘zones’ overlap, yet are still well defined.

The new extension contains communal spaces, as well as the master bedroom.

The new extension contains communal spaces, as well as the master bedroom.

Courtesy of Christopher Frederick Jones

The owners' minimalist sensibilities informed the aesthetics, which have been guided by an elegant, bleached palette and stripped-back surfaces.

The owners' minimalist sensibilities informed the aesthetics, which have been guided by an elegant, bleached palette and stripped-back surfaces.

Courtesy of Christopher Frederick Jones

The residence has large, open spaces for communal activities, as well as pockets of more private nooks for quiet time.

In the kitchen, which functions as the heart of the house, the architects have created a geometrically pure, double-height barrel vault.

In the kitchen, which functions as the heart of the house, the architects have created a geometrically pure, double-height barrel vault. 

Courtesy of Christopher Frederick Jones

"The restrained palette of materials highlights the essential qualities of nature—the blue of sky, the green of lawn, and the turquoise of water—in a heightened and serene atmosphere of calm," says the studio’s director Michael Hogg. 

Brick plinths that rise from the ground around the edge of the courtyard not only help define space and volumes, but also provide places to sit, to play with pets, to put the laundry baskets, and drop off the groceries.

Brick plinths that rise from the ground around the edge of the courtyard not only help define space and volumes, but also provide places to sit, to play with pets, to put the laundry baskets, and drop off the groceries.   

Courtesy of Christopher Frederick Jones

Typical features of Queenslander cottages such as skirtings, architraves and cornices were removed, so nature could become the visual focus, heightening the peaceful atmosphere of the home.

Smaller barrel vaults in the master bedroom create uniformity between the interlocking volumes.

Smaller barrel vaults in the master bedroom create uniformity between the interlocking volumes.  

Courtesy of Christopher Frederick Jones

"The barrel vaults create an acoustically pleasing space, while the geometry provides something memorable and unique," says Hogg.

"The barrel vaults create an acoustically pleasing space, while the geometry provides something memorable and unique," says Hogg.

Courtesy of Christopher Frederick Jones

"The material palette, whilst restrained in its tonal range, is elaborate in the way that finishes are nuanced to reflect light, temper glare, and evoke tactility. B&B Residence explores the duality of a rigorous yet relaxed interior that fluidly and joyfully interacts with its subtropical climate and landscaped setting," explains Hogg. 

"To create a peaceful, minimalist house, it was important to remove superfluous materials, features, and distractions. In order to then define significant rooms throughout the house, we focused on the notion of 'volume as room maker,' rather than relying on the use of materials," says Hogg.

"To create a peaceful, minimalist house, it was important to remove superfluous materials, features, and distractions. In order to then define significant rooms throughout the house, we focused on the notion of 'volume as room maker,' rather than relying on the use of materials," says Hogg.

Courtesy of Christopher Frederick Jones

B&B Residence floor-plan drawing

B&B Residence floor-plan drawing

Courtesy of Hogg & Lamb

Project Credits: 

Architecture and interior design: Hogg & Lamb / @hoggandlamb

Builder: Willconstruct & Design

Structural engineering: Westera Partners

Landscape design: Larc Collective

Cabinetry: Wyer and Craw


A Carbon-Neutral Concrete House Is an Exemplary Infill in Western Australia

Permalink - Posted on 2018-10-17 18:55

Australian firm Whispering Smith uses commercial materials in a limited footprint for a wabi-sabi effect.

Soft gray concrete, a polycarbonate screen, and metal roof bedeck the simple front facade of House A. Not immediately apparent? An underground water collection tank and solar panels. "We used a really high recycled content mix for our tilt-up concrete walls, which have 65-percent slag [a byproduct of steel production] instead of high-carbon emitting Portland cement," say the architects.

"The brief was to take a 175-square-meter block under Perth’s single bedroom dwelling code and make an affordable and sustainable home," describe the architects at Whispering Smith, a feminist architecture firm based in South Fremantle, a suburb of Perth. 

The resulting 753-square-foot home, called House A, combines concrete and reclaimed brick with strategic tile and wood accents to fashion a carbon-neutral home that maximizes its small lot.

Soft gray concrete, a polycarbonate screen, and metal roof bedeck the simple front facade of House A. Not immediately apparent? An underground water collection tank and solar panels. "We used a really high recycled content mix for our tilt-up concrete walls, which have 65-percent slag [a byproduct of steel production] instead of high-carbon emitting Portland cement," say the architects.

Soft gray concrete, a polycarbonate screen, and metal roof bedeck the simple front facade of House A. Not immediately apparent? An underground water collection tank and solar panels. "We used a really high recycled content mix for our tilt-up concrete walls, which have 65-percent slag [a byproduct of steel production] instead of high-carbon emitting Portland cement," say the architects.

Photo: Ben Hosking

Blackened, recycled wood slats define the front entry alcove. "The design of House A was originally intended to challenge the status quo of oversized and low-quality housing in Western Australia," say the architects.

Blackened, recycled wood slats define the front entry alcove. "The design of House A was originally intended to challenge the status quo of oversized and low-quality housing in Western Australia," say the architects.

Photo: Ben Hosking

In the main living area, large doors open to the backyard, while a built-in sofa and bench clad in tile are tucked under the mezzanine level, which hosts the bedroom and en-suite bathroom. Internal spaces are intended to flow easily into each other to maximize the floor plan.

In the main living area, large doors open to the backyard, while a built-in sofa and bench clad in tile are tucked under the mezzanine level, which hosts the bedroom and en-suite bathroom. Internal spaces are intended to flow easily into each other to maximize the floor plan.

Photo: Ben Hosking

Key to the design is a generous connection to the rear courtyard, which makes it possible to live outside for half of the year and also easily host parties with 30 guests.

Key to the design is a generous connection to the rear courtyard, which makes it possible to live outside for half of the year and also easily host parties with 30 guests.

Photo: Ben Hosking

Recycled bricks form a core wall and support the central staircase. A white metal railing is another layer of texture in the scheme. "The project relied heavily on craft, detailing, and a raw material or 'wabi-sabi' spec to provide amenity and delight in the small footprint," say the architects.

Recycled bricks form a core wall and support the central staircase. A white metal railing is another layer of texture in the scheme. "The project relied heavily on craft, detailing, and a raw material or 'wabi-sabi' spec to provide amenity and delight in the small footprint," say the architects.

Photo: Ben Hosking

The entrance to the galley kitchen, with the tile repeated below the built-in bench.

The entrance to the galley kitchen, with the tile repeated below the built-in bench.

Photo: Ben Hosking

In the kitchen, white concrete counters top white cabinetry and abut a tile accent wall. The streamlined palette of the house "originated from a desire to have a space to unwind in that wasn't over-saturated with trends or design features or glossy plastic finishes," say the architects.

In the kitchen, white concrete counters top white cabinetry and abut a tile accent wall. The streamlined palette of the house "originated from a desire to have a space to unwind in that wasn't over-saturated with trends or design features or glossy plastic finishes," say the architects.

Photo: Ben Hosking

The mezzanine level hosts the bedroom.

The mezzanine level hosts the bedroom.

Photo: Ben Hosking

According to the architects, the firm "merged spaces and volumes to achieve simultaneous privacy and openness without the need for doors and walls." An open closet adjoins the upper level ensuite bathroom and looks neat and tidy with detailed finishes that are consistent with the rest of the house.

According to the architects, the firm "merged spaces and volumes to achieve simultaneous privacy and openness without the need for doors and walls." An open closet adjoins the upper level ensuite bathroom and looks neat and tidy with detailed finishes that are consistent with the rest of the house.

Photo: Ben Hosking

A detail of the ensuite bathroom. "House A embodies our desire to build something relevant for our generation," say the architects. "A lot of younger people and downsizers don't have a lot of stuff or are having children much later, and we are using our homes for all kinds of things, from starting businesses or hosting a long table dinner for 20. We wanted to build a prototype house that did all of these things, while being affordable, sustainable and made from really beautiful, long lasting materials."

A detail of the ensuite bathroom. "House A embodies our desire to build something relevant for our generation," say the architects. "A lot of younger people and downsizers don't have a lot of stuff or are having children much later, and we are using our homes for all kinds of things, from starting businesses or hosting a long table dinner for 20. We wanted to build a prototype house that did all of these things, while being affordable, sustainable and made from really beautiful, long lasting materials."

Photo: Ben Hosking


Project Credits:

Architecture: Whispering Smith (@whisperingsmitharchitecture)

Construction: Talo Construction 

Landscaping: M&B Johnston Building and Landscapes 

Custom steel windows: Designed by Whispering Smith and made by Wilding Welding

Where to Stay in Perth


A Saltbox Home Is Revamped to Embrace its Sublime Cove Setting

Permalink - Posted on 2018-10-17 18:08

A Brooklyn–based family enlists an architect to radically modernize their 1970s vacation home in Martha's Vineyard.

"Because the living room occupies the gable, the resultant space is triangular in feel," Thompson says. So she heightened that look with an oversized triangle window, which maximizes views of the cove. Western red cedar was chosen for the walls, and three-inch red oak was chosen for the interior floors. The windows are encased in Alaskan Yellow Cedar.

There was never a question about the goal of this home renovation—in fact, it was a rare opportunity to capitalize on an obvious perk. 

 "The home is located on a cove on Martha's Vineyard, surrounded by farmland. There are expansive views in all directions," architect Maryann Thompson says. "A nearby silo and an adjacent cove are both focal points of those views." 

Western Red Cedar with a clear vertical grain was paired with vertical and horizontal shiplap for the exterior siding.

Western Red Cedar with a clear vertical grain was paired with vertical and horizontal shiplap for the exterior siding. 

Chuck Choi

Yet the young couple who bought this property couldn't see much of it from the existing saltbox architecture, which was originally built in the 1970s. They imagined a much brighter vacation home for their family to escape to from Brooklyn, New York; a place where the sights were as easy to come by as the breeze. 

They also asked that there be enough room for more guests, in case anyone else they knew wanted to see the stunning surroundings for themselves. With these needs in mind, Thompson got to work on a clear mission to bring the outdoors in.  

"Because the living room occupies the gable, the resultant space is triangular in feel," Thompson says. So she heightened that look with an oversized triangle window, which maximizes views of the cove. Western red cedar was chosen for the walls, and three-inch red oak was chosen for the interior floors. The windows are encased in Alaskan Yellow Cedar.

"Because the living room occupies the gable, the resultant space is triangular in feel," Thompson says. So she heightened that look with an oversized triangle window, which maximizes views of the cove. Western red cedar was chosen for the walls, and three-inch red oak was chosen for the interior floors. The windows are encased in Alaskan Yellow Cedar. 

Chuck Choi

"We used the existing footprint and basic saltbox shape, but we radically modernized the house inside by opening the interiors up to light and the landscape," she says.  

Thompson wanted to create "layered and veiled spaces" inside, which was achieved with multiple places to gather in the main corridor. The corridor is open from the second floor down to the basement, and has a combination of skylights and windows for ample light. Paradis MetalWorks supplied the rail and stair stringers.

Thompson wanted to create "layered and veiled spaces" inside, which was achieved with multiple places to gather in the main corridor. The corridor is open from the second floor down to the basement, and has a combination of skylights and windows for ample light. Paradis MetalWorks supplied the rail and stair stringers. 

Chuck Choi

She cleared the home of its decades-old mildew and created a "reverse" layout that placed the living area upstairs and the bedrooms below. In that common space, a large triangular window was installed to provide a place to see the cove beyond, and Thompson made room for full-length seating directly below its glass. 

A few steps away, Thompson went one step further with the view-heavy design. "A second-level outdoor shower is located in a small niche at the top of the stairs, which creates an interesting ambiguity between indoor and outdoor space." 

A second-story outdoor shower sits at the top of the stairs. California Faucets supplied the shower head and shower arm. Eco Arbor interlocking deck tiles were used on the floor.

A second-story outdoor shower sits at the top of the stairs. California Faucets supplied the shower head and shower arm. Eco Arbor interlocking deck tiles were used on the floor. 

Chuck Choi

The downstairs renovation solved the potential need for more room. Two bedrooms can sleep four, but the third, well, it can sleep 12. 

"The bunk-bed room can handle all the kids," Thompson says. "There are also two small nooks off the hallway for spontaneous get-togethers, or for alone time." 

"The two queen bedrooms can handle two couples, while the bunk-bed room can handle all the kids," Thompson says. She also made sure every bunk had a window, to act as a "mini room."

"The two queen bedrooms can handle two couples, while the bunk-bed room can handle all the kids," Thompson says. She also made sure every bunk had a window, to act as a "mini room."

Chuck Choi

And to make sure that the downstairs and upstairs felt united, Thompson used one natural product throughout the home that's another nod to its setting: red oak. 

"Wood was chosen as a main feature of the property for three reasons," she says. "It sequesters carbon, so its use indoors is good for the environment. It also feels cool to the touch in the summer, and warm in the winter. The third reason is that a wooden interior references the old fishing cabins on the Vineyard that were built without insulation." 

"We took a 1970s kit greenhouse off the west side of the house, which was making the home overheat, and replaced that area of footprint with a covered porch that shades the western glass," Thompson says.

"We took a 1970s kit greenhouse off the west side of the house, which was making the home overheat, and replaced that area of footprint with a covered porch that shades the western glass," Thompson says.

Chuck Choi

Given the home's many skylights and large windows, as well as its multiple sliding doors, it's safe to say that Thompson achieved the overall goal. 

"The site has such beautiful views," she says. "We just had to find ways to open the house up to them." 

Project Details:

Architect: Maryann Thompson Architects  / @maryannthompsonarchitects

Builder: Tate Builders, Inc. 

Structural Engineer: Sourati Engineering Group

Civil Engineer: Schofield, Barbini, and Hoehn Inc. 

Landscape Design: Michael Van Valkenburgh Associates

Interior Design: Shelter

Cabinetry Design: Herrick and White 

Photography: Chuck Choi


Get Cozy by the Sea in This A-Frame Cabin Asking $649K

Permalink - Posted on 2018-10-17 17:10

Crafted into the epitome of hygge living, this renovated A-frame combines midcentury-modern charms with earthy, Scandinavian-inspired design.

Originally built in 1974 as a kit home, the A-Frame was constructed with cedar siding and metal roofing. The house faces east toward the water.

Seven years ago, the sight of a dilapidated A-frame stopped Christine Boyer and Anthonie Scholtz dead in their tracks. The couple had been in route to see nearby properties on Vancouver Island, but they instead fell in love with this charming, midcentury-modern dwelling—never mind that it was falling apart.

With their young children in tow, the couple sold their Toronto home to move into the seaside cabin—at that time a cramped one-bedroom—and embarked on a years-long renovation that saw a full interior overhaul.

Completed between the birth of their third child and Anthonie’s doctoral defense, the built-in library is one of the couple’s favorite features in the cabin.

Completed between the birth of their third child and Anthonie’s doctoral defense, the built-in library is one of the couple’s favorite features in the cabin.

Ben Rahn

Working alongside Kai Lawrence of Standingbear Construction, Christine and Anthonie replaced the cabin’s 1970s turquoise walls and shag carpeting with a minimalist and modern aesthetic, full of Scandinavian influences that draw from the couple’s Danish roots. In honor of their heritage, they christened their 1,401-square-foot house "Kyst Hus," which translates in Danish to ‘coastal home.’

Originally built in 1974 as a kit home, the A-Frame was constructed with cedar siding and metal roofing. The house faces east toward the water.

Originally built in 1974 as a kit home, the A-Frame was constructed with cedar siding and metal roofing. The house faces east toward the water.

Ben Rahn

Located in Vancouver Island’s Craigdarroch Beach neighbourhood, Kyst Hus overlooks stunning vistas of Gilles Bay and offers easy access to kayaking, canoeing, and swimming.

Located in Vancouver Island’s Craigdarroch Beach neighbourhood, Kyst Hus overlooks stunning vistas of Gilles Bay and offers easy access to kayaking, canoeing, and swimming.

Ben Rahn

After years of crafting Kyst Hus into a warm and welcoming home—and a celebrated design icon for the community—the family of five has sadly outgrown the two-bedroom cabin and has listed their A-frame for $649,000.

The home is heated primarily by wood, but has electric baseboards in the main living area.

The home is heated primarily by wood, but has electric baseboards in the main living area.

Ben Rahn

The kitchen was revamped with new modern appliances, including a dishwasher. The custom kitchen island was built from two IKEA cabinets on wheels, topped with an aluminum countertop, and wrapped in salvaged cedar-fence panels.

The kitchen was revamped with new modern appliances, including a dishwasher. The custom kitchen island was built from two IKEA cabinets on wheels, topped with an aluminum countertop, and wrapped in salvaged cedar-fence panels.

Ben Rahn

"Our initial plans for this house were to hide the strong lines of the A with a giant porch and tons of timber," says Christine. "But then we stopped and listened to this little building. It was through that listening-and-learning process that we decided to preserve this cabin and to make decisions while living here that maintained the integrity of the midcentury architecture and minimalist design of the A-frame."

Bathed in natural light, the upstairs master bedroom overlooks views of the living space below.

Bathed in natural light, the upstairs master bedroom overlooks views of the living space below.

Ben Rahn

The master bedroom enjoys direct access to the outdoor balcony.

The master bedroom enjoys direct access to the outdoor balcony.

Ben Rahn

Christine created the ‘Abstract No. 10, The Heavens Are Weeping’ artwork hanging in the upstairs bathroom. Both bathrooms in the property feature heated ceramic floors.

Christine created the ‘Abstract No. 10, The Heavens Are Weeping’ artwork hanging in the upstairs bathroom. Both bathrooms in the property feature heated ceramic floors.

Ben Rahn

"The only way five people (and three furries) can live full-time in a 1,400-square-foott A-frame is if everything has a place, and we are respectful of each other in the space," notes Christine. "It has been quite the experience to live in a home that would fit inside most other family homes."

Decorated with colorful flags handmade by Christine, the kids’ light-filled play-space can easily be converted into a second bedroom.

Decorated with colorful flags handmade by Christine, the kids’ light-filled play-space can easily be converted into a second bedroom.

Ben Rahn

The cozy loft-space above the kids’ playroom can be used as an additional sleeping area.

The cozy loft-space above the kids’ playroom can be used as an additional sleeping area.

Ben Rahn

"A small space encourages strong family bonding, and then an immediate and intense desire to get outside! Which is amazing for our bodies and minds. Kyst Hus has nurtured us in such an important and everlasting way. Today is thanks for small spaces where a person can recharge, be themselves, connect with loved ones, and re-establish ‘self’."   

The covered second-floor balcony boasts stellar ocean views.

The covered second-floor balcony boasts stellar ocean views.

Ben Rahn

The back of the home opens up to an outdoor patio, hot tub, and fire pit.

The back of the home opens up to an outdoor patio, hot tub, and fire pit.

Ben Rahn

Next to the A-frame sits a low-lying outbuilding (partially concealed by vegetation) that was converted from a garage into a woodshed and artist’s studio.

Next to the A-frame sits a low-lying outbuilding (partially concealed by vegetation) that was converted from a garage into a woodshed and artist’s studio.

Ben Rahn

4753 Kilmarnock Dr., Courtenay, Vancouver is now being listed by Leah Reichelt for $649,000. See the full listing here. 

Know of a home for sale or rent that should be featured on Dwell.com? Find out how to submit to Dwell!


Budget Breakdown: A Creative Couple Rehab a Vermont Cabin For $18K

Permalink - Posted on 2018-10-16 23:02

Enterprising couple Jenny McClary and Allie Leepson give their snug Vermont cabin a DIY makeover, which is now available to rent.

In 2017, Jenny McClary and Allie Leepson, a couple based in New York City, bought a small cabin in Vermont on a whim. They had been looking for property in Joshua Tree, but after being outbid several times, a short trip to Wardsboro in the southern part of the state led them to this 1982 gem.

$2,100
Fireplace
$3,250
Carpeting
$3,350
Engineered Hardwood
$1,800
Washer & Dryer
$600
Plumbing
$1,700
Electrical Work
$150
Hardware
$1,450
Interior Lighting
$300
Exterior Lighting
$590
Tech


Grand Total: $18,290

More Budget Breakdowns: See a neglected garage turned into a backyard hangout for $13K

Although the home had been sitting on the market for a year, the couple recognized good bones when they saw them. The interiors just needed a few small tweaks to give it a more modern look. "Our goal was to turn this traditional Vermont ski cabin into a well-designed space that’s more than just a place to take your snow boots off in," the couple say.

The 1,089-square-foot cabin sits on 1.5 acres of land.

The 1,089-square-foot cabin sits on 1.5 acres of land.

Jenny McClary and Allie Leepson

Before: When the couple bought the cabin, its good bones were apparent, and they knew they'd just need to make small tweaks to freshen it up.

Before: When the couple bought the cabin, its good bones were apparent, and they knew they'd just need to make small tweaks to freshen it up.

Jenny McClary and Allie Leepson

Before: Purple walls, fluffy carpeting, and a boring chandelier would have to go, but the pine paneling stayed.

Before: Purple walls, fluffy carpeting, and a boring chandelier would have to go, but the pine paneling stayed.

Jenny McClary and Allie Leepson

After purchase, the couple spent 4.5 months replacing flooring, swapping out hardware, painting, and wiring new lights in order to achieve a more streamlined style that's still cozy. Most importantly, they left the predominant knotty pine paneling in place, and not just because it was in good condition. 

"It gives the home that rustic, Vermont charm," say the couple, who run a creative studio called The 1909. "We love the way it picks up light in the late afternoon. We also think it makes our cabin smell amazing." 

The couple also installed a smart ductless heater and AC system through a promotion at their power company, Green Mountain Power. "It took our electric bills down from $700 to $100 a month, and now we can control everything through our phones," they say. "This was at absolutely no cost to us." 

A big draw when McClary and Leepson bought the cabin was the huge windows in the main living area.

A big draw when McClary and Leepson bought the cabin was the huge windows in the main living area.

Jenny McClary and Allie Leepson

The focal point of the revamped living room is the new old fireplace, which is a vintage copper Preway. "It’s from a midcentury vintage marketplace in Long Beach, California, called Urban Americana. They have an amazing selection always and we can count on them being in great condition," the couple tell Dwell. "It’s the pinnacle of the home."

The focal point of the revamped living room is the new old fireplace, which is a vintage copper Preway. "It’s from a midcentury vintage marketplace in Long Beach, California, called Urban Americana. They have an amazing selection always and we can count on them being in great condition," the couple tell Dwell. "It’s the pinnacle of the home."

Jenny McClary and Allie Leepson

They replaced the dated carpeting on the main floor with engineered hardwood and left the unfinished stone flooring in the kitchen in place. The kitchen also got new hardware and lighting.

They replaced the dated carpeting on the main floor with engineered hardwood and left the unfinished stone flooring in the kitchen in place. The kitchen also got new hardware and lighting.

Jenny McClary and Allie Leepson

The dining area now has a table from All Modern, chairs from Poly & Bark, and a sleek chandelier from West Elm.

The dining area now has a table from All Modern, chairs from Poly & Bark, and a sleek chandelier from West Elm.

Jenny McClary and Allie Leepson

The cabin has three bedrooms. The main bedroom was brightened up with a new coat of white paint and is furnished with Schoolhouse Electric sconces, the Nelson Bubble Lamp from Design Within Reach, and linens from CB2.

The cabin has three bedrooms. The main bedroom was brightened up with a new coat of white paint and is furnished with Schoolhouse Electric sconces, the Nelson Bubble Lamp from Design Within Reach, and linens from CB2.

Jenny McClary and Allie Leepson

New carpeting in the bunk room.

New carpeting in the bunk room.

Jenny McClary and Allie Leepson

The wrap-around deck is a fantastic summer destination, outfitted in finds from Amazon and Target.

The wrap-around deck is a fantastic summer destination, outfitted in finds from Amazon and Target.

Jenny McClary and Allie Leepson

The three-bed, two-bath Modern Vermont Cabin is available to rent on Airbnb and is on Instagram as @vermontcabin.

Have your own Budget Breakdown story to submit? Get in touch with Dwell!


Hotel Elephant

Permalink - Posted on 2018-10-16 22:09

The Hotel Elephant Weimar in the heart of the classic city is one of Germany's most historic and renowned hotels. Looking back on a long tradition the hotel is operated by arcona Hotels & Resorts and reopened in October 2018 as Autograph Collection hotel after extensive renovation. Under this brand, Marriott unites exceptional, hand-picked hotels with a unique perspective in design, craftsmanship and hospitality under the premise of "exactly like nothing else". The unique charm of the future boutique hotel is characterized by timelessly elegant design as well as classic Art Deco and Bauhaus elements, which are reflected in 99 comfortable rooms and suites, meeting rooms and public areas. Cultural topics and culinary art are in the focus of attention, as well as an in-house cultural expert opening the treasures of Weimar to guests in the house and on private city tours. One of them is the Hotel Elephant itself: for over three centuries it has been the hub of the city's social life. Text Courtesy of Marriott


A Stone Retreat in France Gets a Sleek Glass Addition

Permalink - Posted on 2018-10-16 19:29

Architect Jean-Luc Etienne updates an old stone cottage near the coast of Brittany, France, with a glass extension and Vipp kitchen.

Built in 1927 and renovated in 2014 with a contemporary, steel-and-glass addition, this stone retreat sits in the small commune of Plévenon near France’s picturesque Brittany coastline. The remodel was carried out by architect Jean-Luc Etienne, who wanted to create a haven where he, his partner Vlastimil Spelda, and his partner’s twin brother Vladimir can escape the hectic urban pace of life in Paris.

Kayaks wait to take the homeowners on an outdoor adventure.
The Vipp kitchen makes use of a modular concept with four basic forms: island, island with seating, wall, and tall modules.

The 2,153-square-foot house spans two levels and includes four bedrooms, two bathrooms, an open-concept living space that looks out to panoramic views of the forest, and a streamlined kitchen from the Danish design brand Vipp.

The glass-and-steel extension allows the homeowners to embed themselves in the natural environment.

"Ten years ago, we came to the region as tourists to admire the coastline of Fréhel," says Vlastimil. "By chance, we passed a local real estate agent hanging up recent postings, and there it was."

In the living room, a B&B Italia sofa and chair and Arco Floor Lamp rest on a Beni Ouarain rug.
Built-in storage for firewood allows the homeowners to stack logs by the fireplace.
The dining area is just steps from the outdoors. A B&B Italia dining table and chairs create a minimalist setting.
The Vipp kitchen is raised on legs for easy cleaning.

At the time of purchase, the classic Breton stone house was in poor condition. It was not the house that won them over, but rather its idyllic surroundings. The property was nestled amid tall cedar, apple, and maple trees; to ensure that would always be able to enjoy the green views from the house, the trio also purchased the field next to house, so they could create the new extension.

A Husk Armchair by Patricia Urquiola provides a cozy perch. The table lamp is made from an old boat mast, and the gray ceramics are also by Vipp.
The vintage dresser was found in Saint-Malo, a historic port city in Brittany.

Etienne’s idea was to transform the old house into a contemporary retreat that would have the feel of a cabin in the woods. After adding the steel-and-glass box to the existing stone structure, he reconfigured the interior floor plan and relocated the kitchen and bathroom to better capture the evening sunlight.

A bedroom window frames forest views.

"We didn't want to extend the house in the old-fashioned way with the same look and material," says Etienne. "We did the opposite by adding a 323-square-foot glass cube supported by steel beams to the existing stone construction. This way, we invited the most important asset of the area inside—the wild nature."

A skylight allows natural light to flow over the freestanding tub. The taps, soap dispenser, and pedal bin are by Vipp.


Project Credits:

Architecture: Jean-Luc Etienne, Vlastimil Spelda, and Vladimir Spelda

Kitchen: Vipp 


This Canadian Tiny Home Beams a Rustic, West Coast Vibe

Permalink - Posted on 2018-10-16 19:15

Smart storage tactics are combined with a U-shaped sofa to maximize space in this delightful tiny home.

Strategically designed by Canadian tiny home builders Summit Tiny Homes, The West Coast is a 375-square-foot tiny house sited on Vancouver Island in British Columbia for a young family of four. Featuring a double-door entry, as well as a hidden, mechanical slide-out, the striking abode also has a unique exterior facade of wooden shingles and green-stained siding—inspired by homes in the Pacific Northwest. 

The living area, bathroom, and kitchen are located on the main floor. Two loft bedrooms occupy the upper level.

The living area, bathroom, and kitchen are located on the main floor. Two loft bedrooms occupy the upper level.

Courtesy of Gabriela Sladkova Photography

Inside, custom hardwood floors, whitewashed walls, and stained beams and trimmings allow the house to feel bright, warm, and modern, all with a splash of rustic charm. 

In the living area is a U-shaped, multi-use couch that can be easily turned into a guest bed when needed.

In the living area is a U-shaped, multi-use couch that can be easily turned into a guest bed when needed. 

Courtesy of Gabriela Sladkova Photography

Behind the couch is a split staircase—with plenty of hidden storage built inside—that leads up to the kids' sleeping loft. The upper level also consists of a master loft, which includes a bed and a small work space. 

The home boasts a cheery yellow entrance door.

The home boasts a cheery yellow entrance door.

Courtesy of Gabriela Sladkova Photography

In the dining area is a custom-built oak table that can be folded up and down in three different sections. 

The ladder to the loft can be slid to the side when not in use.

The ladder to the loft can be slid to the side when not in use. 

Courtesy of Gabriela Sladkova Photography

Just beyond the kitchen is a built-in "his and her" wardrobe with plenty of drawers and hanging space, followed by a bathroom that features a fully tiled bath and shower. The built-in bathroom sink and vanity have also been designed with plenty of storage space, and includes a Separett Villa compost toilet that is placed next to the large washer-dryer unit. 

A peek at the dining bar.

A peek at the dining bar.

Courtesy of Gabriela Sladkova Photography

At night, the owners can look up at the stars through the skylight in the lofted bedroom area.

At night, the owners can look up at the stars through the skylight in the lofted bedroom area.

Courtesy of Gabriela Sladkova Photography

The dining table can be folded in three sections for different uses.

The dining table can be folded in three sections for different uses.

Courtesy of Gabriela Sladkova Photography

The wooden worktop creates additional usable table space above the washing machine.

The wooden worktop creates additional usable table space above the washing machine.

Courtesy of Gabriela Sladkova Photography

The kitchen is fitted with oak countertops, a farm sink, white cabinetry, a green tile backsplash, an LG 28-inch fridge, a 24-inch kitchen stove by Unique Off-grid Appliances, and a range hood.

The kitchen is fitted with oak countertops, a farm sink, white cabinetry, a green tile backsplash, an LG 28-inch fridge, a 24-inch kitchen stove by Unique Off-grid Appliances, and a range hood. 

Courtesy of Gabriela Sladkova Photography

Project Credits:

Architecture and design: Summit Tiny Homes / @summittinyhomes

Cabinetry: CK Design


A Strikingly Modern Container House Boasts Breathtaking Views

Permalink - Posted on 2018-10-16 18:22

Inspired by cargotecture, this boxy dwelling in West Vancouver features an efficient layout that makes the most of its hillside views.

Protected by a roof overhang, the sunken lounge provides sweeping southeastern views of the city and fjord beyond.

With their three children grown and retirement on the horizon, the couple that hired design duo Matthew Mcleod and Lisa Bovell of local firm McLeod Bovell were ready for a "simplified" and efficient home with reduced reliance on stairs.

"When we initially heard the design brief from the clients, the analogy of ‘the shipping container’ struck us as a good starting point for designing a small house that operated in a very efficient way, providing all of the main living and sleeping functions on one floor," explain Matt and Lisa of the Container House, a two-story dwelling envisioned as two volumes stacked perpendicular to each other.

In contrast to their former house that had been set on a flat, densely wooded lot, the clients picked a steeply sloped West Vancouver property with sweeping panoramic views.

In contrast to their former house that had been set on a flat, densely wooded lot, the clients picked a steeply sloped West Vancouver property with sweeping panoramic views.

Ema Peter

A small bridge connects the parking pad to the front entrance with a large pivot door. The home is primarily clad in Swiss Pearl exterior cement composite panels, Accoya timber, and painted metal panels on an open rain screen.

A small bridge connects the parking pad to the front entrance with a large pivot door. The home is primarily clad in Swiss Pearl exterior cement composite panels, Accoya timber, and painted metal panels on an open rain screen.

Ema Peter

"Although planning guidelines would have allowed for a slightly larger house on three floors, it was decided that a scheme with only two levels—though smaller in size overall—would create a house with more generous interior volumes and greater architectural possibility."

Protected by a roof overhang, the sunken lounge provides sweeping southeastern views of the city and fjord beyond.

Protected by a roof overhang, the sunken lounge in the rear of the home provides sweeping southeastern views of the city and fjord beyond.

Ema Peter

Created for aging in place, the 3,350-square-foot Container House organizes the primary living areas—including the master bedroom and bath—on the upper level. Two addition bedrooms, an office, and recreation room are located downstairs and can also be reached via an elevator. The garage is set at a split-level between the two floors to further minimize vertical movement inside the home.

The L-shaped upper floor culminates in a dramatically cantilevered master bedroom wing that's elevated high above the roofs of the neighboring houses.

The L-shaped upper floor culminates in a dramatically cantilevered master bedroom wing that's elevated high above the roofs of the neighboring houses.

Ema Peter

The cantilevered wing provides privacy by obscuring views into the yard.

The cantilevered wing provides privacy by obscuring views into the yard.

Ema Peter

"This strategy minimizes vertical travel within the house by eliminating one flight of stairs," explain the designers of their choice of a two-story design instead of one with three floors. "The impression is of a series of spaces which are expansive yet intimately connected horizontally and vertically."

The projecting volume also protects the pool from solar glare.

The projecting volume also protects the pool from solar glare.

Ema Peter

The swimming pool's dark tile finish mirrors the cantilevered container above it.

The swimming pool's dark tile finish mirrors the cantilevered container above it.

Ema Peter

The property’s steep slope and narrow width proved challenging when creating indoor/outdoor living spaces. Forced to stack rooms behind one another, the architects maintained sight-lines using level changes. For example, the living room is located behind, and a few steps above, the dining area, which is placed behind the sunken lounge.

Elevated on an engineered hardwood floor, the living room is smartly furnished with a Flex Form "Beauty" sectional sofa, Minotti "Sullivan" coffee table, Kurva "The Bow Lamp," and a hand-woven wool rug by Paulig for Salari.

Elevated on an engineered hardwood floor, the living room is smartly furnished with a Flex Form "Beauty" sectional sofa, Minotti "Sullivan" coffee table, Kurva "The Bow Lamp," and a hand-woven wool rug by Paulig for Salari.

Ema Peter

The Tadeo dining table by Walter Knoll is combined with Tokyo chairs by Bensen.

The Tadeo dining table by Walter Knoll is combined with Tokyo chairs by Bensen.

Ema Peter

Walls of operable glass, covered outdoor living areas, and cantilevered forms further blur the line between indoor and outdoor living.

A dramatic outdoor linear fireplace continues from the dining area to the sunken lounge.

A dramatic outdoor linear fireplace continues from the dining area to the sunken lounge.

Ema Peter

The outdoor lounge chairs and chaise are by Richard Schultz for Knoll.

The outdoor lounge chairs and chaise are by Richard Schultz for Knoll.

Ema Peter

A skylight pours an abundance of natural light into the master bath, which is outfitted with a Laufen bathtub.

A skylight pours an abundance of natural light into the master bath, which is outfitted with a Laufen bathtub.

Ema Peter

The integrated sink/counter is also by Laufen. The plumbing fixtures are by Zuchetti.

The integrated sink/counter is also by Laufen. The plumbing fixtures are by Zuchetti.

Ema Peter

Container House lower floor plan.
Container House upper floor plan.
Container House roof plan.
Container House section.

Project Credits:

Interior Design: McLeod Bovell Modern Houses / @mcleodbovell

Builder/ General Contractor: JBR Construction

Structural Engineer: Chui Hippman

Landscape Design: Botanica

Lighting Design: McLeod Bovell Modern Houses

Cabinetry: Munro Woodworking


Snag This Hollywood Hills Midcentury Home For $1M

Permalink - Posted on 2018-10-16 06:43

A perfectly preserved, post-and beam structure hits the market in Los Angeles—and it's priced to move.

The open-plan living space is anchored by a horizontal brick-inlay fireplace.

Nestled into a 6,185-square-foot lot in the Hollywood Hills, the Gardiner House is a beautiful example of the Californian midcentury aesthetic, and was built in 1954 by USC School of Architecture student Alvin H. Galpert.

Entering the three-bedroom, two-bath dwelling is like stepping back in time—floor-to-ceiling windows create a sense of seamless indoor/outdoor living, while wood paneling, a slate entry, and the original orange Formica kitchen give the home plenty of authentic midcentury charm. 

The Gardiner House is an authentic midcentury gem nestled into the Hollywood Hills.

 The Gardiner House is an authentic midcentury gem nestled in the Hollywood Hills.

Michael McNamara

Exposed beams run the length of the tongue-and-groove ceiling and define the open-plan living space. The historic home even comes complete with its own 15 minutes of Hollywood history, as it was originally built for Cecil B. DeMille's boom operator, Cecil Gardiner, and his wife Mary Jane. 

Gardiner served as an extra in Billy Wilder's 1950's film Sunset Boulevard, showing up in the scene where Norma goes to visit DeMille (who made a cameo appearance in the film) in his office at Paramount Pictures. 

The post-and-beam construction was designed for indoor/outdoor living and has been perfectly preserved over the years, with only two owners.

The post-and-beam construction was designed for indoor/outdoor living and has been perfectly preserved over the years, with only two owners. 

Michael McNamara

The open-plan living space is anchored by a horizontal brick-inlay fireplace.

The open-plan living space is anchored by a horizontal brick-inlay fireplace. 

Michael McNamara

The slate entry features privacy glass.

The slate entry features privacy glass. 

Michael McNamara

The room extends straight out to the yard, with a wall of glass creating a seamless connection.

The room extends straight out to the yard, with glazing creating a seamless connection to the outdoors. 

Michael McNamara

Wood paneling and clerestory windows add to the authentic midcentury charm.

Wood paneling and clerestory windows add to the authentic midcentury charm. 

Michael McNamara

The living room is capped by a dining area at the other end, where another wall of glass opens to the other side of the home, creating the potential for lovely cross breezes.

The living room is capped by a dining area at the other end, where another wall of glass opens to the other side of the home, creating the potential for lovely cross breezes. 

Michael McNamara

A look at the dining area. Note how the wood paneling appears to extend straight out into the fence on the exterior.

A look at the dining area. Note how the wood paneling appears to extend straight out into the fence on the exterior. 

Michael McNamara

The kitchen is just off the dining area.

The kitchen is set just off the dining area. 

Michael McNamara

The original kitchen has vintage chrome hardware, a Western Holly oven, orange Formica counters, and cork flooring.

The original kitchen has vintage chrome hardware, a Western Holly oven, orange Formica counters, and cork flooring. 

Michael McNamara

A view from the kitchen looking out toward the dining room.

A view from the kitchen looking out toward the dining room. 

Michael McNamara

The home features three bedrooms in a private wing and two full baths.

The home features three bedrooms in a private wing and two full baths. 

Michael McNamara

One of the bathrooms.

One of the bathrooms. 

Michael McNamara

The second bedroom has doors leading to the outdoor patio.

The second bedroom has doors leading to the outdoor patio. 

Michael McNamara

The patio features space for al fresco dining.

The patio features plenty of space for al fresco dining.

Michael McNamara

The outdoor space.

The outdoor patio looking into the home. 

Michael McNamara

Spectacular views of the Hollywood hills make the property even more special.

Spectacular views of the Hollywood hills make the property even more special. 

Michael McNamara

3409 Oak Glen Drive, Los Angeles is being listed for $1,048,000 by Jacqueline Tager of Sotheby's International Realty, Los Feliz Brokerage.

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Where to Stay in Hollywood


A Streamlined Addition Serves a Family of Four in Australia

Permalink - Posted on 2018-10-15 23:46

Thomas + Williams Architects sow simplicity with an artful combination of concrete, oak, steel, and prefabricated panels in Port Melbourne, Victoria.

A modest polished concrete slab floor with hydronic in-slab heating anchors the new, open-concept living spaces.

The owners of this heritage home in Port Melbourne, Australia, approached Thomas + Williams Architects to demolish a 25-year-old addition and replace it with something that would better serve their family of four. The new, two-story addition to the 1800s-era home now hosts two new children’s bedrooms and a playroom upstairs, and a new living hub below.

"The challenge was to get the best light into the living areas," say the architects. "So, we employed a full-height wall of glass to the northwest with two large sliding panels of glass, to create a diluted boundary between inside and outside."

"The challenge was to get the best light into the living areas," say the architects. "So, we employed a full-height wall of glass to the northwest with two large sliding panels of glass, to create a diluted boundary between inside and outside."

Hilary Bradford

With the floor plan in place, the design brief was to keep the interior details simple. The architects responded by combining concrete, oak, prefabricated panels, and steel in thoughtful ways throughout. "It is a small site, so it was important to keep all design elements as simple as possible," say the architects.

A modest polished concrete slab floor with hydronic in-slab heating anchors the new, open-concept living spaces.

A modest polished concrete slab floor with hydronic in-slab heating anchors the new, open-concept living spaces.

Hilary Bradford

The fireplace feature wall has a concrete hearth, oak paneling, and wall-mounted cabinetry with pre-finished door slabs from New Age Veneers in the "Ravenswood" finish. A steel box integrated to the side of the fireplace stores wood, and glass walls make the most of the small site.

The fireplace feature wall has a concrete hearth, oak paneling, and wall-mounted cabinetry with pre-finished door slabs from New Age Veneers in the "Ravenswood" finish. A steel box integrated to the side of the fireplace stores wood, and glass walls make the most of the small site.

Hilary Bradford

A staircase with floating oak stair treads and a continuous steel railing goes up to the second floor. The cupboards on the left are fronted with the same "Ravenswood" panels, and a skylight floods the space with light.

A staircase with floating oak stair treads and a continuous steel railing goes up to the second floor. The cupboards on the left are fronted with the same "Ravenswood" panels, and a skylight floods the space with light.

Hilary Bradford

Oak and concrete meet a substantial marble countertop and backsplash in the kitchen.

Oak and concrete meet a substantial marble countertop and backsplash in the kitchen.

Hilary Bradford

A bank of pantry cabinets are clad in the "Ravenswood" panels to disguise sleek, black appliances.

A bank of pantry cabinets are clad in the "Ravenswood" panels to disguise sleek, black appliances.

Hilary Bradford

A detailed shot inside the pantry shows how it corrals counter clutter and hides small appliances.

A detailed shot inside the pantry shows how it corrals counter clutter and hides small appliances.

Hilary Bradford

In a bathroom, charcoal walls echo the darker finish of the prefabricated panels elsewhere, and a skylight makes the small space feel bigger.

In a bathroom, charcoal walls echo the darker finish of the prefabricated panels elsewhere, and a skylight makes the small space feel bigger.

Hilary Bradford

Oak cabinetry topped with marble continues the kitchen's themes in a bathroom.

Oak cabinetry topped with marble continues the kitchen's themes in a bathroom.

Hilary Bradford

Part of the project involved refurbishing the heritage part of the home. Old brickwork meets new oak joinery fabricated by COS Interiors, who were responsible for all of the home's new woodwork.

Part of the project involved refurbishing the heritage part of the home. Old brickwork meets new oak joinery fabricated by COS Interiors, who were responsible for all of the home's new woodwork.

Hilary Bradford

The architects suggested fitting in a new pool in the yard, much to the delight of the owners' children.

The architects suggested fitting in a new pool in the yard, much to the delight of the owners' children.

Hilary Bradford

Project Credits:

Architects: Stuart Williams & Andrew Bristow from Thomas & Williams Architects (@architects_tw

Builder: Appetite for Construction 

Joinery: COS Interiors

Tiling: Greenstone Tiling

Landscaping: Gourlay Landscaping 

Photographer: Hilary Bradford (@hilarybradfordphotography

Where to Stay in Melbourne


Over-The-Rhine Urban Revival

Permalink - Posted on 2018-10-15 22:36

This urban home is pioneering change for a much needed revival of art and design in the historic Over-The-Rhine neighborhood in Cincinnati, OH. While the boom of historic renovations in the area is on an upswing, its possible that no project may have been as ambitious as this single family residence, which included a complete renovation and addition to a dilapidated structure. The existing building had gone through years of roughshod additions, renovations, and updates. Architecture firm Platte Architecture + Design proposed an addition that amplified the historic spaces while opening the building up to an expansive, modern interior. The pursuit of LEED Platinum, complete with geothermal technology, contributes to this building’s unique place in the neighborhood.

The original shotgun style architecture makes for open floor plans on all four stories.
All of the main spaces, sandwiched between the garage and utility room and street, are brought to life by the natural light provided by the a new four-story light-well.
On the second floor they created one large continuous space complete with multiple seating areas, a large kitchen, and a dining room that accommodates 14, as the homeowners routinely host neighborhood dinners on Sundays.


The House in Harutzim

Permalink - Posted on 2018-10-15 22:32

The House in Harutzim In the township of Harutzim, on a long rectangular plot, Ravit Dvir architecture planned and designed a house with a double central space with a green patio area at its heart. The owners sought to build a new and modernist house, including a slate roof, a 260 sq.m. on a narrow plot of land. Ravit Dvir architecture designed the building using clean, clear and simple lines, integrating materials such as wood, iron, light-colored plaster and dark windows. These combined with the slate roof frame the exterior as if it was a picture looking inward to the house. According to the municipality’s requirement for two-family homes, this house was only partially connected to its neighboring townhouse--thus creating a visual separation between the two buildings that, while sharing a wall, highly differ in character. The front door to this home is located on the depth of the lot, and includes a large window that faces into the kitchen. The door opens to a patio garden filled with greenery that allows natural light to enter the house. The plan and function of the front door creates a separation of spaces while maintaining a strong visual connection between them. The ground floor includes a dining area, a kitchen and living room that face a large backyard. The front of the house includes a service area, a study and a family room. The heart of the home, however, is the kitchen, in which a large cooking island is situated. It overlooks the open space as well as the double space that connects the two floors of the house. A steel staircase rises from the double space and leads the visitor to the second floor where the bedrooms are located. A steel bridge alongside a library connects the parents’ wing to the children’s wing. The façade facing the street is quiet and reserved. Its bottom part is covered with wooden slats that conceal the windows of the service area. In the back façade, a large scale window with a thick rim overlooks the backyard. The sides of this window are characterized by folded glass that creates a light and breezy appearance. In the yard, a floating pergola made of steel and wood creates a visual separation between the floors-- above it is the large vitrine of the parents’ section while below there is a wooden deck that is used for lounging and hosting. The yard is spacious and contains a variety of vegetation and flora, a herb garden and a spacious lawn where the children can run and play. Architecture: Ravit Dvir Architecture and Design Home styling: Ravit Dvir & Ron From Photography: Oded Smadar https://www.dvir.co.il

Architecture: Ravit Dvir Architecture and Design
Ravit Dvir Architecture and Design
Ravit Dvir Architecture and Design
Ravit Dvir Architecture and Design
Ravit Dvir Architecture and Design


Consell de Cent St, Eixample District

Permalink - Posted on 2018-10-15 22:30

Remodelled House


Los Altos New Residence

Permalink - Posted on 2018-10-15 22:24

Klopf Architecture and Outer space Landscape Architects designed a new warm, modern, open, indoor-outdoor home in Los Altos, California. Inspired by mid-century modern homes but looking for something completely new and custom, the owners, a couple with two children, bought an older ranch style home with the intention of replacing it. Created on a grid, the house is designed to be at rest with differentiated spaces for activities; living, playing, cooking, dining and a piano space. The low-sloping gable roof over the great room brings a grand feeling to the space. The clerestory windows at the high sloping roof make the grand space light and airy. Upon entering the house, an open atrium entry in the middle of the house provides light and nature to the great room. The Heath tile wall at the back of the atrium blocks direct view of the rear yard from the entry door for privacy. The bedrooms, bathrooms, play room and the sitting room are under flat wing-like roofs that balance on either side of the low sloping gable roof of the main space. Large sliding glass panels and pocketing glass doors foster openness to the front and back yards. In the front there is a fenced-in play space connected to the play room, creating an indoor-outdoor play space that could change in use over the years. The play room can also be closed off from the great room with a large pocketing door. In the rear, everything opens up to a deck overlooking a pool where the family can come together outdoors. Wood siding travels from exterior to interior, accentuating the indoor-outdoor nature of the house. Where the exterior siding doesn’t come inside, a palette of white oak floors, white walls, walnut cabinetry, and dark window frames ties all the spaces together to create a uniform feeling and flow throughout the house. The custom cabinetry matches the minimal joinery of the rest of the house, a trim-less, minimal appearance. Wood siding was mitered in the corners, including where siding meets the interior drywall. Wall materials were held up off the floor with a minimal reveal. This tight detailing gives a sense of cleanliness to the house. The garage door of the house is completely flush and of the same material as the garage wall, de-emphasizing the garage door and making the street presentation of the house kinder to the neighborhood. The house is akin to a custom, modern-day Eichler home in many ways. Inspired by mid-century modern homes with today’s materials, approaches, standards, and technologies. The goals were to create an indoor-outdoor home that was energy-efficient, light and flexible for young children to grow. This 3,000 square foot, 3 bedroom, 2.5 bathroom new house is located in Los Altos in the heart of the Silicon Valley. Klopf Architecture Project Team: John Klopf, AIA, and Chuang-Ming Liu 
Landscape Architect: Outer space Landscape Architects 
Structural Engineer: ZFA Structural Engineers 
Staging: Da Lusso Design 
Photography ©2018 Mariko Reed 
Location: Los Altos, CA
 Year completed: 2017


Minimalist Urban Residence

Permalink - Posted on 2018-10-15 22:21

This private residence was designed for a young, creative entrepreneur. The structure maximizes natural light through an abundance of fixed and sliding glass, including skylights throughout the 3 bedroom, 2 bath home. A simple material palette of ipe and white stucco was selected for the exterior, while the interior is warmed with custom walnut cabinetry, italian marble and brass fixtures. The home is modestly sized (2500 sq ft) and was designed with the region’s temperate climate in mind. Sliding doors and operable windows throughout the home offer limitless opportunities for ventilation while creating a true connection between the indoors and outdoors in every room. Operable sliding glass spans the entire width of the kitchen/dining/living room area, so on a warm sunny day, the home becomes completely open to the elements. Radiant heat cement floors and two indoor fireplaces provide warmth on cooler days. The home was designed with the owner’s affinity for entertaining in mind. Upon entering the minimalist home, guests are greeted with an uninterrupted view of the home’s gardens and outdoor fire pit, where friends and family are known to gather every weekend for a glass of wine or bbq.