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8 Stellar Rentals For Your Next Visit to Seattle

Permalink - Posted on 2018-02-16 22:32

Travel in style to the Emerald City with one of these well designed accommodations.

The largest urban hub in the Pacific Northwest, Seattle is an enticing travel destination that offers iconic landmarks (like the Space Needle) and hidden gems (such as the Fremont Vintage Mall) alike. Seattle is also a great launchpad for day trips to Mount Rainier, Snoqualmie Falls, or the wineries of Woodinville. 

If you’re headed to Seattle anytime soon, check out these great digs you can book today.

Large Farmhouse-Style Hideaway

Average price: $7,289 for 7 nights 

This 4,000-square-foot, modern farmhouse home has four levels, six bedrooms, and can comfortably sleep up to 21 guests. The property, which  includes a fully fenced 4,800-square-foot yard with a barbecue and play area for children, is perfect for large groups and families. | Book Now  

Courtesy of TripAdvisor Rentals

One-Bedroom Retreat in Downtown Seattle 

Available on home exchange website Love Home Swap, you can trade in your home for this condo apartment between the retail core and the city center. A stay at the apartment will also allow you access to the condo’s lap pool, gym, hot tub, and sauna. Love Home Swap offers a home exchange membership program that will allow members first dibs of the home, though renting is also an option. | Book Now 

Courtesy of Love Swap Home


Lofted City Center Studio 

Also available through Love Swap Home is this compact, loft-style studio apartment has an exposed brick wall in the kitchen and bedroom. | Book Now

Courtesy of Love Swap Home

Little House on Wheels

Average price $145 per night 

Located in a peaceful neighborhood in West Seattle, near grocery stores, a Sunday farmers market, restaurants, and shops, this tiny home on wheels, fully fitted with warm wood, has a loft that sleeps two, and an enclosed shower and toilet. | Book Now 

Courtesy of VRBO

Loews Hotel 1000, Seattle

Average price: visit site for rates and availability 

Freshly revamped and renamed Loews Hotel 1000, Seattle, this waterfront property has 120 newly designed guest rooms with a palette of soft grays, rich greens, and rose, and artwork inspired by the topography of the city. | Book Now

Courtesy of Loews Hotels

Three-Bedroom House With Pops of Red

Average price $204 per night 

Just three miles away from downtown Seattle, this large, modern, three-bedroom house has vibrant pops of red in the kitchen, and a light-filled open-plan living area that opens out to a balcony. | Book Now 

Courtesy of VRBO

Apartment With a Loft Bedroom

Average price $127 per night 

This 923-square-foot, dog-friendly condo apartment has massive windows that bring in plenty of sunlight, a loft bedroom that hangs over the living room, and a modern, fully equipped kitchen. Guests will also have access to the condo’s sky lounge, rooftop terrace, and gym. | Book Now 

Courtesy of VRBO

1950s-Inspired Green Lake Condo 

Average price: $930 for 7 nights 

Located across Green Lake and its surrounding park, this cheerful one-bedroom condo apartment is decked out in 1950s-inspired furniture and décor, and can sleep up to four guests. | Book Now 

Courtesy of TripAdvisor Rentals


Own William Krisel's Palm Springs Pod House For $2.5M

Permalink - Posted on 2018-02-16 20:44

Pioneering architect William Krisel's Tipper-Grundt Residence is a futuristic formation of five connected pods.

Iconic architect William Krisel modernized Southern Californian suburban tract housing and helped solidify Palm Springs as a haven for midcentury modern architecture. Known for using post-and-beam construction, expansive walls of glass, and open floor plans, Krisel also popularized the butterfly roof—a personal trademark now synonymous with Californian suburbs.

An aerial view of

An aerial view of the Pod House

Compass Realty

The Tipper-Grundt Residence, colloquially known as the Pod House, is the only one of Krisel's designs to deviate from his signature style. Made up of five interconnecting pods, the unique five-bedroom, four-and-a-half bath property is now being offered at $2,495,000.

The entry.

The approach to the entry is complete with a pond and waterfall, and the home opens up into a breathtaking space with soaring ceilings.

Compass Realty

                                                                                                                                              Built in 1968, the stylish midcentury home features soaring ceilings, dramatic fireplaces, original white terrazzo and brass inlaid floors, and hand-forged rock walls. The large lot includes an expansive lawn, a pool, a spa, and outdoor entertaining areas complete with two fire pits and a built-in grill. 

Another view of the entry showcasing the interior pod-like design.

A view of the entry showcases the interior pod-like design, hand-forged stone walls, and original white terrazzo and brass inlaid flooring featured throughout the home. 

Compass Realty

Uninterrupted walls of glass in the living area offer views of the Indian Canyons Golf Course, the Disney fountain, and the picturesque mountain range.

Uninterrupted walls of glass in the living area offer views of the Indian Canyons Golf Course, the Disney fountain, and the picturesque mountain range. 

Compass Realty

A view of the open dining and living space.

A view of the open dining and living space

Compass Realty

A central fireplace is the focus of the living area.

A central fireplace is the focus of the living area.

Compass Realty

The home's design provide

The home's design provides cozy nooks at every turn.

Compass Realty

An alternate view of the living space and wood-paneled fireplace.

An alternate view of the living space and wood-paneled fireplace

Compass Realty

The media room.

The media room

Compass Realty

The master bedroom.

The master bedroom

Compass Realty

One of the bedrooms.

One of the bedrooms

Photo: Compass Surveying

The kitchen is super bright and airy thanks f

The kitchen is bright and airy thanks to a skylight. 

Compass Realty

The kitchen.

The updated, state-of-the-art kitchen

Compass Realty

Bathrooms have been updated.
T

The spacious pool and outside entertaining area

Compass Realty

An arial view of the property clearly illustrates the five attached pods.

An aerial view of the property clearly illustrates the five attached pods.

Compass Realty

The floor plan.
T

2587 South Pequeno Circle is now being offered at $2,495,000.

Know of a home for sale or rent that should be featured on Dwell.com? Drop us a line at community@dwell.com.


A Bright Red Island Residence Embraces a Linden Tree

Permalink - Posted on 2018-02-16 19:42

On the island of San Miguel in Portugal's Azores archipelago, a vibrant home wraps around a massive linden tree.

Designed by Portuguese architect Pedro Maurício Borges, Casa Quinta da Tília is 3,148-square-foot family residence that consists of two volumes unfolding in opposite directions. 

A wide, open-air, stone-paved corridor connects two volumes.

A wide, open-air, stone-paved corridor connects two volumes.

Courtesy of FG+SG Fernando Guerra

The volume on the northeastern side of the plot is positioned parallel to the property’s stone wall border, while the volume to the southeast is bent at an angle, and set some distance away from the wall. 

Courtesy of FG+SG Fernando Guerra

The two parts are connected by a wide, open-air, stone-paved corridor with a saltbox roof shelter.

A large Linden tree in the courtyard.

A large linden tree in the courtyard

Courtesy of FG+SG Fernando Guerra

Following a linear arrangement, the two volumes create a reverse Z-formation, with the large, leafy tree nestled in the corner where the two volumes meet.

A wide, open-air, stone-paved corridor with a saltbox roof shelter.

A wide, open-air, stone-paved corridor with a saltbox roof shelter

Courtesy of FG+SG Fernando Guerra

The wooden framed living room, which is located in the southern volume, is fully glazed on two sides, and fitted with four generous skylight windows to flood the interiors with light.

The dining and kitchen.

The dining and kitchen areas

Courtesy of FG+SG Fernando Guerra

On the eastern side, the living room opens out to the yard where the tree sits, and to the west, it looks out to coast.

The tree seems to lean into the highly transparent living room, to become part of the space.

The tree seems to lean into the highly transparent living room as though to become part of the space.

Courtesy of FG+SG Fernando Guerra

The western windows of the living room look out to coast.

The western windows of the living room look out to the coast.

Courtesy of FG+SG Fernando Guerra

The broad skylights not only draw in the wonderful Azores sunshine, but also frame the majestic, parasol-like crown of the linden tree. The highly transparent space almost seems to bring the tree into the house.

A simple, open plan living, dining and kitchen area that almost feels like part of the courtyard outdoors.

A simple, open-plan living, dining, and kitchen area feels connected with the outdoor courtyard.

Courtesy of FG+SG Fernando Guerra

Four generous skylight windows to flood the interiors with light.

Four generous skylights flood the interiors with light.

Courtesy of FG+SG Fernando Guerra

Fully-glazed walls and skylights flood the living space with sunlight.

Fully-glazed walls and skylights flood the living space with light.

Courtesy of FG+SG Fernando Guerra

The walls are painted the same color as the tin roof finishing, which is made from local Japanese cedar wood, a tree used to forest the island in the early 20th century and now well integrated as part of the Azorean landscape.

The walls are painted the same color as the tin roof finishing, which is made from local Cryptomeria wood.

The walls are painted the same color as the tin roof finishing, which is made from local Japanese cedar wood.

Courtesy of FG+SG Fernando Guerra

A bathroom with red walls and ceilings.

A bathroom with red walls and ceilings

Courtesy of FG+SG Fernando Guerra

Pedro Maurício Borges


Project Credits:

Architecture: Pedro Maurício Borges

Structural engineering: José Maria Cymbron

Hydraulic facilities: José Maria Cymbron, Rodrigo Cymbro

Gas installations: António Manuel Brandão da Luz

Air Conditioning: Francisco Laia Gonçalves

Electrical and telecommunications installations, and fire safety: Marco Ávila


Lummis Residence

Permalink - Posted on 2018-02-16 19:23

The new house shares the landscape with the existing elements by occupying the space between them. Our design calls attention to the repetitive nature of bedrooms and baths, as well as the singular nature of the living room, dining room, and kitchen. To ful ll the client’s desire for a motel-like appearance, bedrooms and baths are distributed in a rhythmic sequence. By placing bath volumes out of alignment with bedroom volumes, we created entry alcoves. On the opposite side, this misalignment allows baths to maximize natural light by protruding into the landscape. A linear porch connects the four bedrooms, effectively creating an outdoor hallway. The ceiling of that hallway exposes the structure with which it is made, descending until it covers the master bedroom. This layout allows the southernmost part of the house to rest closest to the ground. We created a vaulted, singular volume for the rooms where the family gathers. The study is located above the kitchen, and as the tallest component of the house, enjoys northern light and sweeping views. With almost every room in the house having a door to the exterior, the “front door” is designed in an almost serendipitous way. In determining how to join the motel wing “bunk house” with the family space, we decided not to let them join at all. Leaving an open space between them created a “dog trot.” Purposefully aligned with the most signi cant vista on the property, this outdoor room signi es arrival. A screened porch above the dog trot is accessible from the adjacent living room and bunk house. From the dog trot and the motel hallway, we designed steps leading down to a deck containing a re pit. Although this feature was not initially requested by the clients, it nonetheless has become one of their favorite gathering places.

Outside Porch, Lummis Residence
Lummis Residence
Lummis Residence at Dusk
Lummis Residence at Dawn


Top 5 Homes of the Week With Bewitching Backyards

Permalink - Posted on 2018-02-16 17:25

The blissful outdoor areas of these homes from the Dwell community are a breath of fresh air. Featuring wooden patios, elevated gardens, and glass pavilions, take a peek at our editor's top picks for backyards that encourage relaxation.

Featured homes were submitted by members of the Dwell community through our Add a Home feature. Add your home to Dwell.com/homes today.


1. Capitol Hill House

Architect: SHED Architecture + Design, Location: Seattle, Washington

From the architect: "The homeowners came from a culture with a tradition of courtyard houses so creating comfortable outdoor spaces with free-flowing connections to the interior living areas was paramount. The social family chef wanted the kitchen to occupy a central and commanding position in the house with easy access to the backyard patio."

Photo: Rafael Soldi


2. 1532 House

Architect: Fougeron Architecture, Location: San Francisco, California

From the architect: "The 1532 House has seven outdoor spaces, all with distinct qualities and views. Decks, walkways, and gardens unfurl around the living areas, heightening the visual complexity of the structure and its site."

Garden

Garden

Photo: Richard Barnes


3. Laidley Lookout

Landscape designer: SCULPT Gardens, Location: San Francisco, California

From the landscape designer: "This multi-tiered 'party pad' has five levels that were strategically carved into the hillside for epic views. Out went 400 cubic yards of soil, in came 130 cubic yards of concrete to create the wide board-formed concrete walls. Plants were snuck into every possible corner to soften, create ambience, and screen the city vibes."

Photo: Eric Laignel


4. Mt. Tam House

Architect: CCS Architecture, Location: Mill Valley, California

From the architect: "The site was the inspiration and the guiding element for the architecture: vast views of Mt. Tamalpais, intimate connections to groves of redwood trees, and a steep incline. Given its location, stepping up the hillside and squeezed between redwoods, the home is stratified into three levels. The top floor contains two bedrooms, a home office, and a ramped bridge that leads to an upper yard and pool."

The ramped bridge that leads to an upper yard and pool

The ramped bridge that leads to an upper yard and pool

Photo by Paul Dyer


5. Re-Gen House

Architect: EKAR Architects, Location: Bangkok, Thailand 

From the architect: "A traditional Thai house in general is composed of a variety of small detached-houses in which each small family lives, and a patio in a middle of the houses, which connects each family together. The gap between the swimming pool and the elevated yard allows a tree from the ground floor to grow [and] sunlight to stream through a glass [gardening] pavilion underneath."

Photo by Chalermwat Wongchompoo

Want a chance to be featured? Add your home here!  


The Floating Farmhouse

Permalink - Posted on 2018-02-16 16:44

A 1820s manor home along the edge of a Catskills creek in Eldred, New York, was revamped and transformed into "Floating Farmhouse." The modern, five-room vacation home has a touch of old-world charm, and a double-story wall of glass that frames views of the brook and surrounding apple trees. Featured in Dwell.


Teapots, Kettles, and Coffee Makers We Love

Permalink - Posted on 2018-02-15 00:43

Here at Dwell, we appreciate a fine coffee brew or a warm mug of tea. We've collected some of our favorite teapots, kettles, and coffee percolators to get you going in the morning or to ease you into the night.

Alessi Pulcina Espresso Maker
Espro 32 Ounce Vacuum Insulated Stainless Steel Press
Stelton EM Press Coffee Maker
Menu Kettle Teapot
Fellow Pour Over Stagg Kettle in Copper


A Dramatic Hotel in Northern Italy Is a Hiker's Refuge

Permalink - Posted on 2018-02-16 01:17

Hidden in the alpine region of South Tyrol, Italy, Hotel Bühelwirt is a stunning, modern take on the hiking hotel.

Local practice Pedevilla Architects designed the award-winning Hotel Bühelwirt with thoughtful consideration of light, views and functionality, all towards the goal of creating harmony between nature and the built environment.

Gustav Willeit

Completed in 2017, Hotel Bühelwirt is situated in the alpine region of South Tyrol, an area of northern Italy renowned for its picturesque hikes and breathtaking topography. The darkened wood facade was specially tinted to reflect "the dark green, or often black forest tinge [that] seems to blend nature and topography with the building," say the architects.

Gustav Willeit

Gustav Willeit

Structurally, the 20-room hotel echoes traditional hiking hotels of the region but offers a modern interpretation—a stripped-down translation  punctuated by an asymmetrical saddle roof and diagonally protruding bay windows that respond to climatic conditions. 

Gustav Willeit

Every room in the hotel is oriented toward spectacular mountain views, accentuating the guest's connection to the surrounding landscape. 

Gustav Willeit

The rooms are minimally but elegantly appointed. The design team relied on local resources, such as the rustic warmth of larch wood from neighboring forests. 

Gustav Willeit

The plaster applied to the walls was kept "slightly rough" to reflect the tones of the mountains, once again echoing the local topography.  

Gustav Willeit

The lamps used in guest rooms are handcrafted in pure copper, while the curtains are produced in a local loden factory (loden, from the old German word "lodo" meaning "wool bale," is a woolen fabric produced in the region since the Middle Ages), thus reflecting a strong regional connection to the hotel and its locale. 

Gustav Willeit

Hotel Bühelwirt offers travelers the opportunity to experience a modern interpretation of a traditional hiking lodge, in a setting that can only be called sublime.

Rooms start at €60 (approximately $75) for a standard double room.


Hillside Retreat

Permalink - Posted on 2018-02-16 01:17

On a previously undeveloped hillside one-acre lot, the two have turned in a beautiful 5,000-square-foot structure highlighted by a cedar ceiling, a monolithic cement fireplace column, and vast expanses of glass that provide the homeowner with unimpeded views and bathe the open floor plan with California sunlight. “The goal was to capture views from any vantage point in the house,” says Ohashi, the firm’s principal. “The project was more challenging because of the hilly site, but we did our best to work with the contours of the land.” “The goal was to capture views from any vantage point in the house.” Alan Ohashi, principal, ODS Architecture Hillside Retreat From the outside, the first thing one notices is the striking butterfly roof, which seems to capture the energy of the site’s topography. It also allowed Ohashi and Liang the opportunity for bigger pieces of glass where the roof is at its highest point. “Being on the hillside, the roof let us arch the facades on the uphill and downhill sides higher than we might normally be able to do,” says Ohashi. “So functionally, as well as aesthetically, it gives the house a lot of advantages in terms of more glass area, which means more view and more sunlight.” In terms of view and sunlight, the highlight comes in the form of a south-facing, second-floor wall of glass that opens up the great room to a wrap-around deck. Complete with a 9-foot bi-parting sliding glass door mulled with a bank of large clerestory panels of glass, this expanse seamlessly blurs the transition from the great room/dining room/kitchen inside to the deck. A large west-facing slider opens directly from the dining space to largest portion of the deck, which features a swimming pool. The striking concrete fireplace provides the focal point of the great room. Poured in place from the foundation below all the way to the roof, this concrete behemoth, in juxtaposition with the handsome cedar ceiling and a steel I-beam running the width of home, shows the architects’ love for eye-catching design elements. “We and the owners share a love of ornamental materials,” says Liang, the firm’s design director. “We like to expose them and showcase them – concrete, steel, aluminum. Western Window Systems played a big role in helping that happen.” “We and the owners share a love of ornamental materials.” Alan Ohashi, principal, ODS Architecture The owner of the home, completed in 2017 with the intent of being a place for he and his wife to retire in, has a passion for woodworking, Liang and Ohashi say. Hence, the woodworking studio next to the garage. He also built his own dining room table and bed. Speaking of the bed, it appears in the master suite on the other end of the home. It, too, features its own poured-in-place concrete fireplace as a well as a private wrap-around deck overlooking the surrounding valley. On the east side of the room, a giant sliding glass door opens the room to the deck, while adjacent to the fireplace is a hinged door. A gloriously modern kitchen faces up the hillside with views courtesy of a bank of Western Window Systems clerestory windows running the width of the space. A large set of fixed windows illuminate the wide staircase leading from the ground floor to the main living space upstairs.


6 Integrated Appliances Sure to Make Your Kitchen Super Sleek

Permalink - Posted on 2018-02-16 00:49

If your M.O. is making your kitchen more compact and streamlined, then look no further than these clean-lined options.

The modern, open-concept kitchen has resulted in a growing demand for integrated kitchen appliances that reduce unsightly electrical wirings, and that close the gap between functionality and aesthetics. Not only do built-in appliances keep kitchens tidy, but they also improve coherence between it and the rest of your home, creating a more fluid experience. Here are some of our top picks for integrated appliances that will perfectly at home in a modern kitchen.

Wolf Ovens 

Combining restaurant-level performance with streamlined designs that are ideal for home kitchens, Wolf's M and E series of built-in ovens uses dual convection to control heat and airflow for perfectly cooked meals. 

Courtesy of Matthew Millman

Sub-Zero Undercounter Beverage Chiller

Madison, Wisconsin-based refrigerator brand Sub-Zero has been making high-performance, stylish fridges and freezers for more than 70 years. Some of their most popular products are their undercounter beverage and wine chillers, which fit seamlessly into most islands and cabinetry systems.

Courtesy of Sub-Zero Group, Inc.


Sirius Cooker Hood 

Italian brand Sirius has an impressive selection of well-designed and efficient built-in cooker hoods, such this unobtrusive, circular hood that hovers over a Wolf cooktop in a weekend home in Connecticut. 

Courtesy of Andrea Chu

Miele Coffee Makers 

If you and your family are serious about your coffee, Miele has a smart range of integrated coffee makers that work well with almost any kitchen system. Many of Miele’s built-in models are equipped with patented technologies such as "ComfortDoor," which offers easy access to the bean and water container, drip tray, and waste containers; "CupSensor," which alters the position of the dispenser sprout based on cup size, and a convenient "EasyClick" milk dispensing system. 

Courtesy of Miele

Bosch Dishwashers 

An industry leader of built-in dishwashers, Bosch machines are a good choice for quiet and energy-efficient clean-ups. Bosch dishwashers are available in stainless steel, black, and white finishes that work well in modern kitchens. 

Courtesy of Tom Ross

Camouflaged Refrigerator 

Refrigerators can take up a large section of wall space in your kitchen. If you want to maintain visual and textural continuity with your kitchen walls, conceal the front of your fridge with the same material. An example is this integrated Sub-Zero refrigerator that’s camouflaged behind a charred cedar cladding. 

Courtesy of Daniel Hennessy

 


Life in This Renovated Houseboat Would Be But a Dream

Permalink - Posted on 2018-02-15 23:24

Stealth storage and a color palette borrowed from nature lets this Australian houseboat live larger than its 495 square feet.

For this houseboat's renovation, led by Kate Harry of the Adelaide-based interiors firm Fabrikate, function was critical. Harry started with careful spatial planning of the 46 square meters, or 495 square feet, which included the captain's driving area. Within that petite footprint, she fit a kitchen with an integrated fridge, concealed pantry, and range; dining space for eight; a lounging area and reading nook; two bedrooms with queen-size beds; as well as a bathroom with separate spaces for the shower, toilet, and vanity. Both built-in and vertical storage were integrated to utilize all of the available space.

Vinyl flooring in a soft driftwood color underscores a dining table that can seat up to eight. Harry selected warm leather for the banquette seating for its "texture and timeless patina."

Vinyl flooring in a soft driftwood color underscores a dining table that can seat up to eight. Harry selected warm leather for the banquette seating for its "texture and timeless patina."

Jonathan VDK

While researching houseboat design, Harry and her team "found Australian houseboats [to be] notoriously dark and heavy spaces." Instead, they turned to the houseboat's setting on the Murray River for inspiration, combining a color palette of mint green, white, caramel, and driftwood. 

"Selection of materiality was critical in creating the illusion of more space than the actual footprint of the houseboat," Harry said.

"Selection of materiality was critical in creating the illusion of more space than the actual footprint of the houseboat," Harry said.

Jonathan VDK

Upon visiting the finished design, the Harry and her team were struck by how the project had come together. "The morning sunrise, the reflection of light off the water throughout the interior was truly a memorable moment for us as designers," the designer said. "The houseboat felt completely at one with it's environment." 

Harry said: "The inclusion of Australian product in this design was integral given its context." Kitchen joinery in affordable soft sage laminate sports the leather recessed pull from Made Measure and  timber door hardware from In-Teria.

Harry said: "The inclusion of Australian product in this design was integral given its context." Kitchen joinery in affordable soft sage laminate sports the leather recessed pull from Made Measure and timber door hardware from In-Teria.

Jonathan VDK

Australian paint by Haymes envelopes the interior, including vertical and built-in storage.

Australian paint by Haymes envelopes the interior, including vertical and built-in storage.

Jonathan VDK

A drop zone across from the kitchen run.

A drop zone across from the kitchen run

Jonathan VDK

A hemp rug from Armadillo & Co complements botanical prints from Cloth Fabric.

A hemp rug from Armadillo & Co complements botanical prints from Cloth Fabric.

Jonathan VDK

Sleek storage

Sleek storage

Jonathan VDK

The reading nook

The reading nook

Jonathan VDK

MDF panelling also allowed for contraction and expansion of the moving vessel.

MDF panelling also allowed for contraction and expansion of the moving vessel.

Jonathan VDK

In the bathroom, "Laminex Aquapanel was selected in wet areas to meet the weight restriction and potential of cracking tiles," Harry said.

"Laminex Aquapanel was selected in wet areas to meet the weight restriction and potential of cracking tiles," says Harry.

Jonathan VDK

Bedrooms capitalize on river views and built-in storage.

Bedrooms capitalize on river views and built-in storage.

Jonathan VDK

The stylish hooks in the bedroom were sourced from twenty21, a Melbourne-based shop that specializes in midcentury designs.

The stylish hooks in the bedroom were sourced from twenty21, a Melbourne-based shop that specializes in midcentury designs.

Jonathan VDK

Before:

Courtesy of Fabrikate


Project Credits:

Design: Fabrikate

Stylist: Emily O’Brien 

Structural Engineer: McDowall Engineering and Construction

Cabinetry construction and installation: Module Dezines

Photography: Jonathan VDK 


A Portuguese Glass House Uses Surrounding Foliage as a Privacy Screen

Permalink - Posted on 2018-02-15 20:14

A transparent hillside abode outside Porto swerves around existing trees and takes advantage of the lush canopy for privacy.

Concrete floors and roof contrast with large expanses of glazing.

Inspired by the surrounding landscape of chestnut trees, rocky hillside, and bubbling stream, Portuguese architecture firm 3r Ernesto Pereira chose to blend into, and take advantage of, the local geography rather than fight against it at this sleek, modern home near the coastal city of Porto. At a cost of €100,000 (approximately $125,000) and measuring about 140 square meters, this stunning, wood-and-glass retreat took about four months to construct. 

Cloaked House, as 3r Ernesto Pereira named it, blends into its hillside location.

Cloaked House by 3r Ernesto Pereira blends into its leafy hillside location.

Photo: João Morgado

From the exterior, the residence is long and rectangular, with glazed walls that allow for views out into the woods beyond.  

A large porch projects out from the main building.

A large porch projects from the main building.

Photo: João Morgado

The existing foliage were carefully considered, with niches cut out in the home’s form to preserve extant trees, thus creating outdoor spaces that are surrounded on three sides by the interior of the home, akin to courtyards.

At night, the home glows like a glass jewel box.

At night, the home glows like a glass jewel box.

Photo: João Morgado

Concrete floors and roof contrast with large expanses of glazing.

Concrete floors and roof contrast with large expanses of glazing.

Photo: João Morgado

The roof is the only solid element, but its neutral gray tone allow it to blend into the hillside as well.  

Some of the large planes of glass are sliding doors that open to the outside.

Some of the large planes of glass are sliding doors that open to the environment.

Photo: João Morgado

The roof is the only solid element.

The roof is the only solid element in the residence.

Photo: João Morgado

Bookmatched wood veneer cabinetry brings a warm, tactile feel to the interiors.

Bookmatched wood veneer cabinetry brings a warm, tactile feel to the interiors.

Photo: João Morgado

A neutral palette for furniture keeps the interior feeling light and sun-drenched.

A neutral palette for furniture keeps the interior feeling light and sun-drenched.

Photo: João Morgado

A custom kitchen with a cantilevered countertop mimics the way the house is perched on a hillside, seeming to defy gravity.

A custom kitchen with a cantilevered countertop mimics the way the house is perched on a hillside, seeming to defy gravity.

Photo: João Morgado

In summer, the dense leafiness of the trees engulfs the whole house, making it almost imperceptible while protecting the interior from the intense sun. In winter, the deciduous trees shed their leaves, allowing the sun to penetrate the home and warm up the interiors, which are slightly more visible behind the bare branches.

Light enters the home from all sides, even those which are closest to the hill.

Light enters the home from all sides, even those which are closest to the hill.

Photo: João Morgado

Whether indoors or outdoors, this house lets its residents live both in the forest and with the forest. 

The home has sliding doors with thick wood frames.

The home has sliding doors with thick wood frames.

Photo: João Morgado

Existing trees poke through the large patio.

Existing trees poke through the large patio.

Photo: João Morgado

The home is designed to maneuver around existing trees.

The home is designed to maneuver around existing trees.

Photo: João Morgado

A axonometric of the project shoes its long, rectangular form with cut-outs to preserve existing trees.

A axonometric of the project shows its long, rectangular form with cut-outs to preserve existing trees.

Photo: 3r Ernesto Pereira

The plan of the Cloaked House.

The Cloaked House plan

Photo: 3r Ernesto Pereira


Project Credits: 

Architecture: 3r Ernesto Pereira
Builder/General Contractor: 3r Ernesto Pereira
Structural, Civil, & Sound Engineer: Engitek


Blakely Mid-Century Modern

Permalink - Posted on 2018-02-15 20:12

An Indianapolis couple, with a rich passion in their blood for mid-century modern homes, left a letter in the mailbox of a 1956 home a handful of years ago that they deeply admired, expressing their interest in the property to the existing homeowner. While the mid-century modern home that was designed by architect, Bill Wright, of Vonnegut, Wright and Porteous, was mostly original with only minor renovations completed in 1967, it was a diamond in the rough in the eyes of the interested couple. A few years later, the call and opportunity arose for this couple to purchase the property. After pulling in the best of the best in their respective trades to take a look at the property, it was decided that the home was a complete remodel, only leaving the original brick fireplace wall. Other than that, the home was stripped to the studs considering the number of years that had gone by with little-to-no upkeep. Woodpecker and insect damage warranted a completely new facade, and interior built-ins that were designed during the inception of the 1956 home proved to be too outdated, so the design team went to work to create the home of this couple’s dreams.


A Meticulously Updated Midcentury in L.A. Asks $1.49M

Permalink - Posted on 2018-02-15 19:39

This 1954 post-and-beam residence in Glendale, California, has undergone a considered renovation by Levitt Halsey Design and award-winning architect David Levitt.

1 1954 post-and-beam midcentury home by architect David Lopez.

The hillside neighborhood of Whiting Woods in northern Glendale boasts a number of notable midcentury homes, including John Lautner's Schaffer House, Richard Neutra's Taylor House, and Clair Earl's Daily House

1 1954 post-and-beam midcentury home by architect David Lopez.

Architect David Lopez designed this post-and-beam home in 1954.

Courtesy of Brett Halsey

It is here that lesser known, but much respected Californian midcentury architect David Lopez designed this 2,219-square-foot, post-and-beam house at 3525 El Lado Drive. Built in 1954, the residence is now on the market.

The entrance to the house.

The entrance to the house

Courtesy of Brett Halsey

The well-maintained, three-bedroom, three-bath property was recently renovated by a husband-and-wife team of design consultants, Brett Halsey and Valerie Levitt Halsey of the project consulting firm Levitt Halsey. They collaborated with Valerie’s brother, architect David Levitt of Levitt Architects, and builders Artisan Pacific

The floors of the common areas were fitted in white oak.

The floors of the common areas were fitted in white oak.

Courtesy of Brett Halsey

This is the firm’s second extensive renovation of a midcentury post-and-beam with a slab foundation, and they had to work through certain challenges during its redesign. 

The open-plan living and dining area connects to  an outdoor patio and the pool.

The open-plan living and dining area connects to an outdoor patio and the pool.

Courtesy of Brett Halsey

"Because there is no crawl space above or below, we had to be especially careful when designing the systems and lighting, as there would be little room for correction once the walls and floors were closed. Our goal was to thoroughly update the house while maintaining the timeless beauty of the original design," says Valerie. 

The remodelled kitchen.

The remodeled kitchen

Courtesy of Brett Halsey

The original windows, built-in closets, Malm-style fireplace, and vintage Fleetwood sliders were retained. A new bathroom was added, and the kitchen, along with the other two bathrooms, was reconfigured. The lighting systems and landscaping were updated, and most of the interior fit-outs were replaced. 

A fireplace in the den.

A fireplace in the den adds to the inviting atmosphere.

Courtesy of Brett Halsey

The floors of the common areas were fitted in white oak, and carpets were installed in all the bedrooms. Two of the existing bathrooms were remodeled to include a soaking tub, Japanese tiles, and wood vanities with quartz counters. 

A lounging den with bright pops of color.

A lounging den features bright pops of color.

Courtesy of Brett Halsey

Custom rift oak cabinetry, quartz countertops, and stainless-steel Bosch appliances outfit the new kitchen. Levitt Halsey also added new custom-designed cabinets, which were built by Brian Hollenbeck at Bellwether Millworks.

The owners can access the pool in the backyard via sliding doors in the master bedroom.

The owners can access the pool in the backyard via sliding doors in the master bedroom.

Courtesy of Brett Halsey

"We love midcentury modern houses for their warm, individual, ‘handmade’ feel, and close connection to the outdoors, so we tried to find new materials that reinforce these qualities while still bringing everything up to date," says Valerie. 

The floors of the bedrooms are all carpeted.

The floors of the bedrooms are all carpeted.

Courtesy of Brett Halsey

The refreshed house also includes a large rectangular pool that runs along the back of the property, and several new skylights that work with the existing floor-to-ceiling windows to further strengthen the connectivity between indoors and outdoors. 

A skylight brightens one of the new bathrooms.

A skylight brightens one of the new bathrooms.

Courtesy of Brett Halsey

Claudia Desbiens of Modern Mecca is responsible for the staging of the home.

Valerie is also the property’s broker, and interested parties can contact her to find out more. 

The back view of 3525 El Lado Drive.
An outdoor patio where the owners can enjoy some Californian sunshine after a swim.

An outdoor patio allows the owners to sunbathe after swimming.

Courtesy of Brett Halsey

3525 El Lado Drive is asking $1,499,000. See the listing here.

Know of a home for sale or rent that should be featured on Dwell.com? Drop us a line at community@dwell.com.


A Couple's Denver Residence Makes Clever Use of a Narrow Plot

Permalink - Posted on 2018-02-15 01:33

Moving from Lake Michigan, a savvy couple builds a dream home that's also a wise investment.

“Considering all of the foot traffic around their property, [the owners] made it very clear that they wanted to find a way to maintain as much privacy in the home as possible,” architect Chad Mitchell says of this Denver home. “Thus, the main floor of the home is elevated from the sidewalk by about six feet.” The exterior siding is red cedar with a custom Sherwin-Williams stain.

A couple with grown children might seem like a strange match for Denver's up-and-coming Lower Highlands neighborhood. The area flourished in the last decade, becoming a trendy hub of mixed-use developments. The husband, who owns a real estate investment and development firm, agreed with his wife that the growing potential of Lower Highlands was a wise setting—and investment—for their new lives. Unlike their old family home off Lake Michigan, this dwelling would be designed with their wants in mind. 

“Considering all of the foot traffic around their property, [the owners] made it very clear that they wanted to find a way to maintain as much privacy in the home as possible,” architect Chad Mitchell says of this Denver home. “Thus, the main floor of the home is elevated from the sidewalk by about six feet.” The exterior siding is red cedar with a custom Sherwin-Williams stain.

"Considering all of the foot traffic around their property, [the owners] made it very clear that they wanted to find a way to maintain as much privacy in the home as possible," architect Chad Mitchell says of this Denver home. "Thus, the main floor of the home is elevated from the sidewalk by about six feet." The exterior siding is red cedar with a custom Sherwin-Williams stain.

Photo:

Architect Chad Mitchell of Meridian 105 Architecture introduced them to a site not far from the Highland Bridge, and he designed an open-concept property that showed the versatility of modern architecture.

"It was important to us that this structure…stand on its own two feet as a quality building with integrity both in the building form and in the materials," Mitchell said. An open plan helped ameliorate the effects of the home's narrow plot—only 28 feet—and 6-foot elevation allowed for more privacy. But the couple didn’t want to be completely left alone: their daughter, an interior designer, helped her parents with furnishings. 

Mitchell says that the red cedar “provided a nice level of contrast from the white siding on top and helps to establish those two spaces as distinctly separate.” The siding is from James Hardie.

Mitchell says that the red cedar "provided a nice level of contrast from the white siding on top and helps to establish those two spaces as distinctly separate." The siding is from James Hardie.

Photo:

“Because the property is so narrow, we had to be strategic in laying out the plan,” Mitchell says. “Our goal was to create an open plan that spanned from exterior wall to exterior wall in order to make the home feel as large as possible.” Solid oak flooring fills the space and pendants from Kenroy Home illuminate the kitchen.

"Because the property is so narrow, we had to be strategic in laying out the plan," Mitchell says. "Our goal was to create an open plan that spanned from exterior wall to exterior wall in order to make the home feel as large as possible." Solid oak flooring fills the space and pendants from Kenroy Home illuminate the kitchen.

Photo:

Mitchell wanted to detail the solid oak staircase with that same sense of openness, even though its materials are heavy. “We used a lot of raw steel and wood on the interior of the home,” Mitchell said. “This carries the authenticity of real materials from the building exterior to the building interior.” A custom fireplace sits on the patio.

Mitchell wanted to detail the solid oak staircase with that same sense of openness, even though its materials are heavy. "We used a lot of raw steel and wood on the interior of the home," Mitchell said. "This carries the authenticity of real materials from the building exterior to the building interior." A custom fireplace sits on the patio.

Photo:

Since this home was primarily for the couple, rather than their grown children, they wanted a luxurious master bedroom. A Kichler fan circulates air above the bed.

Since this home was primarily for the couple, rather than their grown children, they wanted a luxurious master bedroom. A Kichler fan circulates air above the bed.

Photo:

Carrara marble was used in the shower and on the countertops. The fixtures are from Hansgrohe.

Carrara marble was used in the shower and on the countertops. The fixtures are from Hansgrohe.

Photo:

“We were concerned that by elevating the first floor by six feet, we would be detaching the living space from the neighborhood,” Mitchell says. “Thus, we have an elevated exterior patio off of the rear that overlooks the sidewalk and brings the living space to the outdoors.”

"We were concerned that by elevating the first floor by six feet, we would be detaching the living space from the neighborhood," Mitchell says. "Thus, we have an elevated exterior patio off of the rear that overlooks the sidewalk and brings the living space to the outdoors."

Photo:

Apart from a “generous” master bedroom, Mitchell says that the couple also wanted a rooftop deck to see views of downtown Denver. A sloped roof kept the building up to code, and the outdoor deck “was achieved by shifting the upper volume backwards from the front of the house,” he says.

Apart from a "generous" master bedroom, Mitchell says that the couple also wanted a rooftop deck to see views of downtown Denver. A sloped roof kept the building up to code, and the outdoor deck "was achieved by shifting the upper volume backwards from the front of the house," he says.

Photo:


A Tiny Apartment in the Italian Riviera Takes Cues From Nautical Design

Permalink - Posted on 2018-02-15 01:19

Inspired by the region's maritime roots, this 377-square-foot unit hides the bedroom behind a crafty plywood storage system.

A cabinetry wall  is constructed with marine plywood.

Like much of the Italian Riviera, La Spezia on the Ligurian coast has a long maritime history. It was precisely this seafaring legacy that inspired the design of this tiny home, a 377-square-feet apartment that was reconfigured to clearly separate the living and sleeping areas.

When the doors are shut, the sleeping areas are completely concealed.

When the doors are shut, the sleeping areas are completely concealed.

Courtesy of Anna Positano

To meet his brief, Luca Scardulla and Federico Robbiano of Genoan firm llabb created a marine plywood cabinetry wall with storage spaces that are similar to the kind found inside sailboats. 

A cabinetry wall  is constructed with marine plywood.

A cabinetry wall is constructed from marine plywood.

Courtesy of Anna Positano

Camouflaged within this wall of storage, the bedroom entrance blends in with the joinery. Llabb did the carpentry work for this wall themselves, and finished it with white and blue laminate. 

A small kitchenette and dining room is located the the windows.

A kitchenette and dining room

Courtesy of Anna Positano

The bathroom is located on one side of the entry corridor, and a kitchenette, which is also fitted with blue and white laminated plywood, is located on the opposite side of the length of the bathroom wall. 

The master bedroom has ribbed ceilings and walls that recall nautical frames.

The master bedroom has ribbed ceilings and walls that recall nautical frames.

Courtesy of Anna Positano

The cabin-like bedroom contains a king-sized bed and minimalist built-in shelves.

The cabin-like bedroom contains a king-size bed and minimalist, built-in shelves.

Courtesy of Anna Positano

In the master bedroom, the ceiling and walls are wrapped in structural wooden ribs that recall ship frames. Designed to feel like a cozy cabin, this bedroom contains a king-size bed and minimalist, built-in shelves.

At one corner of the cabinet wall, a short flight of steps, shaped like a boat ladder, leads to another closet-like door that opens to a small portico.

At one corner of the cabinet wall, a short flight of steps, shaped like a boat ladder, leads to another closet-like door that opens to a small portico.

Courtesy of Anna Positano

At one corner of the cabinet wall, a short flight of steps, shaped like a boat ladder, leads to another closet-like door that opens to a small portico. From here, another short, steep flight of stairs leads up to a compact, mansard sleeping loft.

A boat ladder style step leads up to a small portico.

A boat ladder-style step leads up to a small portico.

Courtesy of Anna Positano

Located directly above the master bedroom, this sleeping loft has "windows" (which, from the perspective of the living area, look like part of the cabinet wall), and looks down to the living room and kitchen.

Courtesy of llabb

"The nautical culture that characterizes this region in Italy was fundamental to the development of this project," says llabb founder Luca Scardulla. "The optimization of storage spaces inside sailboats and the minimum dimensions within these spaces served as our inspiration."

Courtesy of llabb


Project Credits:

Architecture and interior design: llabb

Builder: Zena Costruzioni

Photography: Anna Positano 


A-Frame Haus

Permalink - Posted on 2018-02-15 00:53

This cozy A-frame is the perfect getaway! Come relax, ski, bike, hike, or simply enjoy time with family & friends. The beautifully remodeled open kitchen and living area make for an excellent gathering place. There is a panoramic view of everything great that Utah has to offer; red rock, calming streams, lush greenery, and incredible mountain views. Simply step outside to endless outdoor activities. Come enjoy a peaceful environment with easy access to restaurants and downtown.


6 Modern Modular Homes We Love in Colorado

Permalink - Posted on 2018-02-14 23:09

From repurposed shipping containers to cabin retreats, we look at a range of prefabricated, modular homes in Colorado.

Boasting a thrilling topography that ranges from deep canyons to alpine mountains, and arid plains to rolling dunes, the state of Colorado offers an equally broad variety of modern, weather-appropriate prefab homes. Here, we review some of our favorite modular homes in this outdoorsy destination.

TrailerWrap by University of Colorado Students & Michael Hughes

Michael Hughes and his University of Colorado collaborators transformed a 10-by-47-foot trailer destined for the landfill into the striking TrailerWrap “rehab” prototype.
Colorado Modular Homes, along with their partner company, Rocky Mountain Home Builders, specializes in custom high-quality modular homes in Colorado. By using several different off-site construction methods, the company is able to provide homeowners with a range of styles and finishes, depending on the level of customization.

Colorado Modular Homes, along with their partner company, Rocky Mountain Home Builders, specializes in custom, high-quality modular homes in Colorado. By using several different off-site construction methods, the company is able to provide homeowners with a range of styles and finishes, depending on the level of customization.

Colorado Modular Homes

This mountain cabin by Liscott Custom Homes was designed as a three-bedroom, 3 bathroom custom build home for a family in Silverthorne, Colorado. At 2,400 square feet, the home is clad in contrasting horizontal and board and batten siding coated in a dark blue-gray finish.

This mountain cabin by Liscott Custom Homes was designed as a three-bedroom, three-bath custom home for a family in Silverthorne, Colorado. Measuring 2,400 square feet, the home is clad in contrasting horizontal and board and batten siding coated in a dark, blue-gray finish.

Courtesy of Liscott Custom Homes

Within the 1500 square feet of this residence, the Denver, Colorado-based architecture firm Tomecek Studio implemented environmentally sensitive strategies including recycled materials, green roofs and photovoltaics. The residence is anchored by an existing rock outcropping and takes full advantage of the distant ridge views to the south. The main floor includes two shipping containers that saddlebag a wedge shaped space. The containers hold the function of bedrooms, bath, office, laundry and kitchen while the center space is used for entry, dining, and living. The upper floor is an open loft with a platform bed that slides on tracks outdoors as a reference to the quintessential camping experience.

Within the 1500 square feet of this residence, the Denver, Colorado-based architecture firm Tomecek Studio implemented environmentally sensitive strategies including recycled materials, green roofs, and photovoltaics. The residence is anchored by an existing rock outcropping and takes full advantage of the distant ridge views to the south. The main floor includes two shipping containers that saddlebag a wedge-shaped space. The containers hold the function of bedrooms, bath, office, laundry, and kitchen, while the center space is used for entry, dining, and living. The upper floor is an open loft with a platform bed that slides on tracks outdoors as a reference to the quintessential camping experience.

Braden Gunem

Siting closely within the surrounding pine forest, the Weehouse designed by Alchemy Architects and constructed by Irontown Homes rest only one half hour up the mountain from Boulder, CO.The tight driveway and secluded mountainside locale created an interesting delivery in which the modules were lifted by crane over the treetops and set into place. The pre-finished steel siding has been joined by a special fire protective shell due to lying in a high risk fire zone. The plethora of windows allow for natural sunlight to illuminate the warm, open interior.

Siting closely within the surrounding pine forest, the Weehouse designed by Alchemy Architects and constructed by Irontown Homes rest only one half hour up the mountain from Boulder, Colorado. The tight driveway and secluded mountainside locale created an interesting delivery in which the modules were lifted by crane over the treetops and set into place. The pre-finished steel siding has been joined by a special fire-protective shell due to lying in a high-risk fire zone. The plethora of windows allow for natural sunlight to illuminate the warm, open interior.

Courtesy of Alchemy Architects

The Outward Bound cabins' steel frames lift the structures above a three-foot snowpack while supporting corrugated-steel "snow roofs."

The Outward Bound cabins, designed by the University of Colorado Denver's design-build program, have steel frames that lift the structures above a three-foot snowpack while supporting corrugated-steel "snow roofs." The 14 cabins have prefabricated structures to reduce on-site build time.

Photo:

Based in Poncha Springs, Colorado, Great Western Homes designs and builds a range of homes that have a modern, rustic edge. By mixing materials -- wood, weathered steel, and a standing seam metal roof, this residence is a modern take on a classic cabin, with steeply pitched roofs for shedding snow.

Based in Poncha Springs, Colorado, Great Western Homes designs and builds a range of homes that have a modern, rustic edge. By mixing materials—wood, weathered steel, and a standing seam metal roof—this residence is a modern take on a classic cabin, with steeply pitched roofs for shedding snow.

Courtesy of Great Western Homes


A Costa Rican Family Stays Connected in Three Shipping Container Homes

Permalink - Posted on 2018-02-14 22:05

These eco-friendly shipping container homes allow three young adult children to be independent while staying close to family.

Three environmentally friendly container homes.

To give their young adult children the independence they need, a couple in Costa Rica decided to build three tiny homes on the same Santa Ana property that holds the main house, which they’ve been living in for the last 20 years. 

Franceschi Container Houses are three independent living units totaling 2,260-square-feet, built from used, 40-foot high cargo containers placed side by side.

The family, all of whom love and respect nature, wanted to expand their living quarters, so the children would have their own space and privacy. 

The kitchen, and a staircase that leads up to the bedroom.

The kitchen and a staircase that leads up to the bedroom

Courtesy of Carolina Bello and Pablo Franceschi

Architecture firms Re Arquitectura and Dao and Rebec collaborated to offer the family an affordable, eco-friendly solution in the form of the Franceschi Container Houses: three independent living units totaling 2,260 square feet, built from used, 40-foot-high shipping containers placed side by side. Strategically positioned, the containers get the best quality of natural light and cross ventilation available on the site.

Small front patios connect the houses to their environment.

Small front patios connect the houses to their environment.

Courtesy of Carolina Bello and Pablo Franceschi

The three units share the same floor plan, and are raised upon concrete columns. This ensures that the construction impact on the terrain is minimal, and the soil beneath them can aerate and absorb rainwater as it did before. 

The space between the ground and the floor of the house also helps to keep the interiors naturally cool and dry, thus saving on expenses that would otherwise be needed for insulation and waterproofing.

The stairwell leading from the living areas on the ground level, up to the upper level bedroom.

The stairwell leads from the living areas on the ground level to the upper-level bedroom.

Courtesy of Carolina Bello and Pablo Franceschi

Each unit is split into two levels. On the first level are the kitchen, dining, and living areas, which connect to a backyard patio. On the second level, each of the houses has a bathroom and a bedroom that looks out to gorgeous views of hills and the Uruca river canyon to the south. 

Three environmentally friendly container homes.

Three environmentally friendly container homes

Courtesy of Adam Baker

The architects managed their resources well, and made full use of all available local materials, wasting as little as possible during the building process. 

The front facing side of the container house.

A front view of the container house

Courtesy of Carolina Bello and Pablo Franceschi

They chose low-impact materials such as plantation woods and water-based paints and varnishes, installed solar heaters, and applied passive climate control strategies to circumvent the need for air conditioning. 

The bedroom with built-in storage along the wall.

The bedroom with built-in storage along the wall

Courtesy of Carolina Bello and Pablo Franceschi

For the sewage system, they used a double-stage septic tank that is equipped with a filter that treats all the wastewater before draining it back into the ground. 

A versatile and mobile table with rollers.

A versatile table with rollers

Courtesy of Carolina Bello and Pablo Franceschi

Because the units are small, the interiors were customized with mobile furniture in the living areas, and wall storage systems in the bedrooms. This creates spaces that are versatile and flexible enough to adapt to the adult children's future needs. 

The front door to the units.

The front door to the units

Courtesy of Carolina Bello and Pablo Franceschi

The wood and metal waste from the construction of the houses were saved and reused to make the furniture, lamps, doors and door handles, staircase handrails, bath accessories, planters, and hangers. 

A split thread staircase leads up to the bedroom.

A split thread staircase leads up to the bedroom.

Courtesy of Carolina Bello and Pablo Franceschi

The result is a striking, modern, sustainable home system that encourages both independence and a strong sense of family. 

Franceschi Container Houses

Franceschi Container Houses

Re Arquitectura

Cross section of Franceschi Container Houses

Cross section of Franceschi Container Houses

Re Arquitectura


Project Credits: 

Architecture, interior and lighting design: Re Arquitectura, Dao and Rebec 

Structural engineering: CDS Ingenieria 

Electric engineering: Ing. Max Ruiz Arrieta 

Steel structures: Taller de Precision Chang y Ugarte 


This Spectacular Suffolk Barn Conversion Hits the Market at $1.26M

Permalink - Posted on 2018-02-14 20:39

Acclaimed London practice Buckley Gray Yeoman converted this spacious, Victorian barn and cart shed for rustic-modern living.

Preserving the spaciousness and volume of the original timber-framed barn, the 2005 renovation carried out Buckley Gray Yeoman "sought out to respect the industrial heritage of the building whilst also providing a contemporary house," says architect Richard Buckley. "The combination of old and new was brought together through careful planning."

The main house is a converted barn.

The main house is a converted barn. 

The Modern House

Located in Thornham Magna, a small village in a rural Suffolk about a two-hour drive from London, the property incorporates two buildings—the converted barn, and a converted cart shed opposite. The structures are set on a large, picturesque site of approximately two-and-a-half acres complete with a formally landscaped, walled-in garden at the front of the property. The rest of the plot has been kept as open parkland, as it would have been back when it was part of the surrounding Thornham Estate. 

Additional glazing was added to the structure to increase the natural light.

Additional glazing was added to the structure to increase the natural light. 

The Modern House

The main barn is arranged over two floors, with plenty of impressive double-height space, a chic black exterior, and floor-to-ceiling glazing. 

An exterior stone wall surrounds the property.

An exterior stone wall surrounds the property.

The Modern House

The entrance hall leads into an open-plan kitchen and dining space that overlooks a walled garden. The towering ceiling gives the interiors a lofty feel. 

The full height glazing amplifies the airy sense of interior space.

The full-height glazing amplifies the interior's airy, industrial vibe. 

The Modern House

The walled in garden.

The walled-in garden

The Modern House

Also on the ground floor are three bedrooms, a study, and a utility room. The main living room is on the upper level, along with the master bedroom, which features an ensuite bathroom

Exposed beams make for a rustic-chic interior.

Exposed beams make for a rustic-chic interior.

The Modern House

One of the bedrooms.

One of the bedrooms 

The Modern House

The open kitchen.

The open kitchen and dining area

The Modern House

The striking juxtaposition of wood and glass.

The converted barn home exhibits a striking juxtaposition of wood and glass. 

The Modern House

A walkway leads across the upper level.

A walkway leads across the upper level. 

The Modern House

Simple farmhouse bedroom style.

A simple farmhouse-style bedroom.

The Modern House

The second structure is a former cart shed that is also arranged over two floors. The ground floor houses a workshop, storage, and garage space, while the upper level is divided into living area with a bedroom, a bathroom, and a large open plan kitchen/living/dining room ideal for guests. 

The exterior stone wall.

The exterior stone wall

Photo: Niche Modern

.There are 21 solar panels on the roof of the former cartshed (on the left).

There are 21 solar panels on the roof of the former cart shed that sits behind the main house.

The Modern House

The thoughtfully renovated barn home is listed for £899,999, or approximately $1,260,000, via The Modern House.

Know of a home for sale or rent that should be featured on Dwell.com? Drop us a line at community@dwell.com. 


Harkavy House

Permalink - Posted on 2018-02-14 19:20

The Martin R. and Lillian Harkavy House (1957) Architect Paul Rudolph Addition (2006) John Quinn  Originally a two-bedroom, two-bath beach house with a carport, featuring exposed rafters, floor-to-ceiling sliding wooden window privacy screen panels and terrazzo floors. The 7-foot entry opens up to the almost 1,000-square-foot great room with 15-foot ceiling. All around the house's exterior, distinctive columns carry the visual line from roof to ground, ending in concrete spheres that look like exclamation points. The 2006 vertical addition by architect John Quinn added a two-story master bedroom and converted the carport into a garage. The house is now 2,936 square feet. ––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– The following 2013 interview with Susan Harkavy (SH), daughter of Martin and Lillian Harkavy, was conducted by Joe King (JK), architect and co-author of "Paul Rudolph: The Florida Houses". Joe needed more background information as he prepared to give a talk and tour of the Harkavy House to the Frank Lloyd Wright Building Conservancy and Sarasota Architectural Foundation members. JK: Please give me a sense of what it was like to live in the Harkavy house. What were the strengths and drawbacks of living in such an open design, so little storage, etc. SH: We moved there when I was one year old, and I lived there until I was 18, so I never knew anything different until I went to New England for college. It was only after I moved that I had the perspective to understand how unique the house was. The first thing I understood about the house was the LIGHT. The white terrazzo floors, white ceiling, white dining table, the sliding glass doors to the porch, the sliding glass windows upstairs, the ability to laterally slide open the east and west two-story walls, all helped to create extraordinary light. You ask about the open design. After I moved to college up north, crammed like a sardine with 3 other roommates in a space the size of a closet, I understood viscerally how open space affects you (especially after you no longer have it). What had been unconscious for me became gradually more conscious, and I started selecting art history courses about modernism (because it was familiar to me). Little did I know that I would major in the subject, and veer into it as a career. Paul Rudolph's rigorous design had such a profound impact on me growing up that I became a sworn modernist and focused on it in my professional PR practice. http://www.susanharkavy.com/ You may not realize it, but there was a ton of storage. Rudolph thought of everything. The built-in cabinetry in the living room and kitchen, and above the kitchen (under the Shoji screens) offered clever and efficient storage. In the 1957 color photo, all those wooden rectangular cabinets behind the sofa held serving pieces, tableware, linens and barware. In the center unit, a bar slid out horizontally and all the liquor was stowed below. In the kitchen Rudolph incorporated a pantry closet, and to its left, another minimal but cool space where you could stand and have your coffee like they do in Italy. Above the kitchen were large-size cabinets where we stored winter blankets, Christmas ornaments and gift wrap. You can also slightly see, on the left of the color photo, some of the media unit, which was amazing. Everything you could hope for if you were a music lover (which Dad was) and all the books had their own homes above it. My bedroom closet was a walk-in, with plenty of space for all my clothes, dolls, toys, luggage, art supplies, puzzles and the occasional ceramic mugs I made in summer camp.  I'd also like to mention the tie-in with nature. The driveway was covered in small stones, and had beautiful trees in square planters. There was a Japanese garden under the stairs with a fountain. There was a beautiful rectangle of green grass where the pool is now. And you could open up the walls to the gardens on both sides. Even if the walls were closed, you could see the back garden past the porch. This was all a very carefully planned way to soften the rigidity of the geometry. More recent owners have added those thick walls in the garden. Rudolph loved sliding everything laterally. The east and west walls, the Shoji panels, the cabinet doors, the glass doors to the porch, the glass windows in the upstairs bedrooms. The repetition of ideas (of course he also repeated squares and rectangles) made the house feel very grounded and secure to me. JK: I loved living in the two bedroom Bennett Residence designed by Ralph Twitchell and Paul Rudolph in 1949 in Bradenton, FL for many years, so I'm familiar with living in these houses. What was your point of view as a child, and what about your parents? SH: I loved it. I played jacks on the open expanse of terrazzo floor. I listened to records in the living room because the acoustics were great. You could see the whole house from the top of the stairs. It was always very comfortable, temperature wise. The porch was enormous and there was so much open floor space to play on.  My mother loved it. She got a degree in interior design from the NY School of Interior Design just before they moved to Sarasota; she was the one who proposed commissioning Rudolph, and my dad supported it. I never discussed the house with my parents as a child, though I remember the Esto (Ezra Stoller) photos were taken for a 1959-60-ish story in Look Magazine. JK: As I think of my architectural clients today, its hard to imagine them going along with such a minimal, yet elegant, pavilion design to be used for day-to-day living. In other words, I think of your parents as very special clients. Can you help me understand them a little better? SH: My parents were both New Yorkers beforehand. Mom delighted in the energy, glamour, arts and international pizazz of NYC, and had that degree in interior design, so if she were going to leave NYC and move to a small town with heat, humidity, large water bugs and sand getting into everything, then dammit, she was going to have a fantastic house conceived by this gifted talent who had studied with Gropius at Harvard. She knew it would be amazing, and she was thrilled. And I think Dad was happy to support her in that. Don't forget that coming from NYC where apartments are typically small, this house did not seem like a sacrifice of space to them. About ten years ago I spoke to Bert Brosmith (Rudolph’s project architect in Sarasota) about working with my parents, and he remembered them as being very enthusiastic and adventurous.  JK: Thank you Susan, I appreciate your thoughts about living in Rudolph's Harkavy House.  SH: I'm happy to help.  It was a glorious house.

2016 Harkavy House
2016 Harkavy House Living Room
2016 Harkavy House Kitchen
2016 Harkavy House


10 Modern Wedding Venues That Will Make Your Big Day Unforgettable

Permalink - Posted on 2018-02-14 19:11

Honor your love for design—and each other—in one of these extraordinary wedding venues in the U.S. and beyond.

Bosjes, South Africa

Whether you want to hold the ceremony in an awe-inspiring chapel, a historic building with period details, or a pavilion set up in a breathtaking landscape, these wedding venues that stray from the beaten track are sure to make a big impression. Below, we round up 10 incredible wedding venues from around the world.

The Ruby Street

Location: Los Angeles, California

The Ruby Street

The Ruby Street, Los Angeles

The Ruby Street

The Ruby Street, originally built as a church in 1905 during the Arts and Crafts movement, has been completely restored as a modern wedding venue by husband-and-wife team Zach and Lourdes. Located in Highland Park, Los Angeles, a Saturday wedding with 150 guests will cost $8,500. 

Wanderland Popup

Location: New York, New Jersey, 

Wanderland Popup. Flowers are by Flower Child Florals.

Wanderland Popup, New Jersey. Flowers by Flower Child Florals.

Veronica Lola Photography

Wanderland is prop and event rental company headquartered in New Jersey with event venues in both Asbury Park and Highlands, New Jersey. The company also offers glamping tent rentals—available in New York, New Jersey, and Pennsylvania—that come outfitted with queen-size beds and vintage decor and furnishings. Packages at their Highlands, New Jersey, venue on the water at Sandy Hook Bay start at $115 per person, which includes an open bar and one of Wanderland’s tents. 

Bosjes

Location: Western Cape, South Africa

Bosjes, South Africa

Bosjes, South Africa

Adan Letch

Located in South Africa’s Western Cape, Bosjes is nestled in a valley between two mountain ranges. It signature chapel, with an undulating roof constructed from a slim concrete cast shell, was designed by Coetzee Steyn of London-based architecture firm Steyn Studio, with Psalm 36:7 serving as inspiration. Dining options include a high-ceilinged, glass-walled bistro-style restaurant, or a tea garden in an amphitheater. The 2018 rental rate is $4,620. 

Foreign Cinema

Location: San Francisco, California

Foreign Cinema, San Francisco

Foreign Cinema, San Francisco

Courtesy of Foreign Cinema

A fixture of San Francisco's restaurant scene—in fact, it was named a Top 100 Restaurant by the San Francisco Chronicle for 16 years in a row—Foreign Cinema melds together food, wine, art, and film. Private dining options can accommodate from 12 seated at the director's table to 350 standing in the entire space, and includes the Modernism West Gallery pictured above. The food and beverage minimum ranges between $5,000 and $35,000.

Butley Priory

Location: Suffolk, England

Butley Priory, UK

Butley Priory, UK

Fabian Blaschke

Originally a 14th-century monastery, Butley Priory in Suffolk, England offers a historic wedding venue with modern amenities. Only two hours from London, the priory offers accommodation for up to 11 people. Wedding packages for 45 guests on a weekend during high season (May-October) start at GBP 5,000 ($7,000).

Brooklyn Winery

Location: Brooklyn, New York

Brooklyn Winery

Brooklyn Winery, Williamsburg

Brooklyn Winery

Brooklyn Winery is an urban winery, situated in the ever-hip neighborhood of Williamsburg, that offers small-batch wine. The space features details such as wine barrels, reclaimed wood, and exposed brick. Full-service packages range from $250-$300 per person, plus management fees and taxes. 

Rimrock Ranch

Location: Pioneertown, California

Rimrock Ranch, Pioneertown, California

Rimrock Ranch, Pioneertown, California

Westlund Photography

Rimrock Ranch is an 11-acre ranch situated just outside Joshua Tree National Park near Pioneertown, California. Originally built as the weekend retreat for western actors such as Gene Autry and Roy Rogers, the ranch consists of four rustic cabins, retro-fitted Airstream trailers, a lodge, and the internationally famous architectural masterpiece known as the Hatch House. Rimrock Ranch wedding prices range between $10,000 and $15,000, which includes accommodation for 22 people.   

Thorncrown Chapel

Location: Eureka Springs, Arkansas

Thorncrown Chapel, Eureka Springs, Arkansas

Thorncrown Chapel, Eureka Springs, Arkansas

Thorncrown Chapel

Located in Eureka Springs, Arkansas, the iconic Thorncrown Chapel boasts 425 windows and over 6,000 square feet of glass. Designed and built by acclaimed architect E. Fay Jones in 1980, the magnificent structure is on the U.S. Historic register and has been named one of AIA's top 10 buildings of the 20th century. Described as a "forest within a forest," the space blends in with the surrounding scenery. Prices are $950 Sunday through Friday and $1,295 on Saturdays.

Shelter Co.

Location: Anywhere

Shelter Co., San Francisco, California

Shelter Co., San Francisco, California

Shelter Co.

If you already have your own venue but need to set the scene, Shelter Co. rents tents, furniture, and accessories for weddings and other events. Their Sami Tipi tent, pictured above, can be set up for dining for up to 60 guests, or arranged as a lounge. Shelter Co. serves the entire U.S. from their hubs in San Francisco and Austin. Minimum in-state rentals are $2,000, with a $20,000 minimum for rentals outside California and Texas. 

Barr Mansion

Location: Austin, Texas

The Barr Mansion and Ballroom, Austin, Texas

The Barr Mansion and Ballroom, Austin, Texas

Angela Lally Photography

The Barr Mansion, located in Austin, Texas, dates back over 100 years, but its 18th-century ballroom is even older—and was shipped piece by piece from New York. The giant windows impart a surprisingly modern feel, blending old and new. The first USDA-certified organic venue in the country, the Barr Mansion is a zero-waste facility. The starting prices for weddings at Barr Mansion are $10,000 to $25,000.


A Tranquil Lakeside Abode in Quebec Unfolds Over Six Levels

Permalink - Posted on 2018-02-14 01:55

Resting lightly on the terrain, this gorgeous vacation home stays connected to its surroundings through natural materials and emphatic views.

“The site was beautiful as it is,” architect Eric Tremblay said, and he wanted to build a home that had the least impact on the terrain as possible. The lake can be seen on either side of the house, and natural materials—like the Eramosa limestone coating on the exterior—were a priority during construction.

When architect Eric Tremblay of Boom Town was asked to construct this home in Harrington, Quebec, he was already familiar with the clients. He had recently completed a renovation of the couple’s Montreal apartment and now they were picturing a secluded vacation home that Tremblay would build from scratch. 

“The site was beautiful as it is,” architect Eric Tremblay said, and he wanted to build a home that had the least impact on the terrain as possible. The lake can be seen on either side of the house, and natural materials—like the Eramosa limestone coating on the exterior—were a priority during construction.

"The site was beautiful as it is," architect Eric Tremblay said, and he wanted to build a home that had the least impact on the terrain as possible. The lake can be seen on either side of the house, and natural materials—like the Eramosa limestone coating on the exterior—were a priority during construction.

Photo: Angus McRitchie

"We found this beautiful land bordering the lake with majestic cedars," he said, and the site became the basis for a minimally intrusive design. Tremblay used the slope of the ground to influence the home’s six connecting layers, which unfold to a ground level that opens directly to the lake. The property is intended for two, but since the owners are new grandparents, it is also a place meant to entertain family and friends.

While the homeowners and their guests have plenty of opportunities to view the outdoors, thanks in large part to windows and doors by Alumilex, an abundance of cedars offers privacy from the outside looking in. “We wanted to cut the least amount of trees,” Tremblay said.

While the homeowners and their guests have plenty of opportunities to view the outdoors, thanks in large part to windows and doors by Alumilex, an abundance of cedars offers privacy from the outside looking in. "We wanted to cut the least amount of trees," Tremblay said.

Photo: Angus McRitchie

Tremblay chose materials that would reflect the natural setting, like the Polylam-C cedar siding from Prorez, used at the home’s entrance. The exterior floor finish is Montauk grey slate.

Tremblay chose materials that would reflect the natural setting, like the Polylam-C cedar siding from Prorez, used at the home’s entrance. The exterior floor finish is Montauk grey slate.

Photo: Angus McRitchie

Low-impact materials were also used for the interior design, which is comprised primarily of concrete, glass, stone, wood, and steel. A palette of mostly light and neutral shades puts the attention on the views.

Low-impact materials were also used for the interior design, which is comprised primarily of concrete, glass, stone, wood, and steel. A palette of mostly light and neutral shades puts the attention on the views.

Photo: Angus McRitchie

Continuity of exterior and interior materials can be seen in the living room, which is framed by the same Prorez cedar siding as outside. It complements a wood fireplace by Stûv, which is finished with bamboo verde stone and Montauk grey slate.

Continuity of exterior and interior materials can be seen in the living room, which is framed by the same Prorez cedar siding as outside. It complements a wood fireplace by Stûv, which is finished with bamboo verde stone and Montauk grey slate.

Photo: Angus McRitchie

Raw wood planks were painted white and fitted next to a staircase and banister by Bättig Design. Matching chairs by Thayer Coggin sit atop a Crate and Barrel rug.

Raw wood planks were painted white and fitted next to a staircase and banister by Bättig Design. Matching chairs by Thayer Coggin sit atop a Crate and Barrel rug.

Photo: Angus McRitchie

“The roof terrace accessed from the master bedroom is the sunniest place, naturally,” said Tremblay. A custom-made bed by Boom Town, Tremblay’s firm, is outfitted with linens by Kravet. Outdoor seating is by Jardin de Ville.

"The roof terrace accessed from the master bedroom is the sunniest place, naturally," said Tremblay. A custom-made bed by Boom Town, Tremblay’s firm, is outfitted with linens by Kravet. Outdoor seating is by Jardin de Ville.

Photo: Angus McRitchie

An Emily quartz bathtub by Caml-Tomlin is surrounded by Ceragres’ fade and frammenti tile.

An Emily quartz bathtub by Caml-Tomlin is surrounded by Ceragres’ fade and frammenti tile.

Photo: Angus McRitchie

“Riftcut oak panels are used in woodworking and on some kitchen walls,” said Tremblay. The design of the cabinets is by Tremblay’s firm, Boom Town, with fabrication by Atelier Boisteck. Stools by Arteriors are lined in front of a granite countertop from Costa Esmeralda.

"Riftcut oak panels are used in woodworking and on some kitchen walls," said Tremblay. The design of the cabinets is by Tremblay’s firm, Boom Town, with fabrication by Atelier Boisteck. Stools by Arteriors are lined in front of a granite countertop from Costa Esmeralda.

Photo: Angus McRitchie


Let There Be Light: 4 Types of Kitchen Illumination

Permalink - Posted on 2018-02-14 01:23

By layering different types of lighting in your kitchen, you boost not only its functionality, but also its level of warmth and comfort.

The kitchen’s tubular lights were replaced with Heavy Medium pendants by Benjamin Hubert.  The space is outfitted with a suite of Monogram cooking appliances.

Irvington, New York
Dwell Magazine : November / December 2017

Kitchens are a design playground for those of us who love making decisions—between selecting appliances, countertop materials, flooring, and cabinetry, there's already a lot to consider, but homeowners should make sure not to overlook kitchen lighting.

Choosing the right light fixtures can elevate your kitchen, turning it into an efficient workspace and social hub that you and your guests will want to spend more time in. Below, we run through four kinds of lighting to consider.

Ambient Lighting 

Ambient or general lighting is the main source of light in your kitchen, and it usually comes in the form of ceiling or wall-mounted fixtures, recessed lights, or track lights directed downwards. Such fixtures should spread light evenly across a large floor area. Ambient lights will help create a warm and inviting overall atmosphere in your kitchen. Also consider adding dimmers so you can control the intensity of light for different occasions, or as seasons change.  

The homeowners, avid cooks, worked with a design duo and a contractor found on the site. To make the kitchen seem larger than it is, the team decided to place the largest cabinets and appliances near the entryway, with less clutter toward the window.

The owners of this storage-savvy apartment in New York, who are avid cooks, worked with a design duo and a contractor found on the site. To make the kitchen seem larger than it is, the team decided to place the largest cabinets and appliances near the entryway, with less clutter toward the window.

Courtesy of Sweeten

Task Lighting 

This type of lighting is focused on a specific area, usually your worktop, to ensure that you can safely and comfortably prepare meals. It is also sometimes installed inside a pantry, so you can see what you have on hand for dinner. Strip lights mounted underneath wall cabinets or cooker hoods, downlights in pantries or above an island counter, and large pendants above your worktop are good examples of task lighting. When choosing task lights, make sure they don't cast shadows over your work areas. Concealed LED strip lights are ideal, as they evenly illuminate most food preparation surfaces. 

Bunker Workshop used bright, red steel pegboard for the backsplash in this kitchen in Boston loft apartment in a former textile factory.

Bunker Workshop used bright, red steel pegboard for the backsplash in this kitchen in Boston loft apartment in a former textile factory.

Courtesy of Matt Delphenich

Accent Lighting 

Used mainly to highlight particular sections or details in your kitchen, accent lights focus and draw attention to artwork, collectibles, or interesting architectural features within the kitchen. Uplight sconces, wall-mounted fixtures, and track lights are some types of accent lights  that can be used to add depth and dimension to kitchen nooks, or enhance the appearance of interesting backsplashes or cabinetry. 

Courtesy of Dale Christopher Lang PhD AIAP

Decorative Lighting 

This type of lighting is the icing on the cake, and will help define the style or mood of your kitchen concept. A decorative light in the form of a chandelier or pendant is often the statement piece that hangs above island counters in most open-concept kitchens. When selecting a decorative suspension lamp, make sure it’s appropriate for the scale of your kitchen and height of your ceilings. It's important that your decorative lamp does not dominate the space. Make sure the design and color of your lamp matches the overall concept of your kitchen, and that the bottom of the lamp is around 25 to 28 inches above your island top.   

The Mandayam–Vohra family gathers under one of Workstead’s signature three-arm chandeliers, shown here in its horizontal configuration. Photo by: Matthew Williams

The Mandayam–Vohra family gathers under one of Workstead’s signature three-arm chandeliers, shown here in its horizontal configuration.

Photo: Matthew Williams


Modern House in Creve Couer

Permalink - Posted on 2018-02-14 00:53

The homeowners of this Mid Century Modern home in Creve Coeur are a young architect, his talented wife and their two young sons. Being avid collectors of Mid Century Modern furniture and furnishings, they purchased their Atomic Ranch home, built in the 1970s, and saw in it a perfect future vessel for their lifestyle. Nothing had been done to the home in 40 years but they saw it as a fresh palette. The walls separating the kitchen from the dining, living, and entry areas were removed. Support beams and columns were created to hold the loads. The kitchen and laundry facilities were gutted and the living areas refurbished. They saw open space with great light, just waiting to be used. As they waited for the perfect time, they continued collecting. The Architect purchased their Claritone, of which less than 50 are in circulation: two are in the Playboy Mansion, and Frank Sinatra had four. They found their Bertoia wire chairs, and Eames and Baby Eames rockers. The chandelier over the dining room was found in a Los Angeles prop studio. The dining table and benches were made from the reclaimed wood of a beam that was removed, custom designed and made by Mwanzi and Co. The flooring is white oak with a white stain. Chairs are by Kartell. The lighting pendants over the island are by Tom Dixon and were found at Centro in St. Louis. Appliances were collected as they found them on sale and were stored in the garage along with the collections until the time was right. Even the dog was curated...from a South Central Los Angeles Animal Shelter.


A 20th-Century Dutch Schoolhouse Now Holds a Series of Airy Lofts

Permalink - Posted on 2018-02-14 00:28

Built in 1912, an old school in Rotterdam, South Holland, is reincarnated as six light-filled apartments.

This box structure creates a second, lower ceiling above the living lounge.

Acclaimed Rotterdam practice Eklund Terbeek Architecten was enlisted to turn a 20th-century schoolhouse into six apartments. The studio’s founders, Jenny Eklund and Dominique ter Beek, were also responsible for the interior design of one loft, massaging the academic setting into a domestic one. 

A school in Rotterdam that was built in 1912 was converted into six apartments.

A school in Rotterdam that was built in 1912 was converted into six apartments.

Courtesy of René de Wit

The loft was previously comprised of two classrooms with mushroom-shaped windows, and a wide hallway that ran parallel to the rooms. 

An old school in Rotterdam than was converted into residential apartments.

An old school in Rotterdam than was converted into residential apartments.

Courtesy of René de Wit

The architects demolished the wall separating the two classrooms to create an open, spacious apartment.   

16.4-feet-high ceilings allowed for the creation of new intermediate floors and intimate mezzanines.

Over 16-foot-high ceilings allowed for the creation of new intermediate floors and intimate mezzanines.

Courtesy of René de Wit

The building’s 16.4-feet-high ceilings presented the duo with the chance to insert new intermediate floors and intimate mezzanines. They retained the unique, mushroom-shaped windows, but added a few apertures to create new sight lines, allow for more light penetration, and give the interiors a more expansive feel. 

Behind the wooden bookshelf in the living lounge, is a hidden staircase that leads up to the workspace.

Behind the wooden bookshelf in the living lounge is a hidden staircase that leads up to the workspace.

Courtesy of René de Wit

In the living area, a workspace is located in a white box that’s suspended from the ceiling. This box structure creates a second, lower ceiling above the living lounge underneath it, giving this zone a more intimate scale. 

From this workspace, the apartment’s owners can look out to the garden.

From this workspace, the apartment’s owners can look out to the garden.

Courtesy of René de Wit

Behind the wooden bookshelf in the living lounge is a hidden staircase that leads up to the home office. From this space, the apartment’s owners can look out to the garden, and from a small opening in the white box, they can also look down at the kitchen and dining areas on the ground level, located at the opposite end of the living lounge. 

The kitchen and dining area.

The kitchen and dining area

Courtesy of René de Wit

The kitchen has a large, concrete island with an oversized extractor hood above it. This white, box-like hood hangs from one of the load-bearing beams, mirroring the cubic form of the workspace box on the other side. 

The guest bedroom.

The guest bedroom.

Courtesy of Jansje Klazinga/Emmy van Dantzig

In the adjacent hallway, the architects created a mezzanine level to accommodate two bedrooms with low ceilings and alcove beds. One of the bedrooms has an interior window that looks towards the hallway, and the other has an interior window that looks to the main living area. 

A wooden box, which houses a walk-in-closet and stairs to the bedrooms, acts as a partition that dissects the hallway.

A wooden box, which houses a walk-in closet and stairs to the bedrooms, acts as a partition that dissects the hallway.

Courtesy of René de Wit

On the ground floor, a wooden box, which houses a walk-in closet and stairs to the bedrooms, acts as a partition that dissects the hallway, creating a sense of seclusion for the section of the hall where the bathrooms are located. 

The five original lavatories were updated and integrated into the new bathing area.

The five original lavatories were updated and integrated into the new bathing area.

Courtesy of Jansje Klazinga/Emmy van Dantzig

The bath area was designed as a circulation space that’s directly linked to the dining area, but that can be closed off for privacy. The five original lavatories were updated and integrated into the new bathing area. 

A mirror placed across the rear wall of the bathroom allows users to experience the original length of the school hallway.

A mirror placed across the rear wall of the bathroom allows users to experience the original length of the school hallway.

Courtesy of René de Wit

A mirror placed across the rear wall of the bathroom allows users to experience the original length of the school hallway, with its five toilet doors multiplied to 10 in the mirror’s reflection. What was the old director’s room next to the entrance was converted into guest quarters, and above it, a third mezzanine floor was added.

A child's bedroom.

A child's bedroom

Courtesy of Jansje Klazinga/Emmy van Dantzig

During the renovation, the architects saved as much as possible of the school’s original architectural details, such as the yellow glazed brickwork in the hallway. They applied a white render to the walls and load-bearing beams, but left the rough concrete ceiling exposed for a contrasting texture. The dark walnut wood of the bookshelves, dining table, and kitchen closets bring a warm and cozy feel to the otherwise pared-down home.

Loft plans

Loft plans

Courtesy of Eklund Terbeek

"The interior of the apartment merges old and new, contemporary and traditional, refined and rough, into a balanced whole," says ter Beek.

Loft sections

Loft sections

Courtesy of Eklund Terbeek


Project Credits:

Architecture and interior design: Eklund Terbeek

Builder: Massbouw and BDS 

Structural engineering: IMD Rotterdam  


1532 House

Permalink - Posted on 2018-02-14 00:26

This new San Francisco residence and studio, infilled on a twenty-five-foot-wide lot, reverses the reading of the city's Victorian houses with a completely porous front façade. Its broad bay window intentionally invites passersby to look into the street-facing painter's studio and beyond the sight line continuing through the studio and the three-story home in the rear to the backyard. Open slats replace siding, breaking the street wall while subtly echoing its rhythm. The design incorporates two sectional moves. A horizontal one introduces a courtyard between the front and rear structures; a vertical one brings the ground floor, which includes the garage and bedrooms, down to street level. These two design elements create a powerful interplay between inside and out and between different levels of the house and studio. Light and transparency shape dramatic interior and exterior spaces. This is a rare typology for San Francisco homes, whose lots are usually too shallow to accommodate an open courtyard. It promises a solution to a major problem in most city residences. Often deep and lit only from the front and back, they are invariably dark in the middle. On the contrary, the 1532 House has seven outdoor spaces, all with distinct qualities and views. Decks, walkways, and gardens unfurl around the living areas, heightening the visual complexity of the structure and its site. The second floor of the house-an open floor plan with kitchen, dining, and living areas-is punctuated by a two-story staircase and is on grade with the backyard. The third-floor suite consists of a master bedroom, bath, and study. The bedroom's bay window opens up a spectacular view of the backyard and the city park beyond, repeating the form of the glass bay at the front of the studio, which captures a view of the Golden Gate Bridge. The 1532 House is inseparable from its context. From every vantage point within, residents are visually connected to the incredibly varied urban landscape without.

Front facade
Backyard
Garden
Central courtyard


Oxford Residence

Permalink - Posted on 2018-02-13 23:52

This new residence creates a spacious living environment on a small but prominent corner lot, and a timeless architectural addition to the architecturally eclectic beach community of Venice, California. The open loft-like interior encompasses the common entry/dining/kitchen/lounge areas and connects to a private yard through large sliding glass doors. Each zone within the common areas of the home has been articulated by differing floor levels, finish materials, ceiling & lighting configuration, and window scale & orientation. Outdoor entertainment and lounge options are extended by a large rooftop deck affording views to the surrounding beach community. The focal double height volume encompasses the entry and dining areas and allows natural light deeper into the center of the house. The second level walkway, home office and the family/media room overlook this double height volume. Privacy on this prominent corner lot is maintained by surrounding solid fences, carefully placed landscaping and a raised concrete planter at the entry. The exterior is articulated with a base of cedar siding supporting an upper mass of smooth integrally colored plaster. The second floor windows lie primarily within a horizontal band which is further articulated by corrugated metal panels encircling the perimeter.

Front View
Front Corner View
Rear Yard - Covered Patio
Side View
Rear Yard View


Prahran Residence

Permalink - Posted on 2018-02-13 22:48

Behind an elegant Victorian facade in Prahran, this chic renovation creates a refined living space for a young family. Infused with classic Parisian style, the finely detailed kitchen became a hub for the family's day-to-day activities, with every element configured to maximise functionality. Banks of white joinery rise up to meet high ceilings while a central island bench with a Carrara marble top accommodates food preparation and informal dining. Minimalist furniture in shades of grey and emerald green continue the luxe aesthetic, while European oak flooring in a chevron pattern adds detail and texture to the space.

Kitchen details
Bedroom
Living area
Materials and finishes
Victorian frontage


Chalfont Beach

Permalink - Posted on 2018-02-13 22:46

The property is directly adjacent to Rye Nature Reserve, one of the most important conservation sites in Britain. The site is formed of undulating shingle deposits formed as the sea receded over centuries. The existing property was a small 2 room bungalow with a collection of sheds in various states of disrepair connected to the bungalow. It was not possible to refurbish the existing building and hence our brief was to create a modern building that responded to the unique context of the nature reserve. The site looks out across the reserve to the Mary Stanford Lifeboat building. This is a grade 2 listed building constructed in 1882 in pre-cast shingle based concrete, a pioneering construction method in its time. The lifeboat station plays a large part in the cultural heritage of the nature reserve hence a key design move was to echo the vernacular shape of the Lifeboat building while using modern methods of construction. Traditional architectural elements such as gutters and eaves have been removed or concealed to allow crisp clean detailing that emphasizes the primary form. Other local heritage structures that influenced the design are the concrete pill boxes found around the reserve. Slot like windows carefully positioned around the new building frame wide angle views of the landscape like those found in the pill boxes. The building is entirely clad in vertical larch boarding which adds a softer more intimate texture to counter the bold form of the building. The larch will gradually shed the applied grey stain to silver naturally over time. The Larch cladding continues to wrap the inside of the building with elements of coloured stone terrazzo laid on the floor to reflect the colour of the natural shingle ridges. The main superstructure is formed of a highly-insulated Timber frame with larch cladding fixed externally and internally. An air source Heat pump combined with Solar Thermal panels provides all hot water and heating needs. Wastewater is treated in a new onsite Bio Disk Treatment plant. All windows and Doors are either triple and double glazed units in a timber and aluminium composite frame. This is a sustainable family house, respectful to the historical and environmental heritage of the location, crafted in a vernacular form which seeks to re-establish a physical connection to the surrounding shingle landscape. RX Architects website: http://www.rxarchitects.com/ RX Architects Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/rxarchitects/ RX Architects Twitter: https://twitter.com/rxarchitects?lang=en RX Architects Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/rxarchitects/