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NEW PRODUCTS – Pimoroni Inky wHATs (ePaper/eInk/EPD) – Red/Black/White + Black/White

Permalink - Posted on 2019-03-18 16:50, modified at 16:52

NEW PRODUCTS – Pimoroni Inky wHATs (ePaper/eInk/EPD) – Red/Black/White + Black/White


We’ve got these in two flavors! First up, the Red/Black/White!

4143 iso 01 ORIG 2019 03

In the beginning there was Inky pHAT, a triumvirate of eInk bonnets from Pimoroni. And now, Pimoroni has upped their electronic paper displays to 4.2″ glorious inches! Say hellooo to Inky wHAT! You get 5x the number of pixels (400×300!) to use as an e-reader or maybe a weather display / calendar.

Everything comes fully-assembled, so there’s no soldering required! The display is securely plonked down to the Inky wHAT and connected via a ribbon cable. Just pop Inky wHAT on your Pi and run their installer to get everything set up!

The engineers at Pimoroni broke out some handy pins on the back of Inky wHAT, including I2C and SPI, letting you connect additional devices like breakouts and allowing you to show their data right on the display. Refreshing the display takes about 25 seconds.

Inky wHAT is compatible any 40-pin version of the Pi, including Pi Zero and Pi Zero W.

4143 kit ORIG 2019 03

Features:

  • 4.2″ EPD display (400×300 pixels)
  • 40-pin female header to boost height for Pi B+, 2, 3, 3B+
  • Standoffs to securely attach to your Pi
  • Additional pins, including I2C and SPI, broken out
  • Inky wHAT pinout
  • Compatible with Raspberry Pi 3 B+32B+A+Zero, and Zero W
  • Python library
  • Comes fully assembled

Note: The Inky wHAT display is made from glass so it’s pretty fragile. Be careful not to hulk smash or press too hard on it, or it will crack. When fitting the wHAT, grip at the edges of the board rather than pressing on top.

4143 quarter ORIG 2019 03

Now for the monochrome, Black/White!


4142

In the beginning there was Inky pHAT, a triumvirate of eInk bonnets from Pimoroni. And now, Pimoroni has upped their electronic paper displays to 4.2″ glorious inches! Say hellooo to Inky wHAT! You get 5x the number of pixels (400×300!) to use as an e-reader or maybe a weather display / calendar.

4142 iso 01 ORIG 2019 03

Everything comes fully-assembled, so there’s no soldering required! The display is securely plonked down to the Inky wHAT and connected via a ribbon cable. Just pop Inky wHAT on your Pi and run their installer to get everything set up!

The engineers at Pimoroni broke out some handy pins on the back of Inky wHAT, including I2C and SPI, letting you connect additional devices like breakouts and allowing you to show their data right on the display. Refreshing the display takes about 25 seconds.

Inky wHAT is compatible any 40-pin version of the Pi, including Pi Zero and Pi Zero W.

4142 kit ORIG 2019 03

Features:

  • 4.2″ EPD display (400×300 pixels)
  • 40-pin female header to boost height for Pi B+, 2, 3, 3B+
  • Standoffs to securely attach to your Pi
  • Additional pins, including I2C and SPI, broken out
  • Inky wHAT pinout
  • Compatible with Raspberry Pi 3 B+32B+A+Zero, and Zero W
  • Python library
  • Comes fully assembled

Note: The Inky wHAT display is made from glass so it’s pretty fragile. Be careful not to hulk smash or press too hard on it, or it will crack. When fitting the wHAT, grip at the edges of the board rather than pressing on top.

4142 quarter ORIG 2019 03

In stock and shipping now!


‘Apollo 11’ Documentary Soundtrack Features Electronic Sounds Of 1969 #MusicMonday

Permalink - Posted on 2019-03-18 16:00, modified at 01:47

via Synthopia

The highly-acclaimed film (currently rated 100% on Rotten Tomatoes) features a score by composer Matt Morton, who chose to score it using an expanded palette of orchestra + electronics – but only using instruments that would have been available in 1969.

Morton says that every instrument and effect used in the score existed at the time of the mission in 1969 including the Moog modular Synthesizer IIIc, the Binson Echorec 2 tube echo, the Mellotron sample playback keyboard and the instruments of the orchestra.

See and hear more!


Pick ‘n Place in Slow Motion #ManufacturingMonday @adafruit (video)

Permalink - Posted on 2019-03-18 15:54

Happy Manufacturing Monday from Adafruit!

Video of our pick ‘n place machine picking and placing in slow motion. This Samsung SM-482 “Pick-and Place” machine (aka PnP) PICKs individual surface mount components from feeders and then PLACEs those components onto pre-programmed sites on the awaiting PCB. This particular PnP has six nozzles that it uses to pick and place parts, which it can do with incredible speed and accuracy.


Synthenada, an Empanada Synthesizer #MusicMonday

Permalink - Posted on 2019-03-18 15:00, modified at 14:56

Alex Glow totally wins Pi Day with this flaky crusted tune maker:

The story broke late last year: you can use Vegemite as conductive paint. That means you can replace solder, Bare Conductive paint, or any other conductive substrate with it! I grew up with Marmite, which is the British version, so I’m perfectly happy “ruining” a pie with this for Pi Day.

Read more on Hackster.io and see more on YouTube


An Electronic Billboard for N Scale Model Railroading #models #FromTheForums #Adafruit @Adafruit

Permalink - Posted on 2019-03-18 14:20, modified at 12:51

From the Adafruit Forums, user modeller has posted some great photos and information on their model railroading efforts.

Hey all – been gone for a few years but recently ordered a box o’ parts from Adafruit. What I’m making now is an electronic billboard for the side of the road like you can see nowadays along the highways. I’m using a Nano, an RGB OLED, a real time clock, and a TMP36 temp sensor – because one of the displays sequences will show the real time and temperature! It will be cycling through about ten “ads” for different things like public safety and product ads.

It so happens that the tiny OLED is about the right size for an N scale (1:160) billboard. So far I’m making good progress. After the electronics is nailed down, I’ll make it more permanent and I’ll have to make a scale billboard stand for the OLED and run the wires down from the top of the layout to the Nano under the table.

So, after some considerations I decided to simply add a button switch, an additional LED, and some code that will indicate that DST has been activated. The RTC time is set up to “normal” time (non-DST). All the button does is sense a press, sets a boolean variable, and adds an hour to the displayed time until you want to end DST. The DST true or false variable is stored in eeProm so when powered on it will read the value back and continue to add the hour. When DST is ended in your area you simply go under the table again and press the button until the LED goes off, and the time goes back to “normal” time until the next time DST comes around. Simple and it works.

By the way, here’s my tribute to Adafruit which will be one of the ads cycling on the electronic billboard. I would make an Adafruit show room too but if you actually go 10 scale miles you’d fall off the edge of the world LOL.

IMG_0995.JPG

See more in the forum post.

Do you use electronics in your hobbies? Let us know in the comments below.


MusicMakers022: Ben Parker (Nosferatu D2 / Tempertwig / Superman Revenge Squad)

Permalink - Posted on 2019-03-18 14:09, modified at 15:41

MusicMakers is an interview series from Adafruit that explores the intersection of the DIY music and maker communities. We’ll be talking to some of our favorite musicians about art, tech, DIY, gear tips and more. Along the way we hope you’ll find some great new music as well as some ideas and inspiration for your own projects. This week we speak to Ben Parker of Nosferatu D2 and Superman Revenge Squad fame in the lead up to the release of Tempertwig‘s FAKE NOSTALGIA: An Anthology of Broken Stuff collection.

Ben Parker performing with his brother Adam as Nosferatu D2 – image courtesy of the artist

Alongside his brother Adam, Ben Parker has a modest standing as the kind of micro cult figure that could only really have ever existed under the circumstances of the strange and sprawling musical framework that became so accessible in the 2000s.

The most popular project of Croydon’s Parker brothers was Nosferatu D2’s lone full-length album, We’re Gonna Walk Around This City with our Headphones on to Block out the Noise, recorded in 2007 and released in 2009, the brothers had already long abandoned their work under this name by the time it found its audience. The album had been shelved after the band’s split and it was only through the broadening channels of DIY distribution that it began to reach new people, released through a bedroom record label and largely promoted through small blogs, zines and digital radio. Acclaimed for the depth and creativity of their lyrics and the frantic unpredictability of their sound, the duo came to be praised by some of the key independent music sites of their time and found themselves and the story of their album’s unconventional release to be the subject of radio stories from both the BBC and Public Radio International. But at the peak of this interest, they would never agree to reform.

Ben Parker would then whittle Nosferatu D2’s sound down to its most basic elements, performing acoustically under the Superman Revenge Squad name. His lo-fi recordings and scrappy self-released albums would continue to earn him admiration from the DIY music press and a couple of support slots with MusicMakers alumni Jeffrey Lewis.

The Parker brothers reunited in 2013 for The Superman Revenge Squad Band’s There Is Nothing More Frightening Than the Passing of Time album, a layered and ambitious redux of the Superman Revenge Squad project, reimagining the minimalist sound with saxophone, cello, piano, accordion and Adam’s frantic percussion. Shortly thereafter Parker stepped away from his position as both solo artist and bandleader, positioning himself closer to the sidelines as the guitarist and co-vocalist of the Jonbarr Hinge quartet.

This year, nearly ten years since the belated release of Nosferatu D2’s only album, the fledgling Randy Sadage label (another first timer DIY label) will be releasing FAKE NOSTALGIA: An Anthology of Broken Stuff from the Tempertwig trio, a pre-Nosferatu D2 project from the Parker brothers. As a little known trio who operated principally between 1999 and 2004, this gorgeous collection of their fractured noise and cracked melancholy is another example of the kind of archiving and opportunity for posterity and discovery that would have been relatively new and unique at the time the Parkers were originally forming and disbanding these groups.

From the long and atypical trajectory of Parker’s music and release schedule, I think you can take some inspiration from the idea that sometimes all you need is time. There’s an audience out there for unique and creative art, even if it’s not in your hometown or discovered within the traditional release cycle. Music has the potential to be heard further, wider and longer than ever before.

Through Parker’s evolution from being the leading voice of trio then a duo before settling into a prolonged solo run which he later adapted into a wild and raucous big band sound, before immersing himself in the Jonbarr Hinge’s collective power pop, I think you can take the message that if you have the ideas and the energy, you can express your creativity any way that you want. You can make music any way that you want.

We’re glad to have spoken to Ben Parker for the MusicMakers Q&A series, I hope you can take some inspiration from his work and his answers. In a world of unlimited options, varieties, plug-ins, life hacks and customizations, his “I just get on with it” approach is something worth remembering.

The Parker brothers with bassist Daniel Debono performing as Tempertwig – image courtesy of Rattail.net

Your career has had a unique path, going from a three-piece to duo to solo to lo-fi big band. What freedoms and opportunities have you enjoyed as a result of these lineup changes?
I think I’m a bit of a control freak but I also like to not be alone. Playing music with Adam is really natural as we’ve played together since we were first playing instruments. But we obviously have very different tastes, with the common ones only really being Dinosaur Jr and the Afghan Whigs and the Cure, and a lot of bands that one of us loves and the other one really doesn’t, which I think made us make a kind of unique sound but also meant that we had to trim away things from the sound that we’d probably like to do. When I started writing Superman Revenge Squad songs I could suddenly do anything I wanted, which was nice, but I missed the magic of collaboration at the same time.

The recordings on FAKE NOSTALGIA are pulled from a variety of sessions, how did these sessions vary and how different were they to records you would later work on?
The recordings span the duration of the band, so include some time booked at professional studios along with recordings done with friends and recordings done by ourselves, so they are a mixture of different experiences. Basically, towards the end of Tempertwig we were coming to the conclusion that we were most happy when there was no-one involved in the recording process other than ourselves.

With the variety of styles, lineups and recording setups you’ve used, have your priorities or goals for releasing and recording music changed at all?
When we started, the goal was to get a gig, then it was to get more gigs, then it was to try to get on the radio somehow… then I realised that these goals were all dependent on other people, so I made the goals things dependent on my own creativity alone, which ultimately led to Superman Revenge Squad, where I recorded just to “release” CDs on my own and sell them over the internet, and that was the only real goal.

How have your influences evolved over the years?
I have listened to less and less indie rock as the years have gone by, and tended to listen to things that are nothing like music I could ever create myself. Dating back to before tempertwig, I was starting to really get into Duke Ellington, which lead to Gil Evans, big jazz soundscapes. Nothing like anything I could ever do.

In more recent years, you’ve moved into the writing of short stories and plays. Was this a challenging transition for you?
Lots of the Tempertwig songs started as short stories that I never finished. The hard thing about writing fiction is the fear that you’d put so much time in and no-one would ever read it. At least with a song you know that there will be at least a few listeners, even if they are uninterested. I was able to write a few plays as I developed them along with the theatre group in Croydon, so I knew there was a chance of seeing them performed.

Do you have advice for customizing a creative workspace?
Not really to be honest. I just get on with it when the mood takes.


The rise of digitization in the music industry gave way to the online record labels and blogs allowed outlets like the BBC and Public Radio International to discover your work. How have you seen the industry evolve?
I’ve never been a part of the music industry, so couldn’t really say. I know that when we started it fest like you could potentially get “signed” and make a living out of playing indie rock. Nowadays I suspect that isn’t the case.

Is it an odd feeling to be praised for these “lost albums”? Receiving acclaim for something you’re no longer actively participating in?
Yes, it feels like so much time has gone by that the person singing and playing on the recordings isn’t me anymore. It’s nice though.

What is the musical chemistry like with your brother? And what feels different about playing songs like “Springsteen” or “Comfort Blanket” with Adam versus songs like “The Angriest Dog in the World”?
Adam is a great drummer, and a really creative person. “Springsteen” was created by two people (me and Adam) and “Comfort Blanket” by three people (me, Adam and Daniel) – they wouldn’t have been the same songs at all if the other people hadn’t been involved. Whilst I used to get some chords and lyrics together, I’d take them to the others and we would work them into the songs, often by removing my initial musical ideas. “The Angriest Dog in the World,” on the other hand, was a song written by me that Adam elevated by adding his own unique drum sound.

The last album you released was 2015’s Broken Ribs, Broken Records with The Jonbarr Hinge and you’ve not played live since 2016. Are you working on anything musical now?
I became a father in 2016 and put things on hold for a bit. However, I have occasionally had a go on the guitar and scribbled down some song ideas. I have half an album of stuff so far, not sure what to do with it yet.

What’s one song (by somebody else) that everyone should hear?
The Weaker Soldier” by Palace Music off ‘Arise, Therefore’, in fact that whole album is a thing of wonder.

Tempertwig’s FAKE NOSTALGIA: An Anthology of Broken Stuff collection is available now for pre-order on Randy Sadage Records.

For more Ben Parker music you can visit: Nosferatu D2 Bandcamp / The Superman Revenge Squad Bandcamp / Superman Revenge Squad Bandcamp / Tempertwig Bandcamp /“Complete Ben Parker” Spotify Playlist + you can follow him on Twitter.

Check out more MusicMakers Q&A’s (feat. Art Brut, Jeffrey Lewis, Frankie Cosmos, Pom Pom Squad, Benjamin Shaw, Bedbug and more), TasteMakers (feat. Alcopop! Records, The Grey Estates and more), TrackTalk (feat. Trust Fund, Haiku Salut, Deerful and more) and the Adafruit Artist Spotlight for DIY tips and music discovery.  Plus, you can follow Adafruit on Soundcloud and Hype Machine.


Exploring The Science Behind Luther’s Body in The Umbrella Academy

Permalink - Posted on 2019-03-18 14:00, modified on 2019-03-14 21:20

An interesting look at what makes Luther from The Umbrella Academy so unique via SyFyWire

Of the seven children, we’re going to focus on one. Namely, we’re going to focus on No. 1, aka Spaceboy, aka Luther, Hargreeves’ personal favorite and the one whose abilities most closely match anything we’d be able to replicate in real life. His ability, enhanced strength, is mundane when juxtaposed against his siblings’ abilities, but his leadership ability and loyalty make him an asset Hargreeves is eager to exploit. And his additional assets definitely make for some interesting questions.

Read more!


Symbolics.com, the first commercial address registered on the Internet #Internet #History #makerbusinessmonday #makerbusiness

Permalink - Posted on 2019-03-18 13:50, modified at 02:19

Internet domain names turned 34 March 15th. This convention that puts a human-friendly face to the Internet has played a tremendous role in how all of us who do business on the Internet present ourselves and find each other. Check out this article about this anniversary over at Mashable:

The entire Internet forgot it was grandpa’s birthday. Symbolics.com — the first domain name ever registered — had a recent birthday, and just about no one had anything nice to say.

The site was first registered on March 15, 1985—the same year Bill Watterson published his first Calvin and Hobbes strip, Mike Tyson debuted as a pro boxer, and Mark Zuckerberg was born to pair of lonely Cray-2 supercomputers. In Internet years, Symbolics is ancient, a veritable methuselah.

Symbolics (the company) built computer systems in Cambridge, Mass., making workstations that ran on a software language called Lisp. In fact, Symbolics was making computer workstations before the term “workstation” even existed.

The personal computing boom pretty much left Symbolics in the dust, though the company is still chugging along, making highly specialized programming environments. It’s now operating under a new domain, however—symbolics-dk.com. How unhistorical.

A so-called “a virtual real estate investment firm,” XF.com Investments, snapped up the domain in 2009 for an undisclosed sum. The company’s head, Aron Meystadt, has sinced turned Symbolics.com into an Internet museum, of sorts, that includes a brief history of the domain—but also his personal blog.

He wrote in a post 6 years ago celebrating its birthday: “I know you’re here because you read, somewhere, that today is the anniversary of the first registered domain name. I am using this unique URL for my personal blog about domain names, e-Business and startup ideas. If you choose to stick around, that would be fine with me.”

It’s like some dude parked his recliner right on the steps of Plymouth Rock and asked people to listen to his business ideas while they took in a little bit of sightseeing. We need an Internet historical association, or something. Just look at what’s happened to Friendster.

Anyway, look. If you own one of the 250,000,000 websites in the world, take a moment to wish Symbolics a happy birthday today. Be kind to your elders.

Read more.

Thanks to @HistoryTime_ on Twitter for the reminder and Matt who wrote this up 6 years ago for Adafruit.


Robot Archaeology: the Big Trak #Robots #ReverseEngineering

Permalink - Posted on 2019-03-18 13:40, modified at 02:03

Another robot from back in the day:

BIG TRAK is a programmable electric vehicle created by Milton Bradley in 1979, resembling a futuristic Sci-Fi tank / utility vehicle, possibly for use on the Moon or a Planetoid style environment. The original Big Trak was a six-wheeled (two-wheel drive) tank with a front-mounted blue “photon beam” headlamp, and a keypad on top. The toy could remember up to 16 commands, which it then executed in sequence.

In 2010, BIG TRAK was relaunched in the form of a slightly modified replica (cosmetically very similar to the original U.K. bigtrak), produced under licence by Zeon Ltd. There is also a small dedicated Internet community who have reverse engineered the BIG TRAK and the Texas Instruments TMS1000 microcontroller inside it. (Wikipedia)

Robotroom.com has information on how the community has opened these vehicles up to reverse engineer and tinker with these programmable marvels.

Main PCB (motherboard) with part number and wiring information from the Big Trak.

The Big Trak’s brain is a 4-bit TMS1000 microcontroller running at approximately 0.2 MHz (at 6 clock cycles per instruction that’s 0.033 MIPS). Members of that chip family were used a lot in calculators and consumer appliances. It cost less than $3 at the time, in quantity.

If you are interested in checking this ‘bots capabilities, see this article on the possibilities.

Schematic / wiring diagram for the Big Trak.

Are you a vintage robot fan? Let us know in the comments below.


Python on Microcontrollers Newsletter: learn more here! #python #circuitpython #microcontrollers @CircuitPython @micropython @ThePSF @Adafruit

Permalink - Posted on 2019-03-18 13:30, modified at 02:43

Python in Space, PyPortal

The weekly Python on Microcontrollers newsletter – your source for breaking Python information


Catch all the weekly news on Python for Microcontrollers
 with adafruitdaily.com. This ad-free, spam-free weekly email is filled with the Python information that you may have missed, all in one place! This includes Python news worldwide – you get a summary of all the gear, events, projects, and the latest software! 5,100+ readers and still our fastest growing newsletter!

Ensure you catch the weekly news roundup – you can cancel anytime – try our spam-free newsletter today!

Come for the Python news, stay for the Python community.

CircuitPython is a worldwide community who love to code hardware in the fastest growing language in the world. We have helpful, active community on the Adafruit Discord channel and in the CircuitPython GitHub repo. If you’d like to join a vibrant group of coders looking to apply their skills in a helpful and appreciative environment, you’ve found it here.


NEW GUIDE: PyPortal Email Display with Zapier and Adafruit IO @zapier @adafruitio #PyPortal #IoT

Permalink - Posted on 2019-03-18 13:25

NEW GUIDE alert: PyPortal Email Display with Zapier and Adafruit IO.

Want to write a message to your PyPortal’s display? Perhaps you’d like to easily add and change text on your PyPortal’s display to use it as a smart sticky-note, or have people email it directly!

Using Zapier, you will set up a Zap to receive email via a custom Zapier email address at zapiermail.com and forward it to an Adafruit IO Feed. With some CircuitPython Code, your PyPortal will be obtaining the current value of an Adafruit IO Feed and updating the display with the email sender address and the subject line.

Read the guide here…


Heat your House with a Water Brake Windmill #Green #GreenEnergy

Permalink - Posted on 2019-03-18 13:15, modified at 01:35

Via Low-Tech Magazine: Given the right conditions, a mechanical windmill with an oversized brake system is a cheap, effective, and sustainable heating system.

A solar thermal collector converts solar to electricity and supplies renewable thermal energy in a direct and efficient way.

Much less known is that a mechanical windmill can do the same in a windy climate — by oversizing its brake system, a windmill can generate lots of direct heat through friction. A mechanical windmill can also be coupled to a mechanical heat pump, which can be cheaper than using a gas boiler or an electric heat pump driven by a wind turbine.

image

Read the article for the details.


Mournful Drone Sounds of a Repurposed HP Test Device #MusicMonday

Permalink - Posted on 2019-03-18 12:00, modified at 01:47

via CDM

Hainbach continues to make beautiful sounds with esoteric or forgotten gear – this time, the “saddest drone machine,” a used HP 3782A Error Detector telco device.

“The HP 3782A Error Detector used with a HP 3781A Pattern Generator forms a flexible, high-performance error measuring system for digital transmission equipment in the CEPT digital hierarchy. They provide 2, 8, and 34 Mb/s interfaces and binary ECL operation up to 50 Mb/s. Automated or remote measurement capability with HP-IB. Measurements can be made on all types of digital transmission systems including cable, digital radio, satellite, and lightwave. The pattern generator provides a wide range of test patterns including PRBS for simulating live traffic and shorter WORD patterns for checking pattern sensitivity in transmission equipment. Binary and code error injection capability is included for stress-testing line terminating equipment. A jitter modulation input is provided to add controlled amounts of jitter to the output test pattern and perform jitter tolerance tests on equipment interfaces.”

Hear more!


These Caves in Bermuda Inspired the ’80s TV Show “Fraggle Rock”

Permalink - Posted on 2019-03-18 11:00, modified on 2019-03-14 16:09

If you were a fan of Fraggle Rock or still catch reruns on television, this is definitely some fun information via Smithsonian

For residents of Bermuda, Crystal Caves is one of the island’s many crown jewels, but for Bermudian Michael K. Frith, co-creator of the beloved 1980s puppet TV show “Fraggle Rock,” the caves were an inspiration.

Since he was a child, Frith recalls spending time exploring the caves tunneling beneath the island’s eastern edge, about eight miles from Hamilton, the island’s capital. From marveling at the finger-like stalactites gripping the caves’ atrium-like ceiling and the massive stalagmites rising from the ground to seeing their reflections glisten back at him in the subterranean expanse’s crystal-clear pool, he soaked everything in. So, years later, when famed filmmaker and puppeteer Jim Henson tasked Frith—a former Random House editor and illustrator (fun fact: he edited many Dr. Suess books) who was then working at the Jim Henson Company—and his colleagues to create a new TV show targeted at children, Frith looked no further than the “magical world” resting right beneath his feet.

Read More!


The robots are coming. Will they work with us? | #MakeRobotFriend

Permalink - Posted on 2019-03-18 10:00, modified on 2019-03-13 13:08

Check out this recent segment from PBS NewsHour, which talks about the future of robots in the workplace. Thanks to blog reader N Blume for the tip!

n the latest installment of our Future of Work series, Miles O’Brien visits MIT’s Interactive Robotics Laboratory to understand the “new species” of robots scientists are designing to work alongside humans safely. Though the devices often excel at repetitive tasks, will they be able to function just as well in dynamic environments, such as the faced-paced world of health care?

Read more.


New From Music Holly Herndon And Her A.I. Spawn #MusicMonday

Permalink - Posted on 2019-03-18 09:00, modified at 15:13

via Synthopia

“For the album, she assembled a contemporary ensemble of vocalists, developers, guest contributors (Jenna Sutela, Jlin, Lily Anna Haynes, Martine Syms) and an inhuman intelligence housed in a DIY souped-up gaming PC to create a record that encompasses live vocal processing and timeless folk singing, and places an emphasis on alien song craft and new forms of communion.”

“PROTO makes reference to what Holly refers to as the protocol era, where rapidly surfacing ideological battles over the future of A.I. protocols, centralized and decentralized internet protocols, and personal and political protocols compel us to ask ourselves who are we, what are we, what do we stand for, and what are we heading towards?”

Hear more!


Scrappy Circuits #Education #MakerEducation

Permalink - Posted on 2019-03-18 08:00, modified on 2019-03-14 13:11

Scrappy Circuits Make

You can use things you probably have in your junk drawer right now to teach simple circuits. Michael Carroll on Make shares this learning project:

The best dollar you can spend on a child’s STEAM education is to take them to the dollar store, buy an electronic item, and then take it apart. Learning how a handheld fan, LED light, remote control, or headphones work will help show how wind turbines, traffic lights, speakers, keyboards, and other modern devices function.

The next step is to take apart a dollar store item and make it better — combine two items, replace a switch, create something new and unique. Scrappy Circuits is the perfect way to get started.

Learn more!


Barcelona from Above #dronephotography #drone #droneday

Permalink - Posted on 2019-03-18 07:00, modified on 2019-03-15 11:31

NewImage

Beautiful photos from Márton Mogyorósy on Behance via De Zeen:

A series of aerial photographs from the capital of Catalonia, which captures the city’s abstract and architectural wonders from a bird’s eye view. As the former fishermen’s quarter which is characterized by its narrow and lively streets. As well as one of Barcelona’s lesser-known masterpiece, Ricardo Bofill’s utopian vision for social living that found form in the cubist heights and halls of Walden 7.

See more


Welcome to drone day on the Adafruit blog. Every Monday we deliver the latest news, products and more from the Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV), quadcopter and drone communities. Drones can be used for video & photography (dronies), civil applications, policing, farming, firefighting, military and non-military security work, such as surveillance of pipelines. Previous posts can be found via the #drone tag and our drone / UAV categories.


Manufacturing’s Giant Pool of Untapped Talent

Permalink - Posted on 2019-03-18 06:00, modified on 2019-03-13 13:06

Great piece by Jessie Wright-Mendoza featured on The Prepared.

The manufacturing industry in the U.S. has a problem. Nationally, manufacturing is facing a shortage of skilled labor that is predicted to worsen in the immediate future. The mass exodus of retiring baby-boomers, combined with a workforce lacking the necessary tools and training, and a public that perceives the industry as an undesirable career path are predicted to leave over 2 million manufacturing jobs unfulfilled by 2025.  

The good news is that the country has a huge pool of able-bodied, trainable workers eager for steady, well-paying jobs: women, a population that’s historically been ignored by manufacturing recruiters. Despite this, manufacturers have done little to change the way they market to and engage with these potential employees, nor have many companies made moves to change workplace culture in a way that would inspire women interested in going into the field. As it is, women account for only 29% of the manufacturing workforce, despite representing 47% of the workforce as a whole.

Read more.


A Brief History of the Keaton Music Typewriter #MusicMonday

Permalink - Posted on 2019-03-18 05:00, modified at 14:56


NewImage

From Music Printing History via bored panda:

There are several Keaton music typewriters thought to be in existence in museums and private collections. It was marketed in the 1950s and sold for around $225. The typewriter made it easier for publishers, educators, and other musicians to produce music copies in quantity. Composers, however, preferred to write the music out by hand.

Read more


Emily Warren Roebling #WHM19 #WomensHistoryMonth #WomenInSTEM

Permalink - Posted on 2019-03-18 04:30, modified at 13:59

Preview lightbox adafruit womens history 19 blog

EWR

Last year a streetcorner was named in Emily Warren Roebling’s honor, she oversaw the construction of the Brooklyn Bridge after her engineer husband fell ill. Via BKLYNR

A streetcorner will be named in honor of pioneering Brooklyn Heights resident for her role in completing one of the greatest pieces of Brooklyn iconography there is: the Brooklyn Bridge.

Emily Warren Roebling (1843-1903) will be honored by having the corner of Columbia Heights and Orange Street co-named after her this afternoon. Roebling lived nearby, at 110 Columbia Heights, with her husband Washington Roebling.

Washington Roebling served as the Chief Engineer for the construction of the Brooklyn Bridge, after his father, the bridge’s designer, John Roebling, passed away. Unfortunately, early in the construction, Washington Roebling developed caisson disease, or depressurization sickness, from the chambers used in the underwater construction of the bridge’s supports.
With her husband bedridden by the disease, Emily Warren Roebling stepped in to not only tend to his health, but to see the bridge through to completion. For fourteen years, Emily Warren Roebling oversaw the day-to-day construction of the bridge, learning about the engineering aspects of the project as she relayed information to her crippled husband.

At the completion of the project, Congressman Abram Hewitt, the future Mayor of New York, called the Brooklyn Bridge “…an everlasting monument to the sacrificing devotion of a woman and of her capacity for that higher education from which she has been too long disbarred.”

When the bridge opened in 1883, the woman who had helmed the project for nearly 14 years was the first to walk across its span. A plaque dedicated to Emily Warren Roebling, her husband Washington and his father John Roebling, stands on the crossing to this day:

Learn more!


Breaking Up Asteroids is Hard to Do

Permalink - Posted on 2019-03-18 04:00, modified on 2019-03-14 21:24


IMAGE: PIXABAY

via Johns Hopkins

A popular theme in the movies is that of an incoming asteroid that could extinguish life on the planet, and our heroes are launched into space to blow it up. But incoming asteroids may be harder to break than scientists previously thought, finds a Johns Hopkins study that used a new understanding of rock fracture and a new computer modeling method to simulate asteroid collisions.
The findings, to be published in the March 15 print issue of Icarus, can aid in the creation of asteroid impact and deflection strategies, increase understanding of solar system formation, and help design asteroid mining efforts.

Read more!


Custom D&D / dice game calculator using Adafruit FEATHER m0 express and Rust

Permalink - Posted on 2019-03-18 00:05, modified on 2019-03-17 23:54

0S9Turr

Acvnuky
Custom D&D / dice game calculator using Adafruit FEATHER m0 express and Rust, Caleb writes –

I printed, built, and programmed a calculator for D&D and other dice based games. It rolls simple dice like ‘d20’, ‘d100’, or ‘d42’ or sets of dice like ‘4d20 + d4 + 4’

This first version of the firmware is basic, but I plan to add a ‘stats’ function to print the odds of rolling the number you rolled, a ‘test’ function to ‘prove’ that it is a fair die, and a ‘gamblers falicy mode’. Gamblers falicy mode would increase the odds of rolling a dice face that hasn’t been rolled recently, making a series of dice outcome better fit an expected distribution. This mode might take some RNG out of games like catan or machi koro.

Read more, GitHub, via Hackaday.


TheOtherLoneStar – Adafruit Circuit Playground, MakeCode, CircuitPython, and MORE @otherlonestar

Permalink - Posted on 2019-03-17 23:56, modified at 23:46

Adafruit Circuit Playground, MakeCode, CircuitPython, and MORE (video) by TheOtherLoneStar.


CircuitPython in space … Pythonaut! @circuitpython @adafruit @maholli404 @zacinaction @SmallSat #KickSat

Permalink - Posted on 2019-03-17 23:03, modified at 23:04

Blinka In Space-1

We posted about the 50+ micro satellites loaded with CircuitPython for a hackathon that Max tweeted about on Twitter. It’s part of the KickSat Sprite, 2019, running Circuitpython – GitHub.

We contacted Max to find out a bit more about this project, here are some the details – it’s out of this world!

“I’m a materials science PhD student at Stanford working to make space more accessible. Did you know 65% of small satellite missions are unsuccessful? This directly hinders the amount of science being conducted– imagine if the first step to conducting a chemistry experiment required designing and building the fume hood or hotplate! That would be silly!

Small satellites have steep hardware and software learning curves. I’ll be speaking at SmallSat 2019 about Prof. Zac Manchester and I’s low cost, open source, radiation-tolerant hardware designs implemented on KickSat-2, currently in orbit. Now I’m addressing the software side of things with CircuitPython.

Python In Space

KickSat-2 deployment of “sprites.”

CircuitPython provides an approachable and logical means of conducting science with hardware. Paired with low-cost hardware shown to work in space, we can enable an new generation to question and explore the unknown. With the necessary “satellite stuff” already baked in, students can spend their time trying something new rather than reinventing the wheel (similar philosophy to early Arduino efforts and the microcontroller movement in general).

31919Snowf

Empowered from the helpful discord community, I started off with CP with makerspace workshops like the snowflake.

31919Sam32

Then my “SAM32” dev board, that’s potentially being integrated into the Stanford EE curriculum this fall. And now the workshop in New Zealand with the Breakthrough Initiatives folks.

31919Space01

31919Space02

This is all possible because of ADAFRUIT and the hard work/money you’ve invested in open source. THANK YOU. Please let me know if there’s anything I can do on my end to help the cause. I’d love to collaborate!”


Alex Dainis, PhD Made A Thing! LED HELIX @AlexDainis

Permalink - Posted on 2019-03-17 22:41, modified at 22:30

I Made A Thing! LED HELIX (video) –

I made a thing! It’s an embroidered DNA helix with little LED sequins as the base pairs! This is a slightly different video than normal but I had a lot of fun making this project and I hope you have fun watching as I try and make it work!

Made with…

LED Sequins: https://www.adafruit.com/product/3377
Conductive Thread: https://www.adafruit.com/product/641
Gemma M0: https://www.adafruit.com/product/3501
Battery Pack: https://www.adafruit.com/product/727

Watch!


New Products 3/13/19 Featuring #Adafruit #HUZZAH32 – #ESP32 Breakout Board!

Permalink - Posted on 2019-03-17 16:36, modified at 16:47

New Products 2 29 19 Featuring Adafruit PyPortal adafruit Adafruit Industries Makers hackers artists designers and engineers

Browse through all that’s new here!


NEW PRODUCTS THIS WEEK


4142 00
Pimoroni Inky wHAT (ePaper/eInk/EPD) – Black/White

In the beginning there was Inky pHAT, a triumvirate of eInk bonnets from Pimoroni. And now, Pimoroni has upped their electronic paper displays to 4.2″ glorious inches! Say hellooo to Inky wHAT! You get 5x the number of pixels (400×300!) to use as an e-reader or maybe a weather display / calendar.

See more!


4143 00
Pimoroni Inky wHAT (ePaper/eInk/EPD) – Red/Black/White : Everything comes fully-assembled, so there’s no soldering required! The display is securely plonked down to the Inky wHAT and connected via a ribbon cable. Just pop Inky wHAT on your Pi and run their installer to get everything set up!

The engineers at Pimoroni broke out some handy pins on the back of Inky wHAT, including I2C and SPI, letting you connect additional devices like breakouts and allowing you to show their data right on the display. Refreshing the display takes about 25 seconds. See more!


4119 02
Adafruit CharliePlex LED Matrix Bonnet – 8×16 Yellow LEDs: You won’t be able to look away from the mesmerizing patterns created by this Adafruit CharliePlex LED Matrix Display Bonnet. This 16×8 LED display can be placed atop any Raspberry Pi computer with a 2×20 connector, for a beautiful, bright grid of 128 charlieplexed LEDs. It even comes with a built-in charlieplex driver that is run over I2C.


4121 01 1
Adafruit CharliePlex LED Matrix Bonnet – 8×16 Cool White LEDs :
What is particularly nice about this Wing is the I2C LED driver chip has the ability to PWM each individual LED in a 16×8 grid so you can have beautiful LED lighting effects, without a lot of pin twiddling. Simply tell the chip which LED on the grid you want lit, and what brightness and it’s all taken care of for you. You get 8-bit (256 level) dimming for each individual LED.


4141 02
Pimoroni MINI.MU Glove Kit – without micro:bit: The MINI.MU is MI.MU’s make-it-yourself musical glove for young engineers. It’s a collaboration between Grammy Award-winning musician-goddess Imogen Heap, creative technologist and children’s author Helen Leigh, Pimoroni, and the MI.MU glove team. This kit uses the micro:bit to create a friendly, simple and fun crafty code experience.

These gloves are a simplified, kid-friendly version of Imogen’s more advanced MiMu gloves, used in her performances


4146 03

Adafruit PyPortal Desktop Stand Enclosure Kit: PyPortal is our easy-to-use IoT device that allows you to create all the things for the “Internet of Things” in minutes. Create little pocket universes of joy that connect to something good.

And now that you’ve made a cool internet-connected project with the Adafruit PyPortal, you will want to show it off. Instead of having it lie on a table or taped to a box, try this gracious and elegant enclosure.


4172 00

Adafruit HUZZAH32 – ESP32 Breakout Board: Squeeeeze down your next ESP32 project to its bare-bones essential with the Adafruit HUZZAH32 Breakout. This breakout is basically the ‘big sister’ of our HUZZAH 8266, but instead of an ESP8266 it has the ’32! We’ve pared down our popular Feather ESP32, removing the battery charger and USB-serial converter. You just get a regulator, some protection diodes, two buttons and an LED. For some projects, where price and size are at a premium, you can program this board over the ‘FTDI cable’ breakout when needed, and leave it alone otherwise.



New Products 3/13/19 Featuring #Adafruit #HUZZAH32 – #ESP32 Breakout Board!
Stay in the loop at Adafruit.com/New!


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New nEw NEWs From Adafruit is an email newsletter sent once a week to subscribers only.

It features new products, special offers, exciting original content, and more.

Sign-up for the Adafruit weekly Newsletter here: https://www.adafruit.com/newsletter


CircuitPython 4.0.0 Beta 5 released! @adafruit @circuitpython

Permalink - Posted on 2019-03-17 14:53

We are nearing the end of the betas of 4.0.0, and hope to be issuing a release candidate soon. There are still issues to fix before stable and the new APIs may evolve a bit more. Please use the latest 3.x stable release (available from the new website!) when first starting with CircuitPython. It is stable.

When you find a bug please check the current known issues and file an issue if something isn’t already known.

circuitpython.org

Downloads are now available from circuitpython.org! This site makes it much easier to select the correct file and language for your board. The downloads page is here.

4.0.0

4.0.0 is the latest major revision of CircuitPython. It features:

  • a port to the Nordic nRF52840 microcontroller, including support as a BLE beacon or peripheral (bleio)
  • extensive new support for pixel-based displays (displayio)
  • USB MIDI support
  • messages translated into multiple languages

Installation

To install follow the instructions in our new Welcome to CircuitPython! guide. To install the latest libraries, see this page in that guide.

Try the latest version of the Mu editor for creating and editing your CircuitPython programs and for easy access to the CircuitPython serial connection (the REPL).

New Features, Updates, and Fixes since Beta 4

  • Fix filesystem problem which caused soft reboots to corrupt the filesystem. Thanks to @dhalbert for the fix and @jerryneedell and @makermelissa for testing.

Known Issues

  • There is filesystem corruption on the PCA10059 when BLE is used, perhaps due to its use of an internal flash filesystem, and interactions with the SoftDevice. Thanks to @uhreber for testing.

Breaking Changes from 3.x!

  • ure, ujson, and uerrno renamed to re, json, and errno to reflect that they are subsets of the CPython library modules. Thanks to @dhalbert.
  • busio.UART breaking changes to match PySerial. Thanks to @dhalbert.
    • busio.UART constructor timeout parameter is now in seconds instead of milliseconds.
    • UART.readinto(buf) now does not allow an optional length parameter UART.readinto(buf, len).
    • UART.write(…) no longer allows strings to be written. The bytes written must be bytes or bytearray or an array.array.
  • framebuf has been removed. displayio is its replacement, and will be enhanced after 4.0 to include framebuf‘s functionality. Thanks to @tannewt.
  • Improve struct compatibility with CPython by enforcing stricter types. This may break your code! Thanks to @dhalbert.

Thanks

Thank you to all who used, tested, contributed, helped out, and participated on GitHub and/or Discord:
@adafruit, @anecdata, @arofarn, @arturo182, @ATMakersBill, @brennen, @brentru, @bwshockley, @C47D, @CarlFK, @carlosperate, @caternuson, @CedarGroveStudios, @chalei, @charlesbunaford, @cpforbes, @dastels, @deshipu, @dhalbert, @dsiee, @edspark, @eighthree, @furlaneto, @gcvasconcelos, @glennrub, @gpshead, @hathach, @iraytrace, @Jahor, @jasonp, @jepler, @Jay Doscher, @jerryneedell, @jimblom, @JohnPark, @JoshuaLowe1002, @uanita, @kattni, @kevinjwalters, @klardotsh, @Klowner, @ladyada, @larsks, @madbodger, @maholli, @Makdaam, @MakerMelissa, @MattyT, @mchobby, @microbuilder, @MikeBarela, @Mr. Certainly, @mrmcwethy, @nickzoic, @notro, @oldcrow, @penguindustin, @PhredFL, @platipo, @Retoc, @rhooper, @sabas1080, @sajattack, @sajattack, @saspa, @schmarty, @Senuros, @ShawnHymel, @siddacious, @sommersoft, @SouthernDragon, @TangoJuliett, @tannewt, @Tasm-Devil, @TG-Techie, @uhrheber, @urish, @vgoodwinv, @xpecex, @yeyeto2788, @jreese and surely more we have missed. Join us on the Discord chat to collaborate.

Documentation

Documentation is available in readthedocs.io.

Here are all the changes since 4.0.0-beta.4.
Here are all the changes since 3.1.2.

This release is based on MicroPython 1.9.4 @25ae98f. Support upstream MicroPython by purchasing a PyBoard (from Adafruit here).

Troubleshooting

Check out this guide for info on common problems with CircuitPython. If you are still having, then post to the Adafruit Support Forums and join Discord.


30,000 Players On The Same Game Server #Gaming

Permalink - Posted on 2019-03-17 10:00, modified on 2019-03-15 18:51

Dual Universe has managed to simulate 30,000 players on a single server. Sure the textures are lacking and they players are bots but its still a truly massive number for one server!

Shared by Dual Universe on YouTube:

A Continuous Single-Shard is a server technology that offers an unbounded, no-loading screen universe for millions of players to share together at the same time. It differs from a “single-shard” by the fact that there is no predetermined segmentation of space into fixed zone (like planetary system), but rather offers a fluid experience where, for example, hundreds of thousands of players could gather inside the same city or the same planet.

Learn more from Kataku:

One of the goals of Dual Universe, an upcoming massively multiplayer science fiction sandbox game, is to have every one of its players, potentially millions, playing on the same game server together. Earlier this month developer Novaquark ran a large-scale experiment, simulating 30,000 concurrent players wandering the same in-game planet. It’s a sight to see.

Getting everybody playing in the same place is an issue every massively multiplayer game faces. Techniques like multiple servers and instanced game zones ensure that there are never too many players in the same place at the same time. Dual Universe’s developers want everybody in the same universe.

Read more!


China’s Simulated Mars Open to Tourists and Researchers

Permalink - Posted on 2019-03-17 07:00, modified on 2019-03-15 17:26

via SlashGear

China’s plans for space exploration appear to be grand with it having unveiled a new simulated Mars camp in the remote and arid desert outside the Qinghai province. The camp is open to tourists, researchers, and the media. It’s not billed as a government training facility….

The camp area can accommodate up to 160 people to give them a fully immersive experience of life on Mars. The camp was built to mimic the style of camps that might be placed on Mars in the future. Camp construction began last June, and cost 150 million yuan, or about $22.36 million. China has been clear that this is a tourist.

See more!


Sarah T. Stewart’s New Theory about Where the Moon Comes From

Permalink - Posted on 2019-03-17 06:00, modified on 2019-03-18 14:56

Absolutely fascinating TED talk by Sarah T. Stewart:

The Earth and Moon are like identical twins, made up of the exact same materials — which is really strange, since no other celestial bodies we know of share this kind of chemical relationship. What’s responsible for this special connection?

Read and see more


An “Alternative” Captain Marvel Soundtrack | #SciFiSunday

Permalink - Posted on 2019-03-17 05:00, modified on 2019-03-13 15:16

Head on over to Tor.com to see what the Captain Marvel soundtrack should have been, courtesy of the ever awesome Leah Schnelbach.

Now let me make this absolutely clear: I HEART CAPTAIN MARVEL. I love Carol Danvers the person and I love Captain Marvel the movie but I was a little let down by the soundtrack, because all that ’90s music isn’t there for Carol, it’s there for us, the women and women-adjacent people watching the film. The kids can get a nice hit of retro nostalgia from it (my colleague Molly Templeton has called it “this generation’s Stand by Me soundtrack”) while the adults in the audience can use the music almost as a metatext, commenting on the action and providing emotional cues that we’ll understand, even if the eleven-year-olds in the audience do not. But given that, I think some of the choices were a little too on-the-nose, a little too pop-radio-hit… basically, they weren’t alternative enough.

So I’ve assembled my own. Like a spoilery superteam of songs that will avenge me after I’ve died from mediocre radio hits.

The Captain Marvel soundtrack as it stands is a stellar example of highlighting different female voices. Nearly all of the songs are by women, from a diverse range of genres and styles. Often, when a male voice does show up, it means that something nefarious is afoot. (Or it’s Michael Stipe.) There are a few moments when the songs are a little anachronistic (Hole’s “Celebrity Skin,” for instance, although that one plays over the end credits and as such could be unstuck in time). But again, most of the songs are there for the audience, not for Carol. So I’ve tied to provide a soundtrack that’s a bit weirder and more personal, while also adding some songs that will actually mean something to our Captain.

Read more.


Blinka in space – CircuitPython satellites @maholli404 @zacinaction @adafruit @circuitpython #KickSat

Permalink - Posted on 2019-03-17 04:35, modified at 04:26

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Board

Blinka In Space

Here are 50+ micro satellites loaded with CircuitPython for a hackathon! Imagine all the cool SCIENCE students can conduct in orbit if the software barrier is lowered by using python - Twitter. KickSat Sprite, 2019, running Circuitpython - GitHub.


Alita: Battle Angel sets are a “respite” from dark sci-fi dystopia #SciFiSunday

Permalink - Posted on 2019-03-17 04:00, modified on 2019-03-13 15:02

Who says dystopias have to be dark and gloomy?

Fun read from dezeen.

The post-apocalyptic architecture in sci-fi blockbuster Alita: Battle Angel is a diverse fusion of Panama’s vibrant ruins and Hong Kong’s Kowloon Walled City, say its creators.

Production designers Caylah Eddleblute and Steve Joyner told Dezeen that they looked to the “welcoming” nature of colourful Cuban and Latin American colonial architecture when creating the film set.

“We wanted to do something that was completely different and never seen before, so we looked to environments that were not typically used in these types of films,” said Joyner.

Read more.


Adafruit Weekly Editorial Round-Up: March 10th – March 16th

Permalink - Posted on 2019-03-17 00:00, modified at 19:23

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ADAFRUIT WEEKLY EDITORIAL ROUND-UP


We’ve got so much happening here at Adafruit that it’s not always easy to keep up! Don’t fret, we’ve got you covered. Each week we’ll be posting a handy round-up of what we’ve been up to, ranging from learn guides to blog articles, videos, and more.


BLOG

Adafruit 2million thanks blog

2,000,000 THANKS! Celebrating 2m orders @adafruit – thank you! #makerbusiness #InternationWomensDay
On March 8, 2019 @ 7:55 pm ET the 2,000,000 order was placed for an Adafruit FONA 808 – Mini Cellular GSM + GPS Breakout, Adafruit Ultimate GPS FeatherWing, Mini GSM/Cellular Quad-Band Antenna – 2dBi SMA Plug, Adafruit Feather M0 with RFM95 LoRa Radio – 900MHz – RadioFruit, Adalogger FeatherWing – RTC + SD Add-on For All Feather Boards, and included the free items: Adafruit Perma-Proto Half-sized Breadboard PCB, Boomy the BoomBox – Limited Edition Enamel Pin. We’re reaching out to the customer and will be saying thanks … 2 million times 🙂

More BLOG:


LEARN

Makecode IMG 2513 2019 03 08 18 32 47
NEW GUIDE: Milk Carton Boat with CPX and MakeCode #CircuitPlaygroundExpress #MakeCode @adafruit

This NEW GUIDE takes you through the process of building an ultra-low cost DIY boat, and demonstrates how to use MakeCode to control the boat in a variety of ways. This DIY boat project is a great way to dip one’s toes into coding.
A one-quart milk carton is the perfect size for a boat that will easily contain all the electronics you want to add while still a convenient size for playing in a bathtub.
This project will take you through the build process and demonstrate how to use MakeCode to control the boat in a variety of ways. Learn more!

More LEARN

Browse all that’s new in the Adafruit Learning System here!


Arduino Day 2019 #ArduinoD19 @arduino Sat. March 16th 8pm ET live @adafruit

Permalink - Posted on 2019-03-17 00:00, modified on 2019-03-16 18:45

Arduino Day 2019 #ArduinoD19 Sat. March 16th 8pm ET live (video).


Simon! Circuit Playground Express at the STEM Fare / Fair with MakeCode @adafruit @msmakecode

Permalink - Posted on 2019-03-16 22:41, modified at 22:31

Img 0044-1

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Excellent Simon! display and project using Circuit Playground Express at the STEM Fare / Fair with MakeCode. Go work X!


Top 10 Arduino library downloads @arduino @arduinolibs #arduino #arduinod19

Permalink - Posted on 2019-03-16 17:12, modified at 16:58

2019 Ytd Downloads

Mostdownloaded

Today during the Arduino Day live stream Arduino had a slide with the top library downloads (we had asked about this for the AMA). Here are the top 10, and a screenshot from the live video. Arduino said they would publish these shortly.

Most popular libraries (over 2,150 in IDE, over 7000 in the wild)
2019 – YtD Downloads

  1. 238,344 Adafruit_Circuit_Playground
  2. 161,727 DHT_sensor_llbrary (Adafruit)
  3. 99,450 ArduinoJson
  4. 84,872 Servo
  5. 82,894 SD
  6. 79,774 Adafruit_GFX_Library
  7. 59,342 Adafuit_NeoPixel
  8. 57,582 LiquidCrysta1_12C
  9. 55,322 MFRC522
  10. 48,414 Blynk

For Adafruit, having the top spot and 4 total in the top 10 let us know the open-source code we release and maintain is being used, thank you community and to our team for your contributions and support. Also in the listings from Adafruit…

Adafruit_SSD1306
Adafruit_Unified_Sensor
Adafruit_ESP8266
Adafruit_MQTT
Adafruit_IO_Arduino
Adafruit_BME280_Library

This is helpful and useful information for developers and the industry to see what folks are using, this only less than 3 months of data for 2019, however – there are a lot of good insights. Having this available as JSON or on a site would help out long-term as well for being able to monitor the downloads.


REMINDER: Arduino Day 2019 #ArduinoD19 @arduino Sat. March 16th 8pm ET live video @adafruit

Permalink - Posted on 2019-03-16 16:51, modified at 16:42

Arduinoday19
REMINDER: The 6th Arduino Day 2019 is March 16th, this Saturday. There are events around the world and Adafruit is going to do a live stream at 8pm ET on Sat. night March 16th on youtube.com/adafruit/live

Arduino Day is a worldwide birthday celebration of Arduino. It’s a 24-hour-long event organized by the Community and Arduino’s founders, where people interested in Arduino come together, share their projects and experiences, as well as learn more about the open-source platform.

https://day.arduino.cc/


Arduino will be streaming on their social channels (YouTube) throughout the day as well.

OFFICIAL ARDUINO DAY SCHEDULE, ALL TIMES ARE CET
11.00 AM = Open Day and Exhibition of Arduino Project, in collaboration with WeMake
2.30 – 5.30 PM = Arduino edu-activities for kids. These will be free of charge and dedicated for children ages 5 to 15. No reservation required.
3.30 – 5.30 PM = Arduino keynotes by Massimo Banzi and the Arduino team. These talks will be streamed on the Arduino social channels.
3.30 – 3.35 = Welcome by Massimo Banzi and Fabio Violante
3.35 – 3.50 = The State of Arduino with Massimo Banzi and Fabio Violante
3.50 – 4.15 = Arduino Day Community Challenge: the winners
4.15 – 4.30 = Arduino and the open-source community
4.30 – 5.00 = Arduino for IoT with Luca Cipriani and Gianluca Varisco
5.00 – 5.15 = Arduino Education with Nerea de la Riva Iriepa
5.15 – 5.30 = wrap up
6.00 – 7.00 PM = Ask Me Anything with Massimo Banzi! The AMA will be streamed on the Arduino social channels. Want to submit your question? Please register on the Arduino Forum and submit your question here.


12 Science Fiction and Fantasy Books to Read this Spring

Permalink - Posted on 2019-03-16 10:00, modified on 2019-03-06 19:15

A really neat list you should check out from SyFy.

March is here, and that means spring! Or at least, thoughts of and longing for spring as many of us are still ensconced in winter’s bitter chill. There’s hope on the horizon, though, both with the weather and with these awesome sci-fi and fantasy books that are coming out this month.

You may notice a slight change with this round-up: There aren’t any YA (young adult) books on it. That doesn’t mean we don’t love YA; it’s just that there is so much great SFF coming out these days that YA will get its own list starting in March. That’s right, there will be even more books for you to choose from each and every month. I can’t even apologize for what it will do to your to-be-read lists.

Read more!


An Origami Robot Gripper #Robotics #3DPrinting

Permalink - Posted on 2019-03-16 09:00, modified on 2019-03-14 13:29

Origami robot gripper mit csail designboom 1800

Robotics often focus on anthropomorphic concepts, grippers should look like fingers and grabbers should look like hands. This robot gripping system goes a different direction using 3D-printed-origami and suction. Via DesignBoom:

A team of technologists at MIT have developed a robot gripper that uses a 3D-printed origami structure to lift up to 100 times its own weight. the cone-shaped gripper comprises three parts — a 3D-printed, 16-piece silicone rubber skeleton with a gripper-to-mount connector encased by an airtight skin.

a vacuum collapses the origami-inspired gripper which then closes around the object functioning like a stronghold grasp. the soft robot gripper can adapt to the shape of whatever it’s grabbing without compromising its strength. this allows it to pick up delicate objects without harming them, while still maintaining a strong enough grip to lift 100 times its own weight.

Origami robot gripper mit csail designboom 1

Learn more!


The Comedy Wildlife Photography Awards Accepting 2019 Submissions #celebratephotography

Permalink - Posted on 2019-03-16 08:00, modified on 2019-03-14 12:33


NewImage

From The Comedy Wildlife Photography Awards:

To enter the competition, please enter your details below to register, really quick and easy. We’ll send you an email with your own personal link to manage your entry, yup, we are that nice! Keep it safe as you’ll need it again, really we mean that.

Enter here, read more here and see the 2018 winners here!


Photofooter

We #celebratephotography here at Adafruit every Saturday. From photographers of all levels to projects you have made or those that inspire you to make, we’re on it! Got a tip? Well, send it in!

If you’re interested in making your own project and need some gear, we’ve got you covered. Be sure to check out our Raspberry Pi accessories and our DIY cameras.


Photogrammetry Basics #celebratephotography

Permalink - Posted on 2019-03-16 07:00, modified on 2019-03-06 14:37

Thanks to Eric for sending us this tip! Eric writes:

The power of Photogrammetry is quite amazing. The ability to accurately create an object from a series of photos never fails to amaze me. I take you on a basic journey into the dark art of scanning an object to create some solid 3D data that you can then use your favorite CAD application.

I cover how to prep the object you want to scan, mount it properly, set up you basic lighting, and the basic concept of your camera set up. Following some simple steps should yield decent, usable results.

See more on YouTube


Photofooter

We #celebratephotography here at Adafruit every Saturday. From photographers of all levels to projects you have made or those that inspire you to make, we’re on it! Got a tip? Well, send it in!

If you’re interested in making your own project and need some gear, we’ve got you covered. Be sure to check out our Raspberry Pi accessories and our DIY cameras.


Music is shown to affect mental state of the brain

Permalink - Posted on 2019-03-16 06:00, modified on 2019-03-06 19:07

via Johns Hopkins News-Letter

Psychological studies show that music has an effect on the way people feel, think and behave. Music is beneficial, especially to those with anxiety and depression, but evidence has also shown that some music is linked with violent behavior.

There is proof that listening to music may affect your long-term health; other studies have shown that listening to music is correlated with an increase in the production of certain antibodies. Antibodies are proteins in the blood that can combat foreign substances and help prevent disease.

Read More.


Great Series on the Elements from Periodic Videos #SaturdayMorningCartoons

Permalink - Posted on 2019-03-16 04:30, modified on 2019-03-15 16:54

Periodic Videos posts wonderfully entertaining and informative videos on the elements. They blow up hydrogen bubbles and make dubstep tracks out of all the sounds that can be made with the tools and elements in their lab. And their host has the best hair on YouTube. Period.

Periodic Videos


25 million + Raspberry Pi computers sold @Raspberry_Pi #raspberrypi

Permalink - Posted on 2019-03-16 00:49, modified at 00:39

Pi-1-1

A lot happened in 2019 already! The Raspberry Pi folks have some interesting stats, marketshare / units and more! Congrats!

Through their clubs and competitions, they are engaging 250,000 young people every week in learning how to create with digital technologies. AND sold the 25 millionth Raspberry Pi at the end of February 2019 and opened a store!

We checked with Philip Colligan, Chief Executive, Raspberry Pi Foundation to make sure this was OK to post 🙂


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MakeCode Minute: Facial Animation @adafruit @johnedgarpark #adafruit @MSMakeCode

Permalink - Posted on 2019-03-15 23:45

In this week’s in MakeCode Minute: Facial Animation. How to easily add facial animation to your character sprites! Make your own games, and design your own characters!
Play in the browser, on a Raspberry Pi, or on an M4-based microcontroller and TFT screen!

To learn more about MakeCode, check out this guide.


Adafruit IO-Powered PowerPoint Slide Controller @adafruitio @office @dotnet #MQTT

Permalink - Posted on 2019-03-15 22:23


James Bulpin “was looking for a really simple solution to bounce messages via the cloud without all the complexity of a full IoT hub solution” and discovered Adafruit IO. He quickly built a mobile powerpoint slide controller. If you’re not counting his phone’s web browser displaying an Adafruit IO dashboard, it uses no extra electronics. Instead, he’s running a .NET MQTT client on the same computer to send events to Microsoft Powerpoint.

To send data to his computer, he built a drag-and-drop dashboard on Adafruit IO to interact with MQTT feeds.

The .Net code for this project is published publicly on GitHub.

Read more…


NEW GUIDE: PyPortal YouTube Views and Subscribers Display @adafruit @johnedgarpark #adafruit #youtube

Permalink - Posted on 2019-03-15 21:59

NEW GUIDE alert! The PyPortal YouTube Views and Subscribers Display

It’s not all about the stats, right? Well, in YouTube land, maybe it is sometimes! If you’re a little bit obsessed with tracking your stats, read on!

This PyPortal YouTube Views and Subscribers Display runs on CircuitPython and uses the Google APIs to grab JSON data and display your view count and subscriber count. And it does so through the thin air with its on-board WiFi ESP32 co-processor.

The text is displayed on top of a custom background graphic and mounted to a 3D printed stand with a matching retro-style red bezel!

Plus, you’ll hear a satisfying “ba-ding!” each time you gain a new subscriber.


CircuitPython 4.0.0 Beta 4 released!

Permalink - Posted on 2019-03-15 21:48

From the GitHub release page (download from here):

This is hopefully the last beta build of 4.0.0 before release candidate. There are still issues to fix before stable and the new APIs may evolve a bit more. Please use the latest 3.x stable release (available from the new website!) when first starting with CircuitPython. It is stable.

When you find a bug please check the current known issues and file an issue if something isn’t already known.

circuitpython.org

Downloads are now available from circuitpython.org! This site makes it much easier to select the correct file and language for your board. The downloads page is here.

4.0.0

4.0.0 is the latest major revision of CircuitPython. It features:

  • a port to the Nordic nRF52840 microcontroller, including support as a BLE beacon or peripheral (bleio)
  • extensive new support for pixel-based displays (displayio)
  • USB MIDI support
  • messages translated into multiple languages

Installation

To install follow the instructions in our new Welcome to CircuitPython! guide. To install the latest libraries, see this page in that guide.

Try the latest version of the Mu editor for creating and editing your CircuitPython programs and for easy access to the CircuitPython serial connection (the REPL).

New Features, Updates, and Fixes since Beta 3

  • Replace position in TileGrid with separate x and y to make it consistent with Group. This will require code and library updates. Thanks to @tannewt
  • Remove networking support from Feather M0 Express and Metro M0 Express. Thanks to @tannewt
  • Add Pirate language support. Thanks to @sommersoft
  • Updates to pewpew10 and ugame10. Thanks to @deshipu
  • Group now takes x and y keyword args for initial position. Thanks to @tannewt
  • Add support for changing tile indices in TileGrid using []. Thanks to @tannewt
  • atmel-samd: PWM fix allowing for more outputs to work. Thanks to @dhalbert
  • Add checks to prevent modifying the filesystem when read-only such as moving a file. Thanks to @tannewt

New Boards

Breaking Changes from 3.x!

  • ure, ujson, and uerrno renamed to re, json, and errno to reflect that they are subsets of the CPython library modules. Thanks to @dhalbert.
  • busio.UART breaking changes to match PySerial. Thanks to @dhalbert
    • busio.UART constructor timeout parameter is now in seconds instead of milliseconds.
    • UART.readinto(buf) now does not allow an optional length parameter UART.readinto(buf, len).
    • UART.write(…) no longer allows strings to be written. The bytes written must be bytes or bytearray or an array.array.
  • framebuf has been removed. displayio is its replacement, and will be enhanced after 4.0 to include framebuf‘s functionality. Thanks to @tannewt.
  • Improve struct compatibility with CPython by enforcing stricter types. This may break your code! Thanks to @dhalbert.

Thanks

Thank you to all who used, tested, contributed, helped out, and participated on GitHub and/or Discord:
@adafruit, @anecdata, @arofarn, @arturo182, @ATMakersBill, @brennen, @brentru, @bwshockley, @C47D, @CarlFK, @carlosperate, @caternuson, @CedarGroveStudios, @chalei, @charlesbunaford, @cpforbes, @dastels, @deshipu, @dhalbert, @dsiee, @edspark, @eighthree, @furlaneto, @gcvasconcelos, @glennrub, @gpshead, @hathach, @iraytrace, @Jahor, @jasonp, @jepler, @jay Doscher, @jerryneedell, @jimblom, @johnpark, @JoshuaLowe1002, @uanita, @kattni, @kevinjwalters, @klardotsh, @Klowner, @ladyada, @larsks, @madbodger, @maholli, @Makdaam, @makermelissa, @MattyT, @mchobby, @microbuilder, @MikeBarela, @Mr. Certainly, @mrmcwethy, @nickzoic, @notro, @oldcrow, @penguindustin, @PhredFL, @platipo, @Retoc, @rhooper, @sabas1080, @sajattack, @sajattack, @saspa, @schmarty, @Senuros, @ShawnHymel, @siddacious, @sommersoft, @SouthernDragon, @TangoJuliett, @tannewt, @Tasm-Devil, @TG-Techie, @uhrheber, @urish, @vgoodwinv, @xpecex, @yeyeto2788, @jreese and surely more we have missed. Join us on the Discord chat to collaborate.

Documentation

Documentation is available in readthedocs.io.

Here are all the changes since 4.0.0-beta.3.
Here are all the changes since 3.1.2.

This release is based on MicroPython 1.9.4 @25ae98f. Support upstream MicroPython by purchasing a PyBoard (from Adafruit here).

Troubleshooting

Check out this guide for info on common problems with CircuitPython. If you are still having, then post to the Adafruit Support Forums and join Discord.